Pitch Letters Media Advisories Media Kits And Opeds

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This slideshow focuses on the development of pitch letters, media advisories and media kits by public relations professionals.

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Pitch Letters Media Advisories Media Kits And Opeds

  1. 1. Pitch Letters, Advisories, Media Kits and Op-Eds Chapter 8 PR 313
  2. 2. Pitch Letters <ul><li>The odds are against you when you pitch a journalist </li></ul><ul><li>Most pitches do not even receive a response </li></ul><ul><li>You need to improve your odds! </li></ul>
  3. 3. Three phases of a typical pitch <ul><li>1. Research your target media </li></ul><ul><li>2. Write the letter/make the call </li></ul><ul><li>3. Follow up </li></ul>
  4. 4. Research First <ul><li>Before you make contact, learn about the media outlet </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Circulation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Target age of readership/viewership </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Specific editorial leanings/likes/dislikes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reputation of the writer/editor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Any detail that will help you customize your pitch </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Customization <ul><li>Use the information you find to customize the pitch </li></ul><ul><li>A customized pitch has a better chance of success </li></ul><ul><li>Find out how an individual writer/editor prefers to receive their pitches </li></ul>
  6. 6. Preparing the Pitch Letter <ul><li>“ 60-second rule” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>You have a very brief amount of time to make your impact </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Keep it short and simple </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Keep the pitch to a single page </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have a good lead, but make sure that you get to the point quickly </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Six Elements of the Pitch Letter <ul><li>1. Enough facts to support the story </li></ul><ul><li>2. Angle of interest to the audience </li></ul><ul><li>3. Alternative angles suggested </li></ul><ul><li>4. Offer to help with research, interview arrangements and graphics </li></ul><ul><li>5. Indication of authority and/or credibility </li></ul><ul><li>6. Mention of pending follow-up call </li></ul>
  8. 8. Tips <ul><li>Be aware of the deadline that the reporter is operating under </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t call on their deadline! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Only do so if it is big “breaking news” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Don’t call to ask, “Did you get the release?” </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t lie </li></ul>
  9. 9. E-mail Pitches <ul><li>Header should be to the point </li></ul><ul><li>Keep it brief </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t include attachments (unless requested) </li></ul><ul><li>If you are “blasting” an e-mail to multiple editors, you should hide the other recipients </li></ul><ul><li>Add an “opt out” disclaimer at the end of the e-mail </li></ul>
  10. 10. Follow-up <ul><li>“ I will contact you next week to follow-up, but in the meantime you can reach me at…” </li></ul><ul><li>Be prepared to answer detail questions that might help “sell” the story </li></ul><ul><li>Accept “no” graciously </li></ul><ul><ul><li>You are it for the long term – so don’t burn a bridge! </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Media Alerts <ul><li>Used to tell assignment editors about an upcoming event </li></ul><ul><li>There are a few different standard formats </li></ul>
  12. 12. Media Alerts <ul><li>Usually contain short, bulleted items with the basic elements of who, what, when and where </li></ul><ul><li>May include info on where a reporter can get more information, if they are unable to attend in person </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Satellite feed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Online press room </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. “ Interview Opportunity” Media Alert <ul><li>If you are making a spokesperson available for media interviews, a media alert can be used to let reporters know about the opportunity </li></ul>
  14. 14. Media Kits <ul><li>May be elaborate or simple </li></ul><ul><li>Contains various elements on your campaign for the media </li></ul>
  15. 15. Elements of a Media Kit <ul><li>News release </li></ul><ul><li>News feature </li></ul><ul><li>Fact sheet </li></ul><ul><li>Background information </li></ul><ul><li>Photos/Graphics </li></ul><ul><li>Biographical info on the spokesperson or executive </li></ul><ul><li>Basic brochures </li></ul>
  16. 16. Packaging Your Kit <ul><li>A 9 x 12 folder is acceptable </li></ul><ul><li>Some campaigns have more elaborate packaging </li></ul><ul><ul><li>More is not necessarily better </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Your budget may dictate which approach you go with </li></ul>
  17. 17. Electronic Press Kits <ul><li>Mailed press kits are being replaced by electronic press kits </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Accessible on the corporate Web site </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sent via CD-ROM </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. Op-Ed <ul><li>Many campaigns include written articles that are submitted to the opinion/editorial pages of newspapers </li></ul><ul><li>These are usually written by CEOs or high-ranking executives on behalf of the company </li></ul><ul><li>Can be very influential </li></ul><ul><li>No-cost campaign </li></ul>
  19. 19. Op-Ed Pieces <ul><li>Great way to get your message out </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes they will inspire traditional editorial coverage </li></ul><ul><li>Length is typically 400-750 words </li></ul><ul><li>Find out the policy of the paper before you submit your Op-Ed </li></ul>
  20. 20. Writing the Op-Ed <ul><li>Keep it focused to a single theme and idea </li></ul><ul><li>Make your viewpoint clear from the first paragraph </li></ul><ul><li>Use facts and statistics for credibility </li></ul><ul><li>Shorter sentences are preferred </li></ul><ul><li>Write in journalistic third person (no “I”) </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t “mass mail” to multiple media outlets </li></ul>
  21. 21. Letters to the Editor <ul><li>Shorter than op-ed pieces </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on rebutting an editorial or clarifying info in a recent news story </li></ul><ul><li>Used to get your organization’s point of view across with minimal editing </li></ul><ul><li>Find out the paper’s policy/guidelines before submission </li></ul>
  22. 22. Tips <ul><li>Keep it short </li></ul><ul><ul><li>200-300 words is ideal </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Keep it rational </li></ul><ul><li>Keep it focused </li></ul><ul><li>State your viewpoint clearly </li></ul><ul><li>Include your title, organization in the closure </li></ul>
  23. 23. Homework <ul><li>Read Chapters 8 and 9 </li></ul><ul><li>Complete a pitch letter to the media </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Structured like a letter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Addressed to a specific editor on your media target list </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Aims to convince editor to write a story about your client </li></ul></ul>

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