Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
U.S. Clean Power Plan
Tim Profeta
Director, Nicholas Institute
North American Climate Policy Forum
June 22, 2016
Agenda
• Basic Structure of the Clean Power Plan
• Sources of Uncertainty in CPP implementation
• Possible paths forward
Agenda
• Basic Structure of the Clean Power Plan
• Sources of Uncertainty in CPP implementation
• Possible paths forward
CLEAN POWER PLAN OVERVIEW
Best System of Emission Reduction 
(BSER) Building Blocks
• BB1: Heat rate improvements 
at existing coal units
• BB2: Inc...
EPA Translates the 
Emissions Guidelines into 4 forms
Subcategorized 
Rate
Blended
Rate
Mass –
Existing Only
Mass –
Existi...
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
2028
2029
2030
2031
CPP Final Rule
Initial State 
Submiss...
State Plan Choices: Key QuestionsThis image cannot currently be displayed.
Mass vs. Rate?
How to distribute allowances?
Ho...
Mass or Rate?
Mass
• Administratively simpler
• Allowance supply is pre‐
determined; allocation is a 
state decision.
• Po...
Mass Based Trading Basics 
State plan creates # of allowances in each compliance period = total emissions budget 
1 allowa...
Rate‐Based Trading Basics
Measure:
lbs of CO2 & output (MWh)
Lbs/MWh = unadjusted rate
Below standard  Earn ERCs
Above st...
Role of Canada and Mexico in CPP
• Can generate ERC’s if grid is linked
• No provision for trading off allowances
• Provis...
Agenda
• Basic Structure of the Clean Power Plan
• Sources of Uncertainty in CPP 
implementation
• Possible paths forward
CLEAN POWER PLAN LAWSUIT:
WEST VIRGINIA V. EPA (NO. 15‐1363)
Who is Involved?
Challengers (Petitioners)
27 States
90 Industry groups, utilities, and co‐ops
Supporters (Intervenors)
19...
What are the Issues?
1. Senate versus House version of Section 111(d) of the 
Clean Air Act
2. Outside‐the‐fence‐line meas...
WV v. EPA Status
• Stayed by Sup Ct, 5‐4, but then Scalia passed
• Under consideration by DC Cir – forewent 6/2 
hearing b...
What are the Potential Outcomes?
Rule Invalid
EPA goes back to 
drawing board
Rule Partially 
Invalid
Clean Power 
Plan Re...
2016 Presidential Election
Source: CNN
Agenda
• Basic Structure of the Clean Power Plan
• Sources of Uncertainty in CPP implementation
• Possible paths forward
THREE FUTURES?
Future 1:  Regulatory Path
• Court upholds 111 authority
• EPA expands CPP efforts to other sectors
• Possible use of 115 ...
Future 2: Clean Air Act Reform Path
• Allow CPP to go forward but amend Act to 
allow for more effective and efficient 
re...
Future 3:  Grand Bargain Path
• Replace regulatory authority with clean 
carbon pricing regime
• With Waxman/Markey failur...
Thank you!
Tim.Profeta@duke.edu
https://nicholasinstitute.duke.edu/focal‐areas/clean‐air‐act‐
clean‐power‐plan
APPENDICES
Clean Energy Incentive Program (CEIP)
Optional early action program in 2020 and 2021
CEIP Eligible Resources:
Any wind or ...
Leakage
• “Leakage” is a general term
• “Leakage” states must address in the Clean 
Power Plan is  more narrow
Policy 
Sco...
Leakage
Rate‐based plans cannot include new sources for 
compliance, so EPA is not worried about leakage
Mass‐based plans ...
Trading‐Ready
What is “Trading Ready”?
Allows EGUs and others to trade compliance instruments with 
the same definition an...
Proposed Model Rules
• The EPA has proposed mass‐ and rate‐based model 
rules and federal plans
• EPA aims to finalize mod...
PROPOSED MODEL RULES:
MASS‐BASED MODEL RULE
Pathways
Mass
Address 
Leakage Risk
Cover New Units
Existing EGUs 
Only
Existing & New 
Source 
Complement
State Measures ...
Mass Allowance Allocations
• The plans create allowances equal to a state’s mass 
goal
• EPA wants states to determine the...
Allocation Set‐asides
EPA is proposing three set‐asides for the 
federal plan and model rule
1. Clean Energy Incentive Pro...
Key Points in Mass‐Based Model Rule
• Existing Sources Only, Uses Allowance Allocation 
to Address Leakage
• Trading Ready...
PROPOSED MODEL RULES:
RATE‐BASED MODEL RULE
Pathways
Rate
Define
Eligible 
ERCs
Sub‐categorized 
Rate
State‐wide 
(blend) Rate
State Defined 
Rates
MODEL 
RULE
Can be...
