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Humanizing Online Learning: the Secret Sauce for Student Success

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Shared with Moorpark College online faculty on January 7, 2016.

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Humanizing Online Learning: the Secret Sauce for Student Success

  1. 1. Except where otherwise noted, content in this presentation is licensed by Michelle Pacansky-Brock under a Creative Commons-Attribution-Non Commercial 4.0 License. —> tiny.cc/humanize-moorpark <—
  2. 2. Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY-NC
  3. 3. CALIFORNIA’S FUTURE -1 MILLIONEDUCATED WORKERS BY 2025 Johnson, H; Sengupta, R, (2009). Closing the Gap: Meeting California’s Need for College Graduates, Public Policy Institute of California, retrieved from http://www.ppic.org/main/ publication.asp?i=835
  4. 4. CALIFORNIA’S FUTURE TRANSFER LATINO(A)
  5. 5. transfers to a 4-year college 1 attend community college 19 attend 4-yr college 10 earn doctoral degree .4 earn graduate degree 4 graduate with a 4-year degree 10 enroll in college 29 graduate high school 52 100 elementary school students Latina/o National Educational Pipeline U.S. Census Bureau, 2000.
  6. 6. White Hispanic Unknown/Declined to State 2+ Races Native American Filipino Black Asian/Pacific Islander California Community College Chancellor’s Office, (2013). Distance Education Report. Distance Education Students California Community Colleges by Race/Ethnicity
  7. 7. AVERAGE GRADES California Community Colleges Kaupp, R. (2012) Online penalty: The White-Latino achievement gap, Journal of Applied Research in the Community College, 19(2), 8-16. 0 0.55 1.1 1.65 2.2 Latino White Latino-White Gap F2F Online n= 4,472,736 +44% increase online
  8. 8. n=10 Describe “good” and “bad” past experiences and experiences in current online class. Latino Online Students Why do online classes exacerbate the White-Latino achievement gap? n=12 Online Instructors & Administrators responsible for administering online instruction Kaupp, R. (2012) Online penalty: The White-Latino achievement gap, Journal of Applied Research in the Community College, 19(2), 8-16. • motivation/self-directedness • lack of technology skills •literacy • good learning experiences characterized by strong, respectful instructor relationships • lack of a relationship with online instructors
  9. 9. The lens we use informs our understanding. Photo by Jeremy Noble CC-BY
  10. 10. ALAS • CI grant-based program with regional and local (CI) components • Focus: • Strengthen 2-year to 4-year curricular pathways • Promote transfer student success by aligning high-impact curricular practices, systems, and policies across institutions • Objective: • To increase transfer rates, transfer readiness, and completion of a 4-year degree for all transfer students, particilarly historically underserved students (i.e., low- income, first-generation, and Latinas/os). 2-year 4-year
  11. 11. • Improve regional transfer success • Institutional collaboration between CSU Channel Islands and Santa Barbara City College • For full-time, 2-year students with goal of transferring • Embedded in GE courses: SBCC students receive online support and community from peer mentors who have transferred to CI from a CC • Additional program benefits • small classes active learning • priority registration • dedicated academic counselor 2-year 4-year ALAS iPath Program
  12. 12. Supporting Faculty
  13. 13. Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY-NC
  14. 14. Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY-NC
  15. 15. Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY-NC
  16. 16. Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY-NC
  17. 17. Online Teaching Preparation Program (OTPP)
  18. 18. 2ingredientsof socializing online learning
  19. 19. presence instructor 1 visible Savery, (2005). actively engaged aware of and sensitive to student needs #tilttip14
  20. 20. #tilttip14 social presence 2
  21. 21. student satisfaction (Gunawardena & Zittle, 1997; Rovai & Barnum, 2003) interaction (Tu, 2000; Stein & Wanstreet, 2003) depth of learning (Picciano, 2002; Richardson & Swan, 2003; Rovai & Barnum, 2003) social presence 2
  22. 22. 2 "the degree to which participants are able to project themselves affectively within the medium" (Garrison, 1997, p. 6) presence issocial "degree to which a person is perceived as a 'real' person in mediated communication" "the degree of person to person awareness" (Tu, 2000, p. 1662) sense of belonging to a community (Picciano, 2002) "feeling that others are involved in the communication process" (Whiteman, 2002, p. 6)
  23. 23. http://tiny.cc/howtohumanizeSlides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY-NC
  24. 24. AFFECTIVECOGNITIVE LEARNING DOMAINS (Anderson & Krathwohl, 2001; Krathwohl, Bloom, & Masia, 1964).
  25. 25. Course Design Facilitation ● presence ● empathy ● awareness ● choice ● challenge ● control ● collaboration ● constructing meaning ● consequences (Wang & Han, 2001) Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY-NC
  26. 26. Don’t be a robot. PRESENCE Photo by Thomas Hawk CC-BY-NC Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY-NC
  27. 27. How does it feel to be a student in this type of learning environment? Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY-NC
  28. 28. Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY-NC
  29. 29. Don’t be a robot. PRESENCE EMPATHY Photo by Christian Bernal CC-BY-NC-ND Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY-NC
  30. 30. AWARENESS Know your students’ needs. Photo by Christian Bernal CC-BY-NC-ND Photo by Sergiu Bocioiu CC-BY-NC Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY-NC
  31. 31. Tell stories. Photo by neliO. CC-BY-NC-ND Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY-NC
