Group Assignment LA 1
Case Study of :
Oceanic Discoverer
Prepared by:
1) PANDIARAJ A/L RETENAM
2) ABDUL JABBAR KHAN
3) MD....
Contents
1. Ship’s particular
2. What, when and where happen?
3. Location of the watertight door
4. How it happen
5. Why h...
Ship’s particular
Type: Passenger Ship
Length: 63m
Breadth: 13m
GT: 1779
Service Speed: 12 knots
Flag: Australian Register...
What, when and where happen?
• A chief engineer was trapped by a watertight door for more than 8
minutes.
• Happened on 19...
Location of the watertight door
How it happen?
• The ship was conducting the fire and emergency drill. Therefor they
also has to carry out close and test ...
Why he got trapped?
• The watertight doors were normally set in the local-control mode,
which meant that they would not au...
Other reasons for the accident.
• The door had been set to close at twice the allowable closing
speed, which would have li...
Overall view of the watertight
door
Solas requirement Chapter II-1 Regulation
15.7 referred to power-operated sliding
watertight doors
• Provided with control...
Lesson learned
1. Always fully open a watertight door before passing through the doorway
when the door is in the remote-cl...
END OF SLIDE SHOW
THANK YOU
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ship case study

  1. 1. Group Assignment LA 1 Case Study of : Oceanic Discoverer Prepared by: 1) PANDIARAJ A/L RETENAM 2) ABDUL JABBAR KHAN 3) MD.MIZANUR RAHMAN PARVEZ
  2. 2. Contents 1. Ship’s particular 2. What, when and where happen? 3. Location of the watertight door 4. How it happen 5. Why he got trapped 6. Other reasons for the accident 7. Overall view of the watertight door 8. Solas requirement regarding watertight door 9. Lesson learned
  3. 3. Ship’s particular Type: Passenger Ship Length: 63m Breadth: 13m GT: 1779 Service Speed: 12 knots Flag: Australian Registered Classification: ABS
  4. 4. What, when and where happen? • A chief engineer was trapped by a watertight door for more than 8 minutes. • Happened on 19 Feb 2009 • Port of Napier, New Zealand.
  5. 5. Location of the watertight door
  6. 6. How it happen? • The ship was conducting the fire and emergency drill. Therefor they also has to carry out close and test the hydraulically closed watertight doors. • The Master has closed the watertight door by using remote control system/switch from the bridge. • After that the Chief Engineer has open the door and got trapped. • He was trapped at watertight door for more than 8 minutes. • Until the crew found and removed him. • Later he was send to hospital. • Unluckily he died on the way to hospital.
  7. 7. Why he got trapped? • The watertight doors were normally set in the local-control mode, which meant that they would not automatically close after someone had walked through. At the time of the accident the doors were in the remote-close mode, which meant they would automatically close when the user released the opening handle. The crew on board the Oceanic Discoverer routinely passed through the watertight doors without fully opening them when the doors were in the local-control mode, a practice that was probably followed when the doors were in the remote-close mode as well. • The chief engineer could also followed by trying to pass the watertight door before it is fully opened.
  8. 8. Other reasons for the accident. • The door had been set to close at twice the allowable closing speed, which would have likely contributed to the accident. • It is possible that the audible alarm warning that the door was closing, was not working at the time. A failure of the audible alarm may have contributed to the accident.
  9. 9. Overall view of the watertight door
  10. 10. Solas requirement Chapter II-1 Regulation 15.7 referred to power-operated sliding watertight doors • Provided with controls for opening and closing the door by power from both sides of the door and also for closing the door by power from the central operating console on the bridge. • provided with an audible alarm, distinct from any other alarm in the area, which will sound whenever the door is closed remotely by power and which shall sound for at least 5s [seconds] but no more than 10 s before the door begins to move and shall continue sounding until the door is completely closed. In the case of remote hand operation it is sufficient for the audible alarm to sound only when the door is moving. • Additionally, in passenger areas and areas of high ambient noise the Administration may require the audible alarm to be supplemented by an intermittent visual signal at the door. • shall have an approximately uniform rate of closure under power. The closure time, from the time the door begins to move to the time it reaches the completely closed position shall in no case be less than 20s or more than 40s with the ship in an upright position.
  11. 11. Lesson learned 1. Always fully open a watertight door before passing through the doorway when the door is in the remote-close mode. 2. The faster the door closes, the greater the risk. Under no circumstances should watertight doors be set to close faster than the maximum allowable speed. 3. Ship operators should adopt specific procedures for operating watertight doors in both the local-control and remote-close modes. The procedures should be compatible with the doors’ purpose and design, and the frequency with which they are used. 4. Legislation governing the design and use of watertight doors should be flexible enough to achieve appropriate procedures for the use of any watertight door in any mode. 5. Poorly maintained watertight doors are dangerous. Shipboard planned maintenance systems should be designed and followed to ensure that watertight doors are maintained in accordance with manufacturers’ instructions, and in accordance with good standard marine engineering practice.
  12. 12. END OF SLIDE SHOW THANK YOU

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