Emission Rate Credits (ERCs)
There are three categories that can generate ERCs:
1. Affected EGUs operating below subcatego...
Zero‐Emitting ERCs 
Model Rule proposal
• All wind
• All solar (including distributed)
• Geothermal
• Hydropower
• Qualifi...
ERC Issuance Process
42
Step 1: Project 
developer submits 
application to state  
with EM&V plan and 
third party verific...
Key Points in Rate‐Based Model Rule
• Uses subcategorized rates
• Trading ready
• Uses EPA tracking system
• ERCs can be b...
KEY CHOICES FOR STATES
Emissions Standards or
State Measures Plan?
• Emissions Standards: Compliance obligation 
entirely on affected units.
• St...
Mass or Rate?
Mass
• Administratively simpler
• Allowance supply is pre‐
determined; allocation is a 
state decision.
• Po...
47
Existing Sources Only
Existing Unit New Unit
Existing Plus New
Must hold 
allowances
No requirement to 
hold allowances...
Mass‐Based Plans and Leakage
3 options available to states
1. Cover new sources
2. Use an allocation method that counterac...
New Source Complements 
Cumulative National Increase 
in Interim Goal  Budget
National Increase in Final 
Goal Budget
1.8%...
Mass‐Based Plans and Leakage
Cover New Sources
• Covering new sources does 
not limit load growth. 
• Does limit emissions...
Allowance Distribution 
in Mass‐Based Plans
States have discretion to distribute allowances, so long 
as leakage is adequa...
Mass: Alternative Ways to Distribute Allowances
Common Options Rationale Examples
ALLOCATE FOR FREE
* “Grandfathering”: Gi...
Rate: Emission Rate Credits
• What types of resources can earn credits?
– State discretion other than new sources, offsets...
Scope of Trading?
• Proposes to allow federal plan states to trade 
with similar approved state plans using EPA 
tracking ...
Trading Partners?
Thank you!
Julie.DeMeester@duke.edu
Sarah.Adair@duke.edu
Christina.Reichert@duke.edu
https://nicholasinstitute.duke.edu/fo...
Rate Based State Plans –
(Non‐Exhaustive)
Rate Based Model 
Rule
Rate Based 
Federal Plan 
Clean Energy 
Incentive Program...
Biomass in the Clean Power Plan
Mass Based Plan
• EPA seeking comment on 
inclusion of biomass as an 
eligible measure in ...
Requirements for Biomass 
in State Plans 
To include biogenic feedstocks in plans*, states must:
• Address types of biogen...
States
Alabama
Arizona Corporation Commission
Arkansas
Colorado
Florida
Georgia
Indiana
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Louisian...
Supporters in the CPP Lawsuit
States
California
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Hawaii
Illinois
Iowa
Maine
Maryl...
Nicholas Institute Modeling of the Clean Power Plan
Integral part of work with state decision makers
Goal: provide informa...
Output‐based Allocation Set‐Aside
• This set‐aside is intended to address leakage by 
encouraging existing NGCC
• EPA has ...
Output‐based Allocation Set‐Aside to 
Address Leakage
There is a lagged accounting method
• NGCC units earn output‐based a...
RE Set‐Aside to Address Leakage
• 5% allowances in model rule
• In‐state: utility‐scale wind, solar (any), geothermal and ...
RE Set‐aside
• The distribution of the allowances happens at the 
beginning of each year (before the RE has been 
generate...
CEIP set‐aside
• For early‐action EE and RE in 2020 and 
2021
• The state‐match allowances are pulled 
from the first inte...
Example of all Mass Set‐Asides
a RE set‐aside proposed to grow as EGUs retire
Example of allowance set‐asides for South Ca...
Affected EGU ERCs Accounting Example
Example 1:
An NGCC facility with an average emissions rate of 700 that generates 
1,0...
Gas‐Shift ERCs
• GS‐ERCs can be created by all existing NGCC
• GS‐ERCs are independent of the NGCC standard and 
can be us...
Gas Shift‐ERC Equation*
*in federal plan proposal
The GS‐ERC Emission Factor represents how much 
lower an individual NGCC...
Clean Energy Incentive Program
What ERCs to retire?
• ERCs must be created
• Pull ERCs from CEIP recipient? 
2020 2021 202...
Clean Energy Incentive Program
EPA providing credits/allowances from 300 million ton pool
State provides matching credits/...
Trading Options in State Plan Pathways
Multi‐State Plan 
with Defined Trading 
Partners and 
Multi‐State Goal
Intra‐state ...
Why Trade?
1. Electrons do not stop at state borders
• Flexibility to manage grid
2. Cost
• Wider markets tend to lower ov...
0
500
1000
1500
2000
WV
KY
TN
SC
NC
AR
LA
GA
AL
MS
VA
FL
Carbon EmissionsRate (lbs/MWh)
Proposed Goal Final Goal
Decreased...
