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PLATO - educating students about plagiarism, and citing and referencing information sources. Martindale

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Presented at LILAC 2007

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PLATO - educating students about plagiarism, and citing and referencing information sources. Martindale

  1. 1. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference PLATO PLAgiarism Teaching Online Chris Martindale Faculty Support Team Manager Learning & Information Services University of Derby
  2. 2. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference PLATO – PLAgiarism Teaching Online Question “How do you make a £1.6m a year and drive a Ferrari?” Answer “Sell essays for £400” Education Guardian 29/07/2006 One in ten students admitted to searching for model essays on the internet according to a THES Survey in 2006
  3. 3. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference PLATO – PLAgiarism Teaching Online Student plagiarism 'on the rise' BBC 11/02/05 “A rise in the number of students in the UK, including undergraduates from overseas, is likely to mean increased plagiarism” Deterring, Detecting and Dealing with Student Plagiarism 2005 "A decision to plagiarise may be associated with increasing pressures on students arising from, for example, undertaking paid work, heavier coursework load, or lack of personal organisation skills.” op.cit. "When stresses rise, students see plagiarism as a reasonable and reasonably risk-free way out of difficulties." op.cit.
  4. 4. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference PLATO – PLAgiarism Teaching Online “Academic offences!, academic integrity!” …..what’s all the fuss about?………………… So what is plagiarism……………………? Plagiarism is the “The taking and using as one’s own of the thoughts, writings or inventions of another” Shorter Oxford English Dictionary 1944 3rd edition “Submitting someone else’s work as your own” Jude Carroll, 2007 “Submitting”………………………………Giving the appearance of compliance to academia “Someone’s work”…………………………What is the work? + who owns it? (Wikis, Blogs etc) “as your own”………………………………’Originality’ – without a quotation & citation “I found that the notion of cardinal literary virtue of newness was at odds with my own sense of difficulty in achieving that newness” Laura B. Spencer 2004
  5. 5. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference PLATO – PLAgiarism Teaching Online “““Every generation has the privilege of standing on the shoulders of the generation that went before; but it has no right to pick the pockets of the first comer” Brander Matthews Recreations of an Anthologist 1967 The quality of academic writing must go beyond description to analysis, synthesis and evaluation. This forces the need for writing, time management and information literacy skills ‘drowning in information, and thirsting for wisdom’
  6. 6. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference PLATO – PLAgiarism Teaching Online Some additional issues • Is plagiarism deliberate or genuinely accidental? Intent? • The language adopted can be academic “malpractice” – “cheats” + “offenders” + “detection” should students be treated like criminals? • Are International students more likely to commit plagiarism? Cultural aspects of learning and IELT issues • Needed! A shared understanding of what “academic integrity” and what plagiarism really means!
  7. 7. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference How is the need to understand plagiarism relevant to Information Literacy? “Information Literacy Outcome 5, is that students should understand economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information; and they should access and use information ethically and legally. Outcomes could include describing censorship or identifying plagiarism. “ Information Literacy Project Team 2006 (Kings College)
  8. 8. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference PLATO – PLAgiarism Teaching Online “ “Local police launch new crime initiative!” “Is PLATO intended to teach students how to plagiarise!?”
  9. 9. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference PLATO – PLAgiarism Teaching Online Background to PLATO 23,000 students at the University of Derby Third part time & over 40% over 21yrs old Largest no. of Learning Through Work stdts. in the UK There are 500 purely e-learning students. PLATO initiated from research with P.G. students Confusion over what plagiarism is. Action needed a strong need for an educational tool
  10. 10. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference PLATO – PLAgiarism Teaching Online • Some of the other findings included…………………….. • A strong belief in the need for academic integrity • An awareness of risks of the ease of “copy and paste” • A wide variety of diverse educational experience • Pressure points – time mgt., fear of failure • Lack of confidence in skill sets • Lack of technical knowledge e.g. “how do I cite in the text?”
  11. 11. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference PLATO – PLAgiarism Teaching Online Aims • To build skills at referencing • Address cultural & diversity issues • Enable different levels of access • Immediate responses to diagnostic tests • Encourage reflection by problem solving • Clear direction to sources of support
  12. 12. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference PLATO – PLAgiarism Teaching Online How was this achieved? By developing skills through: • Using diverse media: animation, audio & video • Diagnostic testing to enable progression • Varied entry level for beginners/advanced learners • Advanced referencing section for wider examples Navigation on screen by “point & click” • Multiple choice questions • True or false • Drag & drop selection
  13. 13. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference A multiple route approach PLATO – PLAgiarism Teaching Online • A multiple route approach to developing skills
  14. 14. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference Identifying plagiarism behaviour PLATO – PLAgiarism Teaching Online
  15. 15. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference Inclusive of Learners from diverse backgrounds PLATO – PLAgiarism Teaching Online
  16. 16. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference PLATO – PLAgiarism Teaching Online • Link
  17. 17. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference PLATO – PLAgiarism Teaching Online • PLATO
  18. 18. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference PLATO – PLAgiarism Teaching Online Previous instruction about how to avoid plagiarism Recent survey of International Postgraduate Students almost 50% at pre-entry level had not been shown how to avoid plagiarism Evaluation 75% - rated PLATO “easy to use” 60% - found PLATO “very helpful” in learning about how to avoid plagiarism Comments from International Post Graduate students “Its use of real examples” “Very helpful, a good idea” “It deters you from any form of cheating” and “gives you confidence on how to reference”
  19. 19. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference PLATO – PLAgiarism Teaching Online Future developments • PLATO introduced in December 2006 • Courseware evaluation – January 2007 • New version planned for July 2007 • Address full accessibility • Further study skills • Develop audio & visual presentation • Wider use of examples video • Involvement of Faculty & S.U. stakeholders
  20. 20. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference PLATO – PLAgiarism Teaching Online Partnership across the University – Learning technologists – Academic staff – Learning support staff “ I found PLATO easy to use and easy to understand because of the animation guide was fun to do and very direct and simple” Heny Tanu, PG student March 2006
  21. 21. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference Your solution could be PLATO PLAgiarism Teaching Online
  22. 22. 26/03/97 LILAC Conference PLATO – PLAgiarism Teaching Online Thank you for listening Enjoy trying PLATO out for yourselves. http://www.preventplagiarism.co.uk c.martindale@derby.ac.uk

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