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Understanding Socio-Economic Disadvantage and its Impact on Student Learning, Perseverance in School, and School Success P...
Poverty in Quebec and Canada <ul><li>Since the beginning of the 90’s, poverty has been rising in Quebec </li></ul><ul><ul>...
Why is it so important to  address equity issues?  <ul><li>If we don’t grasp the complexity of the problem, the risk incre...
Effects of poverty in school <ul><li>Success, orientation and length of schooling are related to socio-economic background...
<ul><li>For a long time, we held children and their parents responsible for academic failure: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We tho...
Differences that explain the failure are  Social and Cultural Differences <ul><li>Differences do exist: disadvantaged chil...
Day to day life . . .  <ul><li>Some families are in precarious situations. leading them to develop distinct survival skill...
Lifestyle impact on  learning and perception <ul><li>Different culture (culture is a set of acquired knowledge in one or m...
 
Equity in education <ul><li>A principle that guides policy and practice holding high expectations and providing appropriat...
Culture is complex… <ul><li>Nationality   Religion </li></ul><ul><li>Race  Ethnicity   Family </li></ul><ul><li>  Gender  ...
Diversity & Cultural Competence <ul><li>Valuing Diversity is a necessary step along the continuum of cultural competency a...
Factors relating to  Low Socio-economic status <ul><li>Low level of scholarity makes it difficult for parents to  follow -...
In such a context…. <ul><li>It is important that solutions are not only adapted to the realities of these families but als...
Programs targeting  Socio-Economic Disadvantage <ul><li>New Approaches, New Solutions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Originally tar...
NANS schools <ul><li>Schools with an IMSE ranking of 8, 9 et 10 </li></ul><ul><li>Factors that determine disadvantage:  </...
NANS strategy <ul><li>Identify the strengths (protective factors) </li></ul><ul><li>Identify the weaknesses (risk factors)...
NANS strategy… <ul><li>Make sure to identify the conditions for achievement </li></ul><ul><li>Professional development act...
Supporting Montreal Schools Measures <ul><li>Measure 1: Adapted actions that promote learning and success for all. </li></...
The role of the school in disadvantaged areas <ul><li>The school has a role to play in helping students from disadvantaged...
The role of the school in promoting perseverance <ul><li>Support the motivation and perseverance of students  </li></ul><u...
Home-School Partnerships <ul><li>There is a positive and convincing relationship between family involvement and benefits f...
Impact of Home-School Partnerships <ul><li>When parents and school staff work together to support learning, students: </li...
Family involvement… <ul><li>… is a protective factor. The more families can support their children’s progress, the better ...
Best practices to get families and schools closer together <ul><li>Find ways to reach those parents  that are usually more...
Difficult dialogues are a  crucial part of the process <ul><li>Conversations about race, disproportionality, and equity ar...
Disproportionality in  Special Education <ul><li>In addition to the problems the students experience in their personal liv...
Differentiated intervention that is considered to foster learning and motivation <ul><li>Pedagogical approaches that promo...
Promising approaches at the classroom level <ul><li>Classroom management that fosters learning and motivation as well as t...
Promoting instructional equity <ul><li>Acknowledge students’ differences as well as their commonalities </li></ul><ul><li>...
Promoting personal equity <ul><li>Engage in reflective practice </li></ul><ul><li>Explore personal and family histories </...
Promising approaches at the  school level <ul><li>Professional development activities for school administrators </li></ul>...
Promising approaches at the  school level <ul><li>Flexibility and diversification in the organization of services  to meet...
Support for at-risk students - Learning <ul><li>Adapted support and organization for all students (especially those achiev...
Support for at-risk students - Behaviour <ul><li>Prevention, development of social skills </li></ul><ul><li>Differentiated...
<ul><li>Both the situations experienced in disadvantaged areas and their solutions are complex </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Activ...
Questions?
For more information <ul><li>The official MELS site for NANS </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.mels.gouv.qc.ca/Agirautrement/in...
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Understanding Socio-Economic Disadvantage and its impact on student learning, perseverance in school, and school success

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Talking about a socio-economic disadvantage, equity, cultural competency, and programs that serve students in disadvantaged areas. Some tips and ideas for how to work with students effectively, and ways to adapt your practice.

