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When Data Gets Up Close and Personal
 

When Data Gets Up Close and Personal

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How Web apps can use Feedback Loops to positively influence behavior.

How Web apps can use Feedback Loops to positively influence behavior.

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    When Data Gets Up Close and Personal When Data Gets Up Close and Personal Presentation Transcript

    • HOW AM I DOING? WHEN DATA GETS UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL STEPHEN P. ANDERSON
    • STEPHEN P. ANDERSON poetpainter.com I help businesses with @stephenanderson ‘Product Strategy & Design’ needs
    • www.getmentalnotes.com
    • How can we use { } to... [goal] www.getmentalnotes.com www.getmentalnotes.com
    • Social Proof Curiosity We tend to follow the patterns of similar others When teased with a small bit of interesting in new or unfamiliar situations. information, people will want to know more! How can we use { } to... [goal] To put people at ease or guide a decision, find creative When—and what—can you hold back? Reveal just enough ways to show social activity. This can be in the form of stats to arouse interest, then tease someone into taking the next (favorited by, number of views, comments), good positive step. You can also arouse interest by doing something unusual reviews/ testimonials, or by providing visibility into the actions and unexpected—people will stick around long enough to or outcomes of other users’ behaviors. determine what’s going on. Similarly, puzzles are intriguing. See also: Bystander Effect, Testimonials, Identification See also: Pattern Recognition, Badges, Gifting Mental Notes Sneak Preview | Find out more at www.getmentalnotes.com www.getmentalnotes.com
    • This presentation >
    • (and retweets)
    • This presentation >
    • 3 Quick Stories (the origins of this presentation)
    • “feedback loops that affect behavior”
    • www.afterthemeeting.com www.goalsmashers.com
    • Something new?
    • 1. “TEMPERANCE. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation.” 2. “SILENCE. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation.” 3. “ORDER. Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time.” 4. “RESOLUTION. Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve.” 5. “FRUGALITY. Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e., waste nothing.” 6. “INDUSTRY. Lose no time; be always employ’d in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions.” 7. “SINCERITY. Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly, and, if you speak, speak accordingly.” 8. “JUSTICE. Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty.” 9. “MODERATION. Avoid extremes; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve.” 10. “CLEANLINESS. Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation.” 11. “TRANQUILLITY. Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable.” 12. “CHASTITY. Rarely use venery but for health or offspring, never to dullness, weakness, or the injury of your own or another’s peace or reputation.” 13. “HUMILITY. Imitate Jesus and Socrates.”
    • 2008 Personal annual report for Stephen Anderson Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Austin Miami San Francisco Seattle Mountain View New York Franklin Minneapolis Mar 07 to Mar 11 Apr 10 to Apr 14 Apr 20 to Apr 22 Aug 21 to Aug 23 September 24 Sep 24 to Sep 26 Nov 06 to Nov 09 Dec 09 to Dec 11 You took 17 trips in 2008, which added In 2008, you spent up to 55,753 km or 15% of the distance to the moon. 323 43 In 2008, you mostly coincided with: You have 52 travellers in your network. They travelled a total of 1,753,265 km in 2008, and everyone on Dopplr Kevin travelled a total of 1331.4 million km or 8.9 AU in 2008: the approximate distance to Saturn from the Earth as in Austin, Miami and San Francisco of January 2009. Peter Your personal velocity for 2008 was 6.36 in Austin, Miami and Berkeley km/h, which is about the same as a duck. You spent the longest in Minneapolis, Jesse Spalding Your carbon for 2008 has a tip: Jay Lots of great farmer's markets in the summer! The 5 most popular cities in your network are San in Minneapolis Minneapolis Farmer's Market on Lyndale Ave and Francisco, Austin, New York, Miami and Chicago. Cesar Chavez Ave or Nicollet Mall Chris http://www.mplsfarmersmarket.com/ in Miami and San Francisco Mill City Farmer's Market on Chicago Ave and 2nd St. The furthest distance you travelled was to New York S Brandon (4,120 km from Mountain View), which is the 2nd most ... popular city