  32. 32. Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY-NC Stephens, G. J., Silbert, L. J., & Hasson, U. (2010). Speaker-listener neural coupling underlies successful communication. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in the United States of America, 107(32), 14425-14430. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1008662107
  33. 33. Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY-NC Stephens, G. J., Silbert, L. J., & Hasson, U. (2010). Speaker-listener neural coupling underlies successful communication. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in the United States of America, 107(32), 14425-14430. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1008662107
  34. 34. Stephens, G. J., Silbert, L. J., & Hasson, U. (2010). Speaker-listener neural coupling underlies successful communication. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in the United States of America, 107(32), 14425-14430. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1008662107 neural coupling Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY-NC
  35. 35. CC-BY Gustavo Devito Embrace the power of the human voice.
  36. 36. Make it visual. Photo by David Martin. CC-BY-NC-SA Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY-NC
  37. 37. A humanized syllabus! tiny.cc/humanized-syllabus Populr.me (upgrade to educator account)
  38. 38. A humanized syllabus! http://jaimehannans.populr.me/nurse222 by Dr. Jaime Hannans
  39. 39. http://tiny.cc/syllabus-gallery
  40. 40. comment in voice, video, or text conversations around media (images, presentation slides, videos, and more) asynchronous
  41. 41. central media comments navigation controls Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY
  42. 42. ENGLISH StaceyAnderson,CSUChannelIslands (sharedwithpermission) Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY
  43. 43. StaceyAnderson,CSUChannelIslands (sharedwithpermission) SPANISH AraceliTrujillo,CSUChannelIslands (sharedwithpermission)
  44. 44. https://youtu.be/zp_oTrotgX8
  45. 45. - online student (Pacansky-Brock, 2014.) Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY-NC
  46. 46. Makes me feel connected to my peers. 86% n=109 “I feel like we got to know each other better. I actually recognized a classmate at my children's Taekwondo class because of the sound of her voice!” Based on anonymous student surveys conducted by Michelle Pacansky-Brock. All students were enrolled in a fully online History of Photography community college class. Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY Learning Out LoudLearning Out Loud
  47. 47. Listening to peers increases my ability to reach the learning objectives. 95% n=82 “Listening gave me a better understanding of the material. … you could actually hear the passion in the speakers’ voices.…” Based on anonymous student surveys conducted by Michelle Pacansky-Brock. All students were enrolled in a fully online History of Photography community college class. Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY Learning Out LoudLearning Out Loud
  48. 48. When I spoke, I remembered the information better. 83% n=82 “…it made me re-evaluate my answers. Mostly because I didn't want to sound like I had no idea what I was talking about. …being able to speak … my ideas made me feel like I could … explain the material better.” Based on anonymous student surveys conducted by Michelle Pacansky-Brock. All students were enrolled in a fully online History of Photography community college class. Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY Learning Out LoudLearning Out Loud
  49. 49. When I spoke, I remembered the information better. 83% n=82 “I found ... that I would ... unearth more thoughts … as I spoke them out loud while looking at the content, as opposed to looking at the content, forming an opinion, then looking at my text as I wrote it.” Based on anonymous student surveys conducted by Michelle Pacansky-Brock. All students were enrolled in a fully online History of Photography community college class. Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY Learning Out LoudLearning Out Loud
  50. 50. Photo by Michael W. May CC-BY-NC-ND. Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY “None really, other than me tripping over my tongue and having to re-record a lot. But that gets better as you get more comfortable with it.” DRAWBACKS?
  51. 51. “For me, working them around my noisy (and consistently busy) family and house. I also had to buy a microphone for my comments, but acquiring materials is just a part of school.”.” DRAWBACKS? Photo by Michael W. May CC-BY-NC-ND. Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY
  52. 52. Slides by Michelle Pacansky-Brock CC-BY-NC
  53. 53. Photo by Leo Reynolds. CC-BY-NC-SA michelle.pacansky-brock@csuci.edu
  54. 54. Credits Special thanks to all the people who made and released these awesome resources for free: Minicons by Webalys Presentation template by SlidesCarnival Photographs by Unsplash
  55. 55. Presentation design This presentation uses the following typographies and colors: Titles: Nixie One Body copy: Varela Round You can download the fonts on this page: http://www.google.com/fonts/#UsePlace:use/Collection:Nixie+One|Varela+Round Click on the “arrow button” that appears on the top right Yellow #f8bb00 Orange #ed4a00 Fucsia #e8004c Blue #00acc3 Aqua #00d1c6 Lime #bbcd00 Green #65bb48 Gray #617a86 Light Gray #a1becc You don’t need to keep this slide in your presentation. It’s only here to serve you as a design guide if you need to create new slides or download the fonts to edit the presentation in PowerPoint®
  56. 56. Minicons Free Vector Icons Pack by Webalys is published under a Creative Commons Attribution license and Free for both personal and commercial use. You can copy, adapt, remix, distribute or transmit it. If you use this set on your presentation remember to keep the “Credits” slide or provide a mention of this "Minicons Free Vector Icons Pack" and a link back to this page: http://www.webalys.com/minicons

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