Before to start …
Prague, Czech Republic 24.-25.6.2013
8th international conference DisCo 2013: New
technologies and media literacy educatio...
Where I live
and work
EDUCATION in Trentino: statistical data
Pupils: 83.523
nursery school: 17.094
lower (: first) school: 26.363
middle school...
EDUCATION in Trentino: statistical data
Schools in the province
nursery school: 287
lower (: first) school: 240
middle sch...
The AUTONOMY
of the Province of Trento
Italy's Constitution and a special statute from the
year 1972 (together with follow...
Technology use in education in Trentino
RADIO TV INTERNET
MUSIC
INSTRUCTIONAL
STUFF
Interactive Whiteboards in Trentino
Interactive Whiteboard in Trentino: who use it in classroom
Interactive Whiteboard in Trentino: for what
Why this presentation?
This paper aims to discuss why and how teaching
practices and technologies need to be integrated,
a...
1. Introduction
The presence of technology in learning
environments (school, university, professional
training, etc.) does...
Assessing technologies’ effects
M. Fullan
A. Calvani
J.C. Hattie
Learners’
role
Technologies
Methodologie
Measured
effects
2. Pedagogical vs technological innovation?
Following the European project Creative
Classroom (Bocconi, Kampylis and Punie...
2. Pedagogical vs technological innovation?
Fullan (2011) argues that, although in some
countries laptops and video projec...
How people learn?
How People Learn (Donovan, Bransford, 2005)
approach, recently referred to in the project
Digital Learni...
How people learn?
How People Learn (Donovan, Bransford, 2005)
approach, recently referred to in the project
Digital Learni...
3. The IWB example …
3. The IWB example …
IWBs can be an important resource for involving
pupils during lessons. However, problems of a
varying...
4. Technologies, computers and learning
Hattie (2009), when revising the meta-analyses
regarding different types of techno...
4. Technologies, computers and learning
Technology works
a. As part of teaching
strategies
b. When there is a prior
traini...
Source: Hattie, J.A.C. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses
relating to achievement. New York, ...
4. Technologies, computers and learning
With particular conditions of use, technologies
can influence the teaching/learnin...
5. A Possible way of integration: the creative
classroom framework
Insights are from a European research project, carried
...
Creative Class Rooms extended framework (Bocconi et al., 2012).
5. A Possible way of integration: the creative
classroom framework
Main project results highlight the multi-dimensional
an...
5. A Possible way of integration: the creative
Learning Solution Approach
5. What kind of innovation with LSA?
Incremental innovation
Integration
between old and
new technologies
Flexible use of
s...
5. LSA vs CCR
6. Conclusions
In the history of technology there is a reoccurring
tendency to focus one’s attention on the technical
inno...
6. Conclusions
I believe that innovative project based on LSA might
get the level of educational innovation, both at local...
Back to Scientific American:
For 3,4 millions of years no evident
signs of innovation in human
beings’ behavior.
In Europe...
Francesco Pisanu
francesco.pisanu@iprase.tn.it
Website: www.iprase.tn.it
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DisCo 2013: Keynote presentation - Francesco Pisanu: Educational innovation and technology: a need for integration

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Francesco Pisanu is a research fellow in educational research at IPRASE (Provincial Institute of Educational Research and Experimentation ), in the Province of Trento, Italy. He studies, among other topics, psychosocial aspect related to the use of technology in education and training, special educational needs and inclusion, innovation in teaching practices and organizational issues in educational context. He has always been interested in research methodology, mostly in computer mediated environments. He has studied (work and organizational) Psychology and he got a Ph.D. in Information Systems and Organization at the University of Trento. He taught Social Psychology of groups and he is currently teaching Educational and Guidance Psychology at the Faculty of Cognitive Sciences, University of Trento.

Abstract of presentation: Educational innovation and technology: a need for integration

The presence of technology in learning environments (school, university, vocational education and training, professional development, etc.) does not necessarily entail a direct change in pedagogical vision or teaching practices. The mere placing of computers, video projectors and IWBs in classrooms does not mark the ultimate attainment of a teaching innovation. For this reason, I believe it is important to discuss the concept of technology-based pedagogical innovation, connect this concept to a learning theory, clarify the role of technology as far as teachers and learning results are concerned and, thus, reflect on the different levels of analyses in the study of the relationship between technologies and development of competences, digital competences included.