Source: 
https://www3.epa.gov/climatechange
/ghgemissions/sources.html
EPA’s MAPPING OF THE STATE PLAN APPROACH OPTIONS
Tim Profeta, Director Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Tim Profeta, Director Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions

279 views

Published on

U.S. Clean Power Plan

Published in: Environment
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Tim Profeta, Director Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions

  1. 1. U.S. Clean Power Plan Tim Profeta Director, Nicholas Institute North American Climate Policy Forum June 22, 2016
  2. 2. Agenda • Basic Structure of the Clean Power Plan • Sources of Uncertainty in CPP implementation • Possible paths forward
  3. 3. Agenda • Basic Structure of the Clean Power Plan • Sources of Uncertainty in CPP implementation • Possible paths forward
  4. 4. CLEAN POWER PLAN OVERVIEW
  5. 5. Best System of Emission Reduction  (BSER) Building Blocks • BB1: Heat rate improvements  at existing coal units • BB2: Increasing generation  from existing natural gas  combined cycle • BB3: Increasing renewable  generation 2030  Final rate Fossil steam NGCC lbs/MWh lbs/MWh Eastern 1305 771 Western 360 690 ERCOT 237 697
  6. 6. EPA Translates the  Emissions Guidelines into 4 forms Subcategorized  Rate Blended Rate Mass – Existing Only Mass – Existing + New Allowances Emission Rate Credits
  7. 7. 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031 CPP Final Rule Initial State  Submission Final Plan  Submission Clean  Energy  Incentive  Program Interim  Step  1 Interim  Step 2  Interim  Step 3  Final rate Original CPP Compliance Timeline • States have until September 6, 2016 to submit an initial plan • Final plan due September 6, 2018
  8. 8. State Plan Choices: Key QuestionsThis image cannot currently be displayed. Mass vs. Rate? How to distribute allowances? How to address leakage? Trading Ready? Degree of trading? Trading Partners?Photo: thedailyomivore.net Emissions Standards vs.  State Measures? Emission Rate Credit Issuance and Supply? 
  9. 9. Mass or Rate? Mass • Administratively simpler • Allowance supply is pre‐ determined; allocation is a  state decision. • Potentially easier to build  upon for future policies • Environmental outcomes  depend on leakage Rate • ERC administration  potentially significant lift,  especially for efficiency • ERC supply is uncertain • Allocates financial incentive  to ERC developer • More or less stringent than  mass?
  10. 10. Mass Based Trading Basics  State plan creates # of allowances in each compliance period = total emissions budget  1 allowance = 1 (short) ton of emissions Establish tracking system & method of getting allowances into market To comply: Affected units measure their emissions in each compliance period Must surrender 1 allowance for every ton emitted  Affected  Units = X tons?  Allowance Permission  to Emit 1 Ton Allowance Permission  to Emit 1 Ton
  11. 11. Rate‐Based Trading Basics Measure: lbs of CO2 & output (MWh) Lbs/MWh = unadjusted rate Below standard  Earn ERCs Above standard  owe ERCs $ ERCs Affected  Unit ERC Eligible Resources
  12. 12. Role of Canada and Mexico in CPP • Can generate ERC’s if grid is linked • No provision for trading off allowances • Provision of low‐carbon power to U.S. demand  is incentivized
  13. 13. Agenda • Basic Structure of the Clean Power Plan • Sources of Uncertainty in CPP  implementation • Possible paths forward
  14. 14. CLEAN POWER PLAN LAWSUIT: WEST VIRGINIA V. EPA (NO. 15‐1363)
  15. 15. Who is Involved? Challengers (Petitioners) 27 States 90 Industry groups, utilities, and co‐ops Supporters (Intervenors) 19 States  8 Cities and counties  11 Non‐profit groups 6 Utilities 
  16. 16. What are the Issues? 1. Senate versus House version of Section 111(d) of the  Clean Air Act 2. Outside‐the‐fence‐line measures for the best system of  emissions reductions 3. New source standard for greenhouse gas emissions  emitted from natural gas and coal power plants 4. Constitutional & procedural challenges
  17. 17. WV v. EPA Status • Stayed by Sup Ct, 5‐4, but then Scalia passed • Under consideration by DC Cir – forewent 6/2  hearing by panel to have Sept. hearing en  banc • Opinion possible in late 2016 – but will Sup Ct  forego review?   • DC Cir #’s favor EPA, but recent precedent has  created erosion in deference to executive  branch
  18. 18. What are the Potential Outcomes? Rule Invalid EPA goes back to  drawing board Rule Partially  Invalid Clean Power  Plan Revisited Rule Upheld   Clean Power  Plan Moves  Forward 
  19. 19. 2016 Presidential Election Source: CNN
  20. 20. Agenda • Basic Structure of the Clean Power Plan • Sources of Uncertainty in CPP implementation • Possible paths forward
  21. 21. THREE FUTURES?
