TheAggies

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TheAggies

  1. 1. The Aggressive Aggies!!! • AMIR MALIK • MOHIT DOGRA • SOMESH KATIYAR • RAVI KUMAR • SANDEEP SINGH CHANDIGARH GROUP OF COLLEGE
  2. 2. India’s Energy Source Production
  3. 3. A Recommended PlateA Typical Indian Plate We consume more agriculture product than other food groups
  4. 4. OUR PRODUCTIVITY IS NOT OPTIMAL
  5. 5. Boosting of FARMERS’ MORALE
  6. 6. Development of Indian Agriculture : Basic Issues  Revitalization of Cooperative Institutions  Improving Rural Credits  Research, Education & Extension  Human Resources Development  Trade & Export Promotion  Land Reforms  Enabling Environment for higher Agricultural Growth
  7. 7. Better INBRED & HYBRID Seeds  Inbreds for the different environments  Hybrids that also perform well during wet season; can yield up to 12 t/ha a minimum yield increase of 1mt/ha using hybrid rice in the 800,000 ha irrigated rice areas in the country can result in an additional rice production of 1.6 mt of palay (960,000 mt milled rice; usual importation is 600,000 mt)
  8. 8. Better Crop Mgt  Efficient use of fertilizer (& water)  Use of farm machines  Use of PalayCheck system
  9. 9. The Global Food and Agriculture System The 21st Century Challenges:  Feed a growing, more prosperous world – and hopefully better than we have in the past  Increase food output 50% by 2025  More than double by 2050  Contribute to national energy security in many countries  Preserve/enhance the environment  Maintain the rural cultural heritage With these constraints:  While using the same or fewer resources  And, do this against t he backdrop of global climate change!
  10. 10. Global population growth 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2025 FC 2050 FC Source: United Nations, 2006 Billions 8.0 9.2
  11. 11. India’s position in world Agriculture Rank  Total Area Seventh  Irrigated Area First  Population Second  Economically Active population Second  Total Cereals Third  Wheat Second  Rice Second  Coarse grains Fourth  Total Pulses First  Oil Seeds Second  Fruits and Vegetables Second  Implements (Tractors) Third  Milk First  Live Stock (castles, Buffaloes) First
  12. 12. 4% 56% 8% 32% -1% Distribution by region Population growth by 2025
  13. 13. 50% 40% 4% 8% -2% Distribution by region Population growth by 2050
  14. 14. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008F 2009F World GDP growth Annual%Change Unprecedented global prosperity
  15. 15. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008F 2009F World Developing Developed World GDP growth Annual%Change Growth most rapid in developing countries
  16. 16. 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008F 2009F Policy reforms of early 1990’s now yielding results GDPgrowth Annual%Change India’s growth continues
  17. 17. Renewable fuel  Many national governments are adding a new task for the agriculture system: help increase energy security  Driven by varied objectives:  Reduced foreign energy dependence  Environmental enhancement  Rural development – farm support  Directed by public policy (subsidies, mandates, R&D investment, tariffs)
  18. 18. The environmental challenge  Protect the natural resource base  Prevent degradation of the land  Improve air quality  Develop more efficient water use, improve quality  Improve wildlife habitat  Avoid biodiversity loss  Cultural protection aspect (viewscapes, farm structure, practices)  Post-Industrial Challenge: increase productivity - reduce intrusion
  19. 19. Growing resource constraints  Much of world’s total arable area already in use – the most fertile requiring least investment  Most remaining land has serious soil and terrain constraints  Some covered in forests, in protected areas  Characteristics difficult for agriculture – low soil fertility, high toxicity, hilly and other difficult terrain – human and animal disease, poor infrastructure  Most located in Africa and Latin America (70% suffers soil and terrain constraints)  Further expansion is controversial – could jeopardize fragile lands  Will require considerable capital investment Source: FAO Produce more with less… Land | Water | Labor
  20. 20. Growing resource constraints 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 B razil R ussia India C hina Indonesia U SA M exico uth A frica im babw e HectareofArableLand Arable Land (ha) per person Most populous countries have least room to expand Produce more with less… Land | Water | Labor
  21. 21. Growing resource constraints  70% of world’s freshwater is used by agriculture  90% in India and China  30 developing countries already facing growing water shortages  Water and population unevenly distributed – by 2025:  1.8 bil. people will live in areas with absolute water scarcity  2/3rds of world population will live in ‘water-stressed’ areas  Rainfed agriculture practiced on 80% of cultivated land – accounts for 60% of world’s food  Irrigation can increase yields of most crops two-to-four fold  New irrigation technologies can reduce water use 30% to 60% over surface irrigationSource: UN-Water and FAO Produce more with less… Land | Water | Labor
  22. 22. Water use and soil management  According to FAO estimates, as much as 40 per cent of the world’s food is grown using irrigation, but large amounts of this water is lost to leakage in the irrigation system itself. Improper irrigation is also a major cause of soil salinity. Roughly one tenth of the world’s irrigated land has been damaged by salt. With the threat of climate changes, more and more regions of the world are also at risk of drought and desertification. Improved irrigation practices will help conserve water and protect vulnerable land.
  23. 23. WE ARE WASTING AWAY TOO MUCH
  24. 24. Final comments  Longer term business backdrop likely to be much different  Pace of global economic growth is key  Growing global emphasis on agriculture/infrastructure  System struggling for awhile – market volatility  Productivity growth (technology) critical  Presents opportunities  Growing globalization (despite current sentiments)  Production facilities location  Customer base expanding  Product trade (food, fuel, forestry) expanding  Technology dissemination emphasis  Growing importance of policy drivers  Premium on greater agility/flexibility  Plus hangover effect of past bad policies (energy, food)
  25. 25. Control of Insect Pests  Insect pests are another serious threat to productivity. They can devastate crop yields and transmit disease to both crops and livestock. Conservative estimates put losses of food production in the range of 25–35 per cent, even with use of pesticides. Moreover, there are concerns that reliance on pesticides to maintain yields not only has neg- ative impacts on the environment, but may also lead to the insects developing resistance to the pesticides themselves. Through its Insect and Pest Control programme, the Agency is using nuclear science to develop environmentally friendly alternatives for pest control. One of the most successful techniques developed to date is the sterile insect technique (SIT).
  26. 26. Messages: RESPONSIBLE CONSUMPTION • Consume just the right amount for better health • Try alternative food staples for better health • Eat better for better health • Reduce food wastage for rice self-sufficiency
  27. 27. OUTPUT/IMPACT  United country in achieving rice self-sufficiency  Confident/proud farmers and higher regard for Filipino farmers  Increased productivity of farmers who lack access to information on latest rice technologies  Healthier rice consumers  Reduced rice wastage  Reduced amount of imported rice or ultimately… PRODUCTION SELFSUFFICIENCY!
  28. 28. THANKS • Amir Malik • Mohit dogra • SOMESH KATIYAR • RAVI KUMAR • SANDEEP SINGH CHANDIGARH GROUP OF COLLEGE

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