Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Policy Tools for Clean Innovation
David Popp
June 2016
Introduction
• While penetration of renewable energy sources is growing, 
achieving significant reductions in carbon emiss...
Technological Change & the Environment
• Technological change proceeds in three stages:
– Invention: an idea must be born
...
Technological Change & the Environment
• At all three stages, market forces provide insufficient 
incentives for the devel...
Technological Change & the Environment
• At all three stages, market forces provide insufficient 
incentives for the devel...
The Role of Policy
• Both environmental policy and R&D policy are needed
– Environmental policy creates a demand for clean...
1) Environmental Policy Creates Incentives for Innovation
• Innovation responds quickly to incentives
– Newell et al. (199...
U.S. NOX Post‐Comb. Treatment Patents
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
1967 1972 1977 1982 1987 1992 1997
p rio rity year
number
...
David Popp
Source: Dechezleprêtre et al. (2009)
Innovation and Climate Policy
0
.005
.01
.015
.02Shareofclimate-relatedinv...
David Popp
Alternative energy patents over time
2) Design of Policy Instruments
• A wide‐range of environmental policy instruments are used
– Command & Control (CAC) poli...
2) Design of Policy Instruments
• Economists tend to prefer market‐based regulation over 
command‐and‐control options beca...
65
70
75
80
85
90
95
100
75 78 81 84 87 90 93 96
year FGD unit intsalled
removalefficiency--3yearmovingaverage
David Popp
...
2) Design of Policy Instruments
• How to develop long‐term technologies?
– Problems such as climate change will require a ...
2) Design of Policy Instruments
• Policies that let the market “pick winners” will focus research 
efforts on technologies...
3) The Role of Energy R&D
• While R&D policy plays a role, remember it is not a substitute 
for environmental policy 
• Wh...
3) The Role of Energy R&D
• Can government funds increase commercialization?
– Howell (2015) finds that US DOE SBIR grants...
3) The Role of Energy R&D
• When evaluating public R&D, patience is important
– Lags between funding and publication are l...
4) Technology Transfer
• Keep in mind that policy matters
– Technology transfer won’t occur unless there is demand for cle...
David Popp
Source: Popp, forthcoming CD Howe policy brief
First filing country, USPTO patents from top patenting sources
W...
4) Technology Transfer
• Keep in mind that policy matters
– Technology transfer won’t occur unless there is demand for cle...
Conclusion
• Summary of key points
– Incentives matter
– Both broad‐based and targeted policies needed
• Targeted policies...
Thank You!
David Popp
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