  22. 22. Future 1:  Regulatory Path • Court upholds 111 authority • EPA expands CPP efforts to other sectors • Possible use of 115 to attack other sectors, or  even power sector
  23. 23. Future 2: Clean Air Act Reform Path • Allow CPP to go forward but amend Act to  allow for more effective and efficient  regulation – Cross sectoral?  International trade? – Clear authority on creation of emissions limits
  24. 24. Future 3:  Grand Bargain Path • Replace regulatory authority with clean  carbon pricing regime • With Waxman/Markey failure still in  consciousness, cap‐and‐trade legislation  unlikely in near term • Carbon tax compromise is possible and oft‐ discussed
  25. 25. Thank you! Tim.Profeta@duke.edu https://nicholasinstitute.duke.edu/focal‐areas/clean‐air‐act‐ clean‐power‐plan
  26. 26. APPENDICES
  27. 27. Clean Energy Incentive Program (CEIP) Optional early action program in 2020 and 2021 CEIP Eligible Resources: Any wind or solar For every 2 MWh, project receives 1 credit  from EPA, 1 credit from state Energy efficiency in ‘low‐income  communities’  For every 2 MWh, project receives 2  credits from EPA, 2 credits from state Early action credits/allowances  granted certain renewables and  energy efficiency that commences  construction/operation after the  state plan is submitted for MWhs generated/saved in 2020 and 2021  EPA matching credits/allowances  Participating states must create own  pool of matching credits/allowances 
  28. 28. Leakage • “Leakage” is a general term • “Leakage” states must address in the Clean  Power Plan is  more narrow Policy  Scope Emissions Existing  Sources New Sources
  29. 29. Leakage Rate‐based plans cannot include new sources for  compliance, so EPA is not worried about leakage Mass‐based plans need to demonstrate they have  addressed risk of leakage to new sources in state plan 3 options available to states 1. Cover new sources 2. Use an allocation method that counteracts leakage  3. Other methods demonstrated by state to prevent  leakage
  30. 30. Trading‐Ready What is “Trading Ready”? Allows EGUs and others to trade compliance instruments with  the same definition and common tracking system with entities  in other states without a formal multistate agreement. Mass Subcategorized Rate Allowance representing 1  short ton of CO2 emissions Emission Rate Credit (ERC)  representing 1 MWh of zero  carbon generation or avoided  emissions *Mass can trade with mass and subcategorized rate with subcategorized rate.
  31. 31. Proposed Model Rules • The EPA has proposed mass‐ and rate‐based model  rules and federal plans • EPA aims to finalize model rules before the first state  submission in Sept 2016 • Both mass‐ and rate‐ are trading ready • Both include Clean Energy Incentive Program
  32. 32. PROPOSED MODEL RULES: MASS‐BASED MODEL RULE
  33. 33. Pathways Mass Address  Leakage Risk Cover New Units Existing EGUs  Only Existing & New  Source  Complement State Measures Plan Existing EGUs  or  Existing & New MODEL  RULE
  34. 34. Mass Allowance Allocations • The plans create allowances equal to a state’s mass  goal • EPA wants states to determine the allowance  distributions • If EPA is distributing allowances, they propose to do  this based on historical 2010‐2012 generation data  • EPA is taking comment on other distribution options.
  35. 35. Allocation Set‐asides EPA is proposing three set‐asides for the  federal plan and model rule 1. Clean Energy Incentive Program 2. Output‐based allocation to existing  natural gas set‐aside to address leakage  3. RE set‐aside of 5% to address leakage
  36. 36. Key Points in Mass‐Based Model Rule • Existing Sources Only, Uses Allowance Allocation  to Address Leakage • Trading Ready • EPA will track allowances using the Allowance  Tracking and Compliance System (ATCS)* • Allowances can be banked with no restrictions*
  37. 37. PROPOSED MODEL RULES: RATE‐BASED MODEL RULE
  38. 38. Pathways Rate Define Eligible  ERCs Sub‐categorized  Rate State‐wide  (blend) Rate State Defined  Rates MODEL  RULE Can be  multistate
  39. 39. Emission Rate Credits (ERCs) There are three categories that can generate ERCs: 1. Affected EGUs operating below subcategory  emission performance rate 2. Existing NGCC earns Gas Shift ERCs (GS‐ERCs) to  sell to fossil steam units (cannot use for NGCC  compliance) 3. Zero emitting resources: Post 2012 renewable  energy, energy efficiency, nuclear generating or  avoiding MWh during compliance period
  40. 40. Zero‐Emitting ERCs  Model Rule proposal • All wind • All solar (including distributed) • Geothermal • Hydropower • Qualified biomass • Wave • Tidal • Waste‐to‐energy • New/uprate nuclear • Non‐affected combined heat and  power • Demand‐side energy efficiency/  demand‐side management Federal Plan proposal* • On‐shore utility scale wind • Utility scale solar PV • Concentrated solar • Geothermal power • New/uprate nuclear • Utility scale hydro 
  41. 41. ERC Issuance Process 42 Step 1: Project  developer submits  application to state   with EM&V plan and  third party verification State Approves Project  Qualifying energy is  generated or saved and  M&V is carried out with  third party verification Developer submits total  generation and M&V  report to state.  Step 2: State awards  ERCs for verified MWhs and issues ERCs into  the ERC tracking  system
  42. 42. Key Points in Rate‐Based Model Rule • Uses subcategorized rates • Trading ready • Uses EPA tracking system • ERCs can be banked without limit • Includes Clean Energy Incentive Program*
  43. 43. KEY CHOICES FOR STATES
  44. 44. Emissions Standards or State Measures Plan? • Emissions Standards: Compliance obligation  entirely on affected units. • State Measures: All or part of compliance  obligation on state or other entities.  – Accommodates existing programs in California and to  a lesser extent RGGI – For states without existing programs, essentially  requires creation of two plans (state measures plus  backstop)
  45. 45. Mass or Rate? Mass • Administratively simpler • Allowance supply is pre‐ determined; allocation is a  state decision. • Potentially easier to build  upon for future policies • Environmental outcomes  depend on leakage Rate • ERC administration  potentially significant lift,  especially for efficiency • ERC supply is uncertain • Allocates financial incentive  to ERC developer • More or less stringent than  mass?