on Dopplr. The shortest distance you 6,606 kg CO2 in Miami and San Francisco travelled was to Austin (322 km from Plano), which is See more on the city page for Minneapolis on Dopplr. Based on figures from Fueleconomy.gov, 1 x Hummer the 21st most popular city on Dopplr. H3 4WD truck produces nearly 10 metric tonnes of CO2 a year. The visualisation above uses this figure to illustrate your carbon from Dopplr as calculated by our friends at http://amee.cc and is an approximation only. The city images above sourced from Flickr and are used under a Creative Commons Attribution Licence: by pusgums, brickell by alexdecarvalho, Passing Under The Golden Gate Bridge by Dawn Endico, Seattle, Washington by fddi1, Apple I keyboard by Marcin Wichary, smokin by mudpig and Spoonbridge and Cherry by TimWilson.
    • (not new, but accelerating and spreading)
    • So what?
    • I think the Wii Fit represents a much more fundamental shift....
    • http://www.lostgarden.com/2008/06/what-actitivies-that-can-be-turned-into.html
    • We've had other exercise equipment around the house before, as well as gym memberships, yoga classes, etc. None of them has been as motivating as a simple set of exercises wrapped in a system of game-like rewards. My wife's experience with Wii Fit speaks volumes about games potential to turn an often mundane activity into entertainment that is delightful, exploratory and highly meaningful. http://www.lostgarden.com/2008/06/what-actitivies-that-can-be-turned-into.html
    • We've had other exercise equipment around the house before, as well as gym memberships, yoga classes, etc. None of them has been as motivating as a simple set of exercises wrapped in a system of game-like rewards. My wife's experience with Wii Fit speaks volumes about games potential to turn an often mundane activity into entertainment that is delightful, exploratory and highly meaningful. http://www.lostgarden.com/2008/06/what-actitivies-that-can-be-turned-into.html
    • We've had other exercise equipment around the house before, as well as gym memberships, yoga classes, etc. None of them has been as Could as simple motivating o bset of rue ofwrapped this aals e texercises in a systemapgame-likens? of plicatio rewards. My wife's business with Wii Fit speaks volumes about experience games potential to turn an often mundane activity into entertainment that is delightful, exploratory and highly meaningful. http://www.lostgarden.com/2008/06/what-actitivies-that-can-be-turned-into.html
    • Performance Reviews Hiring & Recruiting Tools Time Tracking Invoices Health Records Corporate Email Scheduling Apps Project Management Software Investment Tools Sales Tracking Online Training / E-Learning Banking & Accounting Tools Marketing Managemen Knowledge Sharing File Manageme Customer Relationship Management
    • “I can do what’s Hiring & Recruiting Tools Performance Reviews Time Tracking required ofices Invo me.” Health Records Corporate Email Scheduling Apps Project Management Software Investment Tools Sales Tracking “Wow, Training / E-Leara ng Online I’m having ni great time, and getting Banking & Accounting Tools better every day!” Marketing Managemen Knowledge Sharing File Manageme Customer Relationship Management
    • Email + Feedback Loops?
    • Email + Feedback Loops? (a process)
    • Further reading... http://johnnyholland.org/2010/01/27/when-data-gets-up-close-and-personal/
    • (sheet of paper + something to write with) What are you working on, right now? What are some of the business goals associated with your project?
    • What do people have to do in order for your business to be successful? brilliant question from Joshua Porter | bokardo.com
    • behaviors What do people have to do in order for your business to be successful? brilliant question from Joshua Porter | bokardo.com
    • behaviors What do people have to do in order for your business to be successful? business goals brilliant question from Joshua Porter | bokardo.com
    • behaviors What do people have to do in order for your business to be successful? business goals brilliant question from Joshua Porter | bokardo.com
    • 1a. Identify specific business goals
    • 1a. Identify specific business goals 1b. Identify specific pattern s of behavior to encoura ge (or discourage)
    • Business goals (Problems to be solved) I’m lousy at responding to emails in a timely fashion, important emails often fall through the cracks, I sign up for email lists I intend to read but never do, sifting through the avalanche of emails is only getting worse I’d like email to be fun, and not feel like a burden and