David Popp, Syracuse University

151 views

Published on

Policy Tools for Clean Innovation

Published in: Environment
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

David Popp, Syracuse University

  1. 1. Policy Tools for Clean Innovation David Popp June 2016
  2. 2. Introduction • While penetration of renewable energy sources is growing,  achieving significant reductions in carbon emissions requires  further development and deployment • Innovation is needed to: – Reduce the cost of existing technologies – Develop new breakthrough technologies – Develop complementary technologies (e.g. grid management, energy  storage) to better integrate intermittent renewables into transmission  grids • This talk highlights key lessons from research on policy and  innovation David Popp
  3. 3. Technological Change & the Environment • Technological change proceeds in three stages: – Invention: an idea must be born – Innovation: new ideas are then developed into commercially viable  products • Often, these two stages of technological change are lumped together  under the rubric of research and development (R&D) – Diffusion: to have an effect on the economy, individuals must choose  to make use of the innovation David Popp
  4. 4. Technological Change & the Environment • At all three stages, market forces provide insufficient  incentives for the development and diffusion of  environmentally‐friendly technologies – Environmental Externalities • Pollution created in the production or use of a product are not normally  included in the price of the product • Thus, neither firms nor consumers have incentive to reduce pollution  on their own • This  limits the market for technologies that reduce emissions, which in  turn reduces the incentives to develop such technologies • Note that there may be some private benefits (e.g. lower fuel costs,  increased demand from green consumers), so demand is not  necessarily zero • Addressed by environmental policy David Popp
  5. 5. Technological Change & the Environment • At all three stages, market forces provide insufficient  incentives for the development and diffusion of  environmentally‐friendly technologies – Environmental Externalities – Knowledge as a Public Good • New technologies must be made available to the public for the inventor to  profit • When this happens, some or all of the knowledge that makes up the  invention also becomes available to the public. • Public knowledge may lead to knowledge spillovers—additional  innovations, or even to copies of the current innovations, that provide  benefits to the public as a whole, but not to the innovator • Addressed by science and technology policy • May be general (IP) or specific (subsidies for renewable R&D) David Popp
  6. 6. The Role of Policy • Both environmental policy and R&D policy are needed – Environmental policy creates a demand for clean technologies – This demand creates incentives for climate‐friendly innovation • R&D policy can help lower the costs of climate policies  – While R&D policy plays a role, it is not a substitute for environmental  policy  – R&D policy can help with the development of technologies, but not with  the diffusion of technologies David Popp
  7. 7. 1) Environmental Policy Creates Incentives for Innovation • Innovation responds quickly to incentives – Newell et al. (1999) & Popp (2002) both find most of the response of R&D  to higher energy prices occurs within 5 years – Responses to policy are even faster David Popp
  8. 8. U.S. NOX Post‐Comb. Treatment Patents 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 1967 1972 1977 1982 1987 1992 1997 p rio rity year number U S F oreign Japan G erm any Source: Popp (2006) David Popp
  9. 9. David Popp Source: Dechezleprêtre et al. (2009) Innovation and Climate Policy 0 .005 .01 .015 .02Shareofclimate-relatedinventions 1978 1983 1988 1993 1998 2003 Year USA & Australia Other Annex 1 countries
  10. 10. David Popp Alternative energy patents over time
  11. 11. 2) Design of Policy Instruments • A wide‐range of environmental policy instruments are used – Command & Control (CAC) policies provide specific performance  targets – Market‐based policies establish a price for emissions • Either directly (e.g. a carbon tax) or indirectly (e.g. through the use of  tradable permits) David Popp
  12. 12. 2) Design of Policy Instruments • Economists tend to prefer market‐based regulation over  command‐and‐control options because they provide greater  incentives for innovation – Command‐and‐control regulation provides incentives to meet, but not  exceed, standards (Popp 2003) – In contrast, market‐based options provide rewards for continual  improvement David Popp
  13. 13. 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 75 78 81 84 87 90 93 96 year FGD unit intsalled removalefficiency--3yearmovingaverage David Popp Source: Popp (2003) Removal Efficiency of New FGD Units
  14. 14. 2) Design of Policy Instruments • How to develop long‐term technologies? – Problems such as climate change will require a diverse  range of technologies – Will market‐based policies produce a diverse range? • Policy options Technology neutral • Carbon tax • Cap‐and‐trade • Renewable Energy Certificates/Renewable Portfolio Standards Technology‐specific • Feed‐in tariffs • Investment subsidies David Popp
  15. 15. 2) Design of Policy Instruments • Policies that let the market “pick winners” will focus research  efforts on technologies closest to market (Johnstone et al. 2010) – Renewable energy mandates => wind innovation – Guaranteed prices (e.g. feed‐in tariffs) => solar innovation – Consider, for example, solar energy in Germany • However, policies that promote specific technologies may increase  short‐run compliance costs • Solutions? – Combine broad‐based policies with limited subsidies for technologies  furthest from market (Fischer et al., RFF Working Paper, 2013) – Use government R&D to support long‐term research needs (Acemoglu et  al. JPE 2016) David Popp
  16. 16. 3) The Role of Energy R&D • While R&D policy plays a role, remember it is not a substitute  for environmental policy  • Which technologies? – To avoid duplicating, and potentially crowding‐out, private research  efforts, government R&D support should focus on: • basic research • technologies not yet close to market • applied research whose benefits are difficult to capture through market  activity – E.g. improved electricity transmission, energy storage David Popp
  17. 17. 3) The Role of Energy R&D • Can government funds increase commercialization? – Howell (2015) finds that US DOE SBIR grants help small firms bring  technologies to market by funding technology prototypes – Grant recipients are: • 2X as likely to receive subsequent venture capital • Produce more patents • Earn more revenue David Popp
  18. 18. 3) The Role of Energy R&D • When evaluating public R&D, patience is important – Lags between funding and publication are long (Popp 2016) • 6‐10 years for full effect of funding • An additional 3‐5 years for articles to generate new patent applications • Evaluating public R&D requires patience from policymakers – R&D is uncertain; some projects will fail David Popp
  19. 19. 4) Technology Transfer • Keep in mind that policy matters – Technology transfer won’t occur unless there is demand for clean  technologies in the recipient countries • Two key points for North America: 1. The U.S. market is key for creating demand • While both domestic and foreign policies promote innovation activity,  foreign markets are larger • In most OECD countries, overall effect of foreign demand on innovation is  twice as large as domestic demand (Dechezleprêtre and Glachant 2014) • Particularly important for Canada – U.S. market much larger than the local market David Popp
  20. 20. David Popp Source: Popp, forthcoming CD Howe policy brief First filing country, USPTO patents from top patenting sources Wind Number of Patents % filed at home % filed US United States 1542 99.3 N/A Germany 377 78.5 13.5 Japan 144 78.5 2.8 Denmark 137 54.7 7.3 Canada 122 17.2 81.2 Solar Number of Patents % filed at home % filed US United States 4556 99.6 N/A Japan 1105 96.3 1.7 Germany 422 91.9 2.8 France 148 93.2 3.4 Australia 121 86.8 12.4 Switzerland 86 67.4 8.1 Israel 99 49.5 48.5 Canada 96 17.7 73.9
  21. 21. 4) Technology Transfer • Keep in mind that policy matters – Technology transfer won’t occur unless there is demand for clean  technologies in the recipient countries • Two key points for North America: 1. The U.S. market is key for creating demand 2. Technology transfer can increase adoption of regulation • As technologies improve, the costs of environmental regulation fall • International trade improves access to technology, leading to earlier  adoption of regulation (Lovely & Popp, JEEM, 2011) David Popp
  22. 22. Conclusion • Summary of key points – Incentives matter – Both broad‐based and targeted policies needed • Targeted policies should focus on what market‐based policies won’t deliver – Use public R&D to complement the private sector – U.S. market is key for North America David Popp
  23. 23. Thank You! David Popp

×