  46. 46. 47 Existing Sources Only Existing Unit New Unit Existing Plus New Must hold  allowances No requirement to  hold allowances Must hold  allowances Must hold  allowances Mass‐Based  Plans: Addressing the Risk of Leakage
  47. 47. Mass‐Based Plans and Leakage 3 options available to states 1. Cover new sources 2. Use an allocation method that counteracts  leakage (presumptively approvable model rule  method)  3. Other methods demonstrated by state to prevent  leakage
  48. 48. New Source Complements  Cumulative National Increase  in Interim Goal  Budget National Increase in Final  Goal Budget 1.8% 2.5% 49 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Million Tons Final Goal New Source Complement Final Mass‐Based Goals Plus  New Source Complements by State
  49. 49. Mass‐Based Plans and Leakage Cover New Sources • Covering new sources does  not limit load growth.  • Does limit emissions. • May make it harder or  easier to comply depending  on assumptions about  future demand and  emissions Existing Sources Only • No limit on new NGCC • Must adequately address   the risk of leakage through  allowance allocation or  other mechanism(s) • No forward going  requirement to show  leakage did not occur  50
  50. 50. Allowance Distribution  in Mass‐Based Plans States have discretion to distribute allowances, so long  as leakage is adequately addressed.  Some possible goals for allowance distribution: • Protect or benefit ratepayers/consumers • Fairly distribute regulatory obligation • Encourage specific outcomes or activities (e.g.  encouraging certain plants to run or investments in  energy efficiency, renewable energy)
  51. 51. Mass: Alternative Ways to Distribute Allowances Common Options Rationale Examples ALLOCATE FOR FREE * “Grandfathering”: Given to all  emitters based on historic emissions (or generation) Political buy‐in for owners of  initial emitting assets Early yrs of EU ETS Other pollutant ETS (acid rain) Nox (heat input) * Output‐based (updating): Given  free to emitters in proportion to  their ongoing generation levels Mitigate leakage to uncapped  sources NOx trading program California C&T for (trade‐explosed)  industrial sectors  * Setasides for targeted activities  (e.g., renewables, energy efficiency)  or populations (rate‐payers), price  containment   Way to finance, e.g., low carbon  investment, lessen burden on  rate‐payers Waxman‐Markey bill provisions Cal. Set aside for LSE’s on behalf of  ratepayers CA and RGGI cost containment reserves COMPETITIVE AUCTION Government auction with targeted  proceeds to types of households,  investments,…   Address disproportionate impacts Finance low carbon investment RGGI poor household EE VA NOx Government auction with use of  revenues to reduce taxes Fiscal reform Political buy‐in British Columbia (carbon tax, not ETS) * CPP proposed federal plan has dimensions of these options
  52. 52. Rate: Emission Rate Credits • What types of resources can earn credits? – State discretion other than new sources, offsets, and  energy storage. – What resources actually get built is still a utility  commission decision. • EM&V requirements for each qualifying resource – EPA draft guidance available – Tension between costs and accuracy of estimating  energy savings from energy efficiency measures. 
  53. 53. Scope of Trading? • Proposes to allow federal plan states to trade  with similar approved state plans using EPA  tracking system, taking comment on also  linked systems
  54. 54. Trading Partners?