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Understanding Socio-Economic Disadvantage and its impact on student learning, perseverance in school, and school success

  1. 1. Understanding Socio-Economic Disadvantage and its Impact on Student Learning, Perseverance in School, and School Success Presented by Patricia Peter and Holly Hampson, Agents de d éveloppement en milieu défavorisé
  2. 2. Poverty in Quebec and Canada <ul><li>Since the beginning of the 90’s, poverty has been rising in Quebec </li></ul><ul><ul><li>More than one out of three live under the poverty line; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>one third of families are single-parent families (31,7%); </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>85,2% of them are single mothers </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Why is it so important to address equity issues? <ul><li>If we don’t grasp the complexity of the problem, the risk increases that: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>empathy and effort will be limited </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>each student will not be treated with dignity and respect </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>interventions will “miss the mark” and fail to be effective </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Effects of poverty in school <ul><li>Success, orientation and length of schooling are related to socio-economic background </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The more the student population is disadvantaged, the more likely the school career will be shorter and more problematic, right from the start </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Disadvantaged children are more likely to quit, to perform poorly and are less likely to continue on to post-secondary studies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Disadvantaged children have less power in school and have more difficulty fulfilling their needs, despite being the students who have the greatest need for educational resources </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>For a long time, we held children and their parents responsible for academic failure: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We thought they came with all sorts of deficits in all aspects of development (language, affective, cognitive) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Research has not proved any evidence of deficits </li></ul><ul><li>Many studies show that disadvantaged children have the same learning abilities as other children </li></ul>How do we explain academic failure in disadvantaged neighborhoods?
  6. 6. Differences that explain the failure are Social and Cultural Differences <ul><li>Differences do exist: disadvantaged children are different but not deficient </li></ul><ul><li>These differences are essentially social and cultural (Drolet, 1993) </li></ul><ul><li>The required knowledge and experiences for success in school are consistent with the middle class values. </li></ul><ul><li>Not everyone shares these values, and they may need to be discussed explicitly </li></ul>
  7. 7. Day to day life . . . <ul><li>Some families are in precarious situations. leading them to develop distinct survival skills: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>They learn to live day-by-day. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They may be overwhelmed by their everyday life; they can’t delay gratification, that is, they can not refuse pleasure when it is offered. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They have a practical approach to things. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Ownership is being somebody” (material culture) </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Lifestyle impact on learning and perception <ul><li>Different culture (culture is a set of acquired knowledge in one or many areas) </li></ul><ul><li>Oral culture </li></ul><ul><li>Culture of action </li></ul><ul><li>Culture of the present </li></ul>
  9. 10. Equity in education <ul><li>A principle that guides policy and practice holding high expectations and providing appropriate resources so that all students can achieve at a rigorous standard. </li></ul>
  10. 11. Culture is complex… <ul><li>Nationality Religion </li></ul><ul><li>Race Ethnicity Family </li></ul><ul><li> Gender Sexual Orientation </li></ul><ul><li>Socio-Economic Class Geography </li></ul><ul><li>Ability Education </li></ul><ul><li>Profession </li></ul>
  11. 12. Diversity & Cultural Competence <ul><li>Valuing Diversity is a necessary step along the continuum of cultural competency and culturally responsive pedagogy, but it is not enough. </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural Competence requires knowledge, skills and experience and the ability to transform these into practice which results in improved services and outcomes. </li></ul>
  12. 13. Factors relating to Low Socio-economic status <ul><li>Low level of scholarity makes it difficult for parents to follow -up on school work </li></ul><ul><li>Many parents have to deal with an accumulation of problems linked to poverty </li></ul><ul><li>Realities vary greatly from one environment to another </li></ul>
  13. 14. In such a context…. <ul><li>It is important that solutions are not only adapted to the realities of these families but also aimed at promoting the parental role. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Welfare poor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Generational(2 generations) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Situational(lack of resources due to a particular event, job loss, illness, addiction, disaster) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Working poor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>2 jobs to be financially independant </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Minimum wage, supporting 2 kids </li></ul></ul></ul>