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DisCo 2013: Keynote presentation - Francesco Pisanu: Educational innovation and technology: a need for integration

  1. 1. Before to start …
  2. 2. Prague, Czech Republic 24.-25.6.2013 8th international conference DisCo 2013: New technologies and media literacy education Educational innovation and technology: a need for integration Francesco Pisanu IPRASE & Trento University, Department of Psychology and Cognitive Sciences Maurizio Gentile IPRASE & LUMSA Rome
  3. 3. Where I live and work
  4. 4. EDUCATION in Trentino: statistical data Pupils: 83.523 nursery school: 17.094 lower (: first) school: 26.363 middle school: 15.492 upper school: 20.458 vocational school: 4.116 Teachers: 8.300 ~ Students Univ. of Trento: 15.530 F 7.933 / M 7.597; 8.553 from the province, 323 from foreign countries, 6654 from other Italian regions.
  5. 5. EDUCATION in Trentino: statistical data Schools in the province nursery school: 287 lower (: first) school: 240 middle school: 84 upper school: 34 Vocational schools: Upper Secondary schools Public: 24 (TVET: 16) Private: 10 (TVET: 3) VET centres Public: 2 Private: 20
  6. 6. The AUTONOMY of the Province of Trento Italy's Constitution and a special statute from the year 1972 (together with following supplements and amendments) awards the province Trento a particular autonomy (with legislative and administrative powers)
  7. 7. Technology use in education in Trentino RADIO TV INTERNET MUSIC INSTRUCTIONAL STUFF
  8. 8. Interactive Whiteboards in Trentino
  9. 9. Interactive Whiteboard in Trentino: who use it in classroom Interactive Whiteboard in Trentino: for what
  10. 10. Why this presentation? This paper aims to discuss why and how teaching practices and technologies need to be integrated, at all levels, to improve learners meaningful learning. A first attempt to define pedagogical innovation is presented, with a reference to Creative Class Room framework (CCR). From this point of view, pedagogical innovation, considering technological and digital based learning environment, is a matter of integration among different levels of analysis.
  11. 11. 1. Introduction The presence of technology in learning environments (school, university, professional training, etc.) does not necessarily entail a direct change in pedagogical vision or teaching practices. It is important: to discuss the concept of technology-based pedagogical innovation, connect this concept to a learning theory, clarify the role of technology, reflect on the different levels of analyses involved.
  12. 12. Assessing technologies’ effects M. Fullan A. Calvani J.C. Hattie Learners’ role Technologies Methodologie Measured effects
  13. 13. 2. Pedagogical vs technological innovation? Following the European project Creative Classroom (Bocconi, Kampylis and Punie, 2012), we can define pedagogical innovation as that set of products, processes, strategies and approaches which significantly improve the state of affairs, becoming reference points According to the Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (OECD/CERI, 2009), promoting innovation in the learning environment is not at all easy and requires great commitment, the ability to manage multiple resistances and it frequently translates into slow rates of change.
  14. 14. 2. Pedagogical vs technological innovation? Fullan (2011) argues that, although in some countries laptops and video projectors are replacing traditional technologies, the majority of students continue to experience their role as «consumers of information» rather than problem resolvers, producers of information and innovators. Innovating learning processes is opposed to the use of technologies to replicate traditional teaching practices. It can be extended to formal and informal learning environments, training adults, at school and at university (CCR, 2012).
  15. 15. How people learn? How People Learn (Donovan, Bransford, 2005) approach, recently referred to in the project Digital Learning Classroom (Lopez, 2010). The approach puts forward five general principles: 1. learners learn better when knowledge merges with and/or develops from what they already know; 2. learners learn better when they work with others in learning, they ask questions and they reflect on what they have learnt and how it was learnt;
  16. 16. How people learn? How People Learn (Donovan, Bransford, 2005) approach, recently referred to in the project Digital Learning Classroom (Lopez, 2010). The approach puts forward five general principles: 3. learners learn better when the information offered and the context are tailored to the cognitive needs of them; 4. learners learn better if what they learn is fundamental and in-depth and if the individual competences/abilities are strongly anchored to a principle/general concept, and if what they have studied has multiple applications; 5. learners learn better when they are given feedback and/or are given the opportunity to evaluate their own learning.
  17. 17. 3. The IWB example …