  55. 55. Thank you! Julie.DeMeester@duke.edu Sarah.Adair@duke.edu Christina.Reichert@duke.edu https://nicholasinstitute.duke.edu/focal‐areas/clean‐air‐act‐ clean‐power‐plan
  56. 56. Rate Based State Plans – (Non‐Exhaustive) Rate Based Model  Rule Rate Based  Federal Plan  Clean Energy  Incentive Program Onshore wind* Utility‐scale solar PV* Concentrating solar  power* Geothermal* Hydropower* Qualified Biomass Energy Efficiency including  water system efficiency  Waste to Energy  DSM  T&D Nuclear Energy CHP  WHP/”bottom cycling CHP  units” Distributed Renewables Wind (all) Solar (all) Geothermal Hydropower Wave Tidal Qualified Biomass Waste‐to‐Energy  Nuclear Energy Non‐affected CHP Demand Side  EE/DSM On‐shore utility  scale wind Utility scale solar PV Concentrated solar  power Geothermal power Nuclear Energy Utility scale  hydropower Any type of wind*  Any type of solar Energy Efficiency in  Low Income  Communities *Under the  proposed model  rule, in federal plan  states eligible wind  is limited to on‐ shore. *Part of the BSER (utility scale only) Sources: Section VII K &V E  Source: § 62.16435  Source: § 62.16435  Source: § 62.16235
  57. 57. Biomass in the Clean Power Plan Mass Based Plan • EPA seeking comment on  inclusion of biomass as an  eligible measure in the  Proposed Federal Plan • Proposed Model Rule  includes “qualified biomass” – Must justify qualified biomass – Must include methods for  emission measurements and  feedstock verification Rate Based Plan • EPA seeking comment on  Emission Rate Credit (ERC)  eligibility for biomass in  Proposed Federal Plan • Qualified biomass eligible for  ERCs in Model Rule ‐ Must justify qualified biomass ‐ Must include methods for  emission measurements and  feedstock verification
  58. 58. Requirements for Biomass  in State Plans  To include biogenic feedstocks in plans*, states must: • Address types of biogenic feedstocks used • Justify why proposed feedstocks can be determined qualified  biomass • Address valuation of biogenic CO2 emissions • Explain evaluation and monitoring systems to properly  account for biogenic CO2 emissions  • Include third party verification of qualified biomass * The SAB Panel process and updated 2014 Framework is  expected to inform how states should best address these  requirements in their plans.
  59. 59. States Alabama Arizona Corporation Commission Arkansas Colorado Florida Georgia Indiana Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Louisiana Dep’t of Environmental Quality Michigan Attorney General Mississippi Mississippi Dep’t of Environmental Quality Missouri Montana Nebraska New Jersey North Carolina Dep’t of Environmental Quality North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Attorney Generall Oklahoma Dep’t of Environmental Quality South Carolina South Dakota Texas Utah West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Utilities Industry Co‐Ops Alabama Power Company American Chemistry Council American Coalition for Clean Coal  Electricity American Coke & Coal Chemicals Institute American Foundry Society American Forest & Paper Ass’n American Fuel & Petrochemical  Manufacturers American Iron & Steel Institute American Public Power Association American Wood Council Arizona Electric Power Coop, Inc.  Association of American Railroads Associated Electric Coop, Inc. Basin Electric Power Cooperative Big Brown Power Company LLC Big Brown Lignite Company LLC Big Rivers Electric Corporation Brazos Electric Power Coop, Inc. Brick Industry Association Buckeye Power, Inc. Central Montana Electric Power Coop Central Power Electric Coop, Inc. Chamber of Commerce CO2 Task Force of the Florida Electric  Power Coordinating Group, Inc. Corn Belt Power Cooperative Dairyland Power Cooperative Deseret Generation & Transmission Coop Dixon Brothers Inc. East Kentucky Power Cooperative, Inc. East River Electric Power Coop, Inc. East Texas Electric Cooperative, Inc. Electricity Consumers Resource Council Georgia Power Company Georgia Transmission Corporation Golden Spread Electrical Cooperative, Inc. Gulf Coast Lignite Coalition Gulf Power Company Hoosier Energy Rural Electric Coop, Inc. International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Iron  Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers, & Helpers Joy Global Inc. Kansas Electric Power Cooperative, Inc. Lignite Energy Council Luminant Big Brown Mining Company LLC Luminant Generation Company LLC Luminant Mining Company LLC Minnkota Power Cooperative, Inc. Mississippi Power Company Montana‐Dakota Utilities Co. Murray Energy Corporation National Association of Home Builders National Association of Manufacturers National Federation of Independent Business National Lime Association National Mining Association National Oilseed Processors Association National Rural Electric Cooperative