  14. 15. Programs targeting Socio-Economic Disadvantage <ul><li>New Approaches, New Solutions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Originally targeting secondary schools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Expanded in 2007 to target elementary and secondary </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Supporting Montreal Schools Program </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Targeting elementary schools on the island of Montreal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Forerunner of NANS </li></ul></ul>
  15. 16. NANS schools <ul><li>Schools with an IMSE ranking of 8, 9 et 10 </li></ul><ul><li>Factors that determine disadvantage: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mother’s level of education (2/3) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parent’s employment status in the census year (1/3) </li></ul></ul>
  16. 17. NANS strategy <ul><li>Identify the strengths (protective factors) </li></ul><ul><li>Identify the weaknesses (risk factors) </li></ul><ul><li>Conduct an analysis of the situation </li></ul><ul><li>Establish priorities and set objectives based on the analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Take into account promising practices </li></ul><ul><li>Make decisions that are best adapted to the school’s needs, and the available resources </li></ul>
  17. 18. NANS strategy… <ul><li>Make sure to identify the conditions for achievement </li></ul><ul><li>Professional development activities for all staff are crtical </li></ul>
  18. 19. Supporting Montreal Schools Measures <ul><li>Measure 1: Adapted actions that promote learning and success for all. </li></ul><ul><li>Development of reading competency. </li></ul><ul><li>The guidance- oriented approach. </li></ul><ul><li>Professional development of school administrators and the school team. </li></ul><ul><li>Access to cultural resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperative links with students’ families. </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperative links with community organizations. </li></ul>
  19. 20. The role of the school in disadvantaged areas <ul><li>The school has a role to play in helping students from disadvantaged backgrounds be successful: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Adopt educational practices that are adapted to disadvantaged areas (working on competency, motivation) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ensure that they provide support to students to develop social comptencies (building positive relationships, a sense of belonging) </li></ul></ul>
  20. 21. The role of the school in promoting perseverance <ul><li>Support the motivation and perseverance of students </li></ul><ul><ul><li>developing a positive attitude towards learning, guidance-oriented approaches, strengthening the link between school and future plans </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Support students outside of class time, with the collaboration of family and community </li></ul><ul><ul><li>varied activities that are supervised, developing healthy habits, access to community services </li></ul></ul>
  21. 22. Home-School Partnerships <ul><li>There is a positive and convincing relationship between family involvement and benefits for students, including improved academic achievement. This relationship holds across families of all economic, racial/ethnic, and educational backgrounds and for students at all ages. </li></ul>
  22. 23. Impact of Home-School Partnerships <ul><li>When parents and school staff work together to support learning, students: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Earn higher grades and test scores </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enroll in higher level programs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Adapt well to school and attend regularly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have better social skills and behavior </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Graduate and go on to higher education </li></ul></ul>
  23. 24. Family involvement… <ul><li>… is a protective factor. The more families can support their children’s progress, the better their children do in school and the longer they stay in school. </li></ul>
  24. 25. Best practices to get families and schools closer together <ul><li>Find ways to reach those parents that are usually more difficult to get involved: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Facilitate the parents’ role </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assistance for students and their families during various transition phases </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parents of children with special needs (IEP development) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parents of students going through difficult times </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Working parents that are unreachable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Parents who may be undereducated or have had negative experiences with school </li></ul></ul>
  25. 26. Difficult dialogues are a crucial part of the process <ul><li>Conversations about race, disproportionality, and equity are awkward and often difficult, but necessary. </li></ul><ul><li>Part of the role of the team is to ensure that team meetings are a safe place for having honest and “courageous” conversations, where common understandings can be created. </li></ul>
  26. 27. Disproportionality in Special Education <ul><li>In addition to the problems the students experience in their personal lives away from school, the schools create a whole new set of problems for children they deem different. As schools become more wedded to psychological models, students are recruited into new categories of pathology. Students who do not conform to particular behavioral expectations may be labeled &quot;disabled&quot; in some way, that is, suffering from attention deficit disorder, emotional disability, or cognitive disabilities. Students do in fact confront real mental and emotional problems, but we need to consider the way students' racial, ethnic, cultural, linguistic, and socioeconomic characteristics are deployed to make their assignments to these disability categories more likely. </li></ul><ul><li>Gloria Ladson Billings </li></ul>