  18. 18. 3. The IWB example … IWBs can be an important resource for involving pupils during lessons. However, problems of a varying nature do materialize around them: an increase in the centrality of the teacher and a reduction in collaborative interaction amongst students (Latane, 2002; Jones, Tanner, 2002; Maor, 2003); minor quality of cognitive interaction between teachers and pupils (Smith, Hardman and Higgins, 2006). If used as static technology, the IWB does not produce any appreciable changes in teaching practices (Beauchamp, 2004; Glover, Miller, 2009).
  19. 19. 4. Technologies, computers and learning Hattie (2009), when revising the meta-analyses regarding different types of technologies use found effects which varied from 0.09 of standard deviation for distance learning up to a maximum of 0.52 associated with learning methods based on interactive videos. In more specific terms the meta-analyses show that computers are used effectively:
  20. 20. 4. Technologies, computers and learning Technology works a. As part of teaching strategies b. When there is a prior training c. With multiple learning opportunities d. When student controls them e. With peer-learning f. With teacher’s feedback Source: Hattie, J.A.C. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. New York, NY: Routledge.
  21. 21. Source: Hattie, J.A.C. (2009). Visible learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. New York, NY: Routledge. Technology ES Interactive video methods 0,52 Simulations 0,33 Computer-assisted instruction 0,32 Programmed instruction 0,24 Audio-visual methods 0,22 Web-based learning 0,18 Distance education 0,09 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  22. 22. 4. Technologies, computers and learning With particular conditions of use, technologies can influence the teaching/learning process, above all when they are centered on the students. Unfortunately it is just as clear that the impacts of technologies on learning outcomes have provided contrasting results. In our opinion the levels to consider should include the following: school level; technological level; teachers level; Students level.
  23. 23. 5. A Possible way of integration: the creative classroom framework Insights are from a European research project, carried out by EC JRC-IPTS from December 2011 to June 2013, on “Up-scaling Creative Classrooms in Europe” (SCALE CCR). Aim of the study is to provide a better understanding of ICT-enabled innovation for learning and to identify policy recommendations for the further mainstreaming of ICT in Education and Training (E&T) in Europe. In addition to desk research, a number of existing cases have been analyzed which provide insights on major enablers and barriers of CCR implementation in real contexts.
  24. 24. Creative Class Rooms extended framework (Bocconi et al., 2012).
  25. 25. 5. A Possible way of integration: the creative classroom framework Main project results highlight the multi-dimensional and holistic nature of the Creative Classrooms as innovative learning environments that fully embed the potentials of ICT for learning. The model consists of eight encompassing and interconnected dimensions that capture the essential nature of these learning ecosystems: Content and Curricula, Assessment, Learning Practices, Teaching Practices, Organization, Leadership and Values, Connectedness, and Infrastructure.
  26. 26. 5. A Possible way of integration: the creative Learning Solution Approach
  27. 27. 5. What kind of innovation with LSA? Incremental innovation Integration between old and new technologies Flexible use of space and learning environment Adapting activities to available softwares Basic cooperative learning structures
  28. 28. 5. LSA vs CCR
  29. 29. 6. Conclusions In the history of technology there is a reoccurring tendency to focus one’s attention on the technical innovations of the new tools, to the detriment of pedagogical reflection and evaluation of sustainability. it is difficult to offer teachers guidance on how to use them without a clear understanding of how pupils learn (Howland et. al., 2012). The LSA approach could be an attempt to support a integrated pedagogical ICT-based innovation starting from and incremental, rather than radical innovation point of view (Cooper, 1998).
  30. 30. 6. Conclusions I believe that innovative project based on LSA might get the level of educational innovation, both at local and national level if it will help to develop a key focus on the following points. First, design and implementation of classroom-based solutions, which help teachers to integrate technology in subject-matter teaching and learning. Second, encourage a open use of hardware and software devices; provide pupils with lots of opportunities for learning. Last but not the least, ensure a consistent support to teachers during the instructional work.
  31. 31. Back to Scientific American: For 3,4 millions of years no evident signs of innovation in human beings’ behavior. In Europe, innovation turning point 40,000 years ago. Creativity and innovation are not only “brain-size” related but also social group size and group connectiveness related. The cultural “ratchet effect” applied on creativity and innovation.
  32. 32. Francesco Pisanu francesco.pisanu@iprase.tn.it Website: www.iprase.tn.it

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