Ass’n Nelson Bros. Inc. Norfolk Southern Corp. North Carolina Electric Membership Co. Northeast Texas Electric Cooperative, Inc. Northwest Iowa Power Cooperative NorthWestern Corporation Oak Grove Management Company LLC Oglethorpe Power Corporation Peabody Energy Corp. Portland Cement Association PowerSouth Energy Cooperative Prairie Power, Inc. Rushmore Electric Power Coop, Inc. Sam Rayburn G&T Electric Coop, Inc. San Miguel Electric Cooperative, Inc. Seminole Electric Cooperative, Inc. Sandow Power Company LLC South Mississippi Electric Power Ass’n South Texas Electric Cooperative, Inc. Southern Illinois Power Cooperative Sunflower Electric Power Corporation Tex‐La Electric Cooperative of Texas, Inc. Tri‐State Generation & Transmission Association United Mine Workers of America Upper Missouri G. & T. Electric Cooperative, Inc. Utility Air Regulatory Group Wabash Valley Power Association, Inc. Wesco International Inc. Westar Energy, Inc. Western Farmers Electric Cooperative West Virginia Coal Association Wolverine Power Supply Coop, Inc. Challengers in the CPP Lawsuit
  60. 60. Supporters in the CPP Lawsuit States California Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Hawaii Illinois Iowa Maine Maryland Massachusetts Minnesota New Hampshire New Mexico New York Oregon Rhode Island Vermont Virginia Washington Cities and  Counties Austin, Texas Boulder, Colorado Broward County, Florida Chicago, Illinois New York, New York Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Seattle, Washington South Miami, Florida Nonprofits Advanced Energy Economy American Lung Association American Wind Energy Association Center for Biological Diversity Clean Air Council Clean Wisconsin Conservation Law Foundation Environmental Defense Fund Natural Resources Defense Council Ohio Environmental Council Sierra Club Utilities Industry Co‐Ops Austin Energy Calpine Corporation National Grid Generation, LLC NextEra Energy Inc. Pacific Gas and Electric Company Seattle City Light Department
  61. 61. Nicholas Institute Modeling of the Clean Power Plan Integral part of work with state decision makers Goal: provide information to guide threshold level decisions rate vs. mass, include new sources, trading‐ready partners Iterative process 62 Modeling scenarios Mass covering existing units Subcategorized rate‐based Mass covering existing + new Blended rate‐based Different trading‐ready configurations Sensitivities: NG price, RE costs, EE
  62. 62. Output‐based Allocation Set‐Aside • This set‐aside is intended to address leakage by  encouraging existing NGCC • EPA has proposed the size of the set‐aside for each  state  State Interim 2 Goal 2025‐2027 Allowances in output‐ based set‐aside Set‐aside as a percent  of allowances Alabama 60,918,973 4,185,496 6.87% Arkansas 32,953,521 2,102,538 6.38% Florida 110,754,683 12,102,688 10.93% Georgia 49,855,082 3,563,104 7.15% Kentucky 69,698,851 288,730 0.41% Louisiana 38,461,163 2,207,879 5.74% Mississippi 26,790,683 3,132,671 11.69% North Carolina 55,749,239 2,120,178 3.80% South Carolina 28,336,836 1,029,366 3.63% Tennessee 31,079,178 632,949 2.04% Virginia 28,990,999 3,011,811 10.39% West Virginia 56,762,771 0 0.00% Proposed set‐aside for output‐based allocation for the second compliance period (short tons)
  63. 63. Output‐based Allocation Set‐Aside to  Address Leakage There is a lagged accounting method • NGCC units earn output‐based allowances in one compliance period  (for example 2022‐2024) by operating above 50% CF over entire  period • Submits the confirmed generation to state (EPA)  • State (EPA) awards the allowances in the next compliance period • If exceed allocation, distribute pro‐rata basis • Unused allowances distributed to affected EGUs Allowance   to existing  NGCC unit = Net  Generation  over 50% CF * 1030 lbs/MWh‐net 64
  64. 64. RE Set‐Aside to Address Leakage • 5% allowances in model rule • In‐state: utility‐scale wind, solar (any), geothermal and  utility‐scale hydro constructed after Jan 1, 2013  • Sources apply to EPA/state with MWh projection • Allocation year prior to generation • True‐up mechanism • All allowances allocated, allowances per MWh  depends on total – cannot simultaneously generate ERCs • Set‐aside increases with retirements in model rule 65
  65. 65. RE Set‐aside • The distribution of the allowances happens at the  beginning of each year (before the RE has been  generated) as follows: – The EPA approves the eligibility of a RE project, which projects its  generation and includes EM&V – The EPA distributes allowances to eligible projects on a pro‐rata basis – At the end of the generation year, the RE project must true‐up with its  projected generation • EPA expects this set‐aside to grow, as they propose the  allowances from retired EGUs get added to the RE set‐ aside
  66. 66. CEIP set‐aside • For early‐action EE and RE in 2020 and  2021 • The state‐match allowances are pulled  from the first interim compliance  period only • For any state that takes over the  allowance distributions of a federal  plan, they still need a CEIP set‐aside,  but they can change the amount of  allowances • A state with a model rule can opt out  of the CEIP State Set‐aside 2022 through 2024 Alabama 3,122,306 Arkansas 2,187,230 Florida 3,230,248 Georgia 2,755,623 Kentucky 4,952,862 Louisiana 1,497,428 Mississippi 357,307 North Carolina 2,674,590 South Carolina 1,652,802 Tennessee 2,178,084 Virginia 1,386,546 West Virginia 3,506,890 Proposed CEIP Early Action Allowance Set‐Aside in  the Mass‐Based Federal Plan (Short Tons)
  67. 67. Example of all Mass Set‐Asides a RE set‐aside proposed to grow as EGUs retire Example of allowance set‐asides for South Carolina – varies by state Mass Goal CEIP set- aside Output-based allocation RE set- asidea Set-asides as a percentage of the mass budget Interim Phase 1 31,025,518 1,652,802 0 1,551,276 10.33% Interim Phase 2 28,336,836 0 1,029,366 1,416,842 8.63% Interim Phase 3 26,834,962 0 1,029,366 1,341,748 8.84% Final 25,998,968 0 1,029,366 1,299,948 8.96%
  68. 68. Affected EGU ERCs Accounting Example Example 1: An NGCC facility with an average emissions rate of 700 that generates  1,000 MWh in a final compliance period with the final NGCC  compliance standard of 771: ERCs = (771 ‐700)/771 * 1000  = 92.1 or 92 ERCs earned Example 2: An NGCC facility with average emissions rate of 800 that generates  1,000 MWh in a final compliance period with the final NGCC  compliance standard of 771: ERCs = (771‐800)/771 * 1000 = (‐29/771) *1000 = ‐37.6 or 38 ERCs owed ERCs = (EGU standard – EGU operating rate)/EGU standard * generation 
  69. 69. Gas‐Shift ERCs • GS‐ERCs can be created by all existing NGCC • GS‐ERCs are independent of the NGCC standard and  can be used for steam generation compliance only • The same NGCC facility might be creating GS‐ERCs  and still need to surrender ERCs to meet their rate  target GS‐ERC = NGCC  Generation * Incremental  Generation  Factor GS‐ERC  Emission  Factor *
  70. 70. Gas Shift‐ERC Equation* *in federal plan proposal The GS‐ERC Emission Factor represents how much  lower an individual NGCC’s emission rate is compared  against the fossil steam standard GS‐ERC  Emission  Factor = 1 GS‐ERC = NGCC  Generation * Incremental  Generation  Factor GS‐ERC  Emission  Factor * 71
  71. 71. Clean Energy Incentive Program What ERCs to retire? • ERCs must be created • Pull ERCs from CEIP recipient?  2020 2021 2022 20223 2024 2025… Gen (MWh)  262,800 262,800 262,800 262,800 262,800 262,800 EPA ERCs 131,400 131,400 State ERCs 131,400 131,400 131,400 131,400 262,800 262,800 Illustrative example 100 MW wind farm with a 30% capacity factor
  72. 72. Clean Energy Incentive Program EPA providing credits/allowances from 300 million ton pool State provides matching credits/allowances • EPA matching credits/allowances are additional • State credits/allowances cannot add to supply in compliance periods Where do state matching allowances/credits come from?  Mass based model rule: from allowance set‐aside in 1st interim compliance  period  pulling from future • Change in allocation, supply of allowances unchanged Rate based: EPA requires states to do something analogous • Suggests retiring future ERCs or adjusting the rate targets 73
  73. 73. Trading Options in State Plan Pathways Multi‐State Plan  with Defined Trading  Partners and  Multi‐State Goal Intra‐state Trading  Only “Trading Ready”  Plan with Single  State Goal • Only trading  option for state‐ defined rates • Allowable in all  plan types • Required for  interstate trading  with blended rate • Allowable in all  plan types except  state‐defined  rates • New relative to  proposed rule • Allowed for all  types of mass  based plans and  subcategorized‐ rates  All Plan Types Certain Plan Types
  74. 74. Why Trade? 1. Electrons do not stop at state borders • Flexibility to manage grid 2. Cost • Wider markets tend to lower overall cost 3. Growth • Access to markets for additional allowances  4. Reliability • Potential benefits of geographic diversity
  75. 75. 0 500 1000 1500 2000 WV KY TN SC NC AR LA GA AL MS VA FL Carbon EmissionsRate (lbs/MWh) Proposed Goal Final Goal Decreased Variability Between States  (Southeast states blended rate comparison) • The final rate goals are much less variable across the country compared to the  proposal • 31 states have less stringent targets (16 have more stringent targets) compared to  the proposal Source: EPA Data File Goal Computation Appendix 1‐5. Fossil  Steam  Final  Rate NGCC  Final  Rate
  76. 76. Source:  https://www3.epa.gov/climatechange /ghgemissions/sources.html
  77. 77. EPA’s MAPPING OF THE STATE PLAN APPROACH OPTIONS

×