  27. 28. Differentiated intervention that is considered to foster learning and motivation <ul><li>Pedagogical approaches that promote the establishment of links, memory and transfer </li></ul><ul><li>Pedagogical approaches that make links to vocational aspirations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use of a guidance-oriented approach </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Adapted intervention focused on the development of competencies </li></ul><ul><li>Development of reading skills </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluation for learning and timely, ongoing feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Enhanced learning situations (experiental learning, hands-on approaches, field trips and real-world experiences) </li></ul>
  28. 29. Promising approaches at the classroom level <ul><li>Classroom management that fosters learning and motivation as well as the development of social skills </li></ul><ul><li>Student-centred classroom organization and monitoring </li></ul><ul><li>Individual work (homework and lessons) that students value </li></ul>
  29. 30. Promoting instructional equity <ul><li>Acknowledge students’ differences as well as their commonalities </li></ul><ul><li>Validate students’ cultural identity in classroom practices and instructional materials </li></ul><ul><li>Educate students about the diversity of the world around them </li></ul><ul><li>Promote equity and mutual respect </li></ul><ul><li>Assess students’ ability and achievement validly </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage students to think critically </li></ul><ul><li>Challenge students to strive for excellence as defined by their potential </li></ul>
  30. 31. Promoting personal equity <ul><li>Engage in reflective practice </li></ul><ul><li>Explore personal and family histories </li></ul><ul><li>Acknowledge membership in different groups </li></ul><ul><li>Learn about the history and experiences of diverse groups </li></ul><ul><li>Visit students’ families and communities </li></ul><ul><li>Visit or read about successful teachers in diverse settings </li></ul><ul><li>Participate in reforming the institution </li></ul>
  31. 32. Promising approaches at the school level <ul><li>Professional development activities for school administrators </li></ul><ul><li>Quality professional development activities for and collaborative work with the teaching, professional and support staff of schools </li></ul>
  32. 33. Promising approaches at the school level <ul><li>Flexibility and diversification in the organization of services to meet the needs of students and school staff </li></ul><ul><li>Improvement of the school’s socio-educational environment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Safe and trusting climate, healthy relationships </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Feeling of belonging </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cultural, sports and community activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Participation of students </li></ul></ul>
  33. 34. Support for at-risk students - Learning <ul><li>Adapted support and organization for all students (especially those achieving below level, unprepared for kindergarten, or experiencing language of instruction difficulties) </li></ul><ul><li>Adapted didactic and pedagogical approaches that are associated with authentic evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>Intervention, support and monitoring models that facilitate social and vocational integration </li></ul><ul><li>Student-centred and rigorous monitoring models and ongoing evaluation of the effectiveness of intervention </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop a system to track individual student progress, particularly at-risk students </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Adapted approaches that facilitate the transition phases </li></ul>
  34. 35. Support for at-risk students - Behaviour <ul><li>Prevention, development of social skills </li></ul><ul><li>Differentiated intervention </li></ul><ul><li>Harmonization of services and coordination of activities in the school, board and community </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration with families </li></ul>
  35. 36. <ul><li>Both the situations experienced in disadvantaged areas and their solutions are complex </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Active participation of several stakeholders </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Resourcefulness, creativity and innovation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Collaboration and coordination of partners </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Differentiated intervention </li></ul></ul>
  36. 37. Questions?
  37. 38. For more information <ul><li>The official MELS site for NANS </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.mels.gouv.qc.ca/Agirautrement/index.htm </li></ul><ul><li>The NANS site on LEARN </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.learnquebec.ca/en/content/mels/success/ </li></ul><ul><li>The NANS wiki </li></ul><ul><li>http://sites.google.com/site/succeedtolearn/ </li></ul><ul><li>Follow us on Twitter! </li></ul><ul><li>http://twitter.com/newapproaches </li></ul><ul><li>Holly Hampson </li></ul><ul><li>(514) 483-7200 x7357 </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Patricia Peter </li></ul><ul><li>(514) 483-7200 x7421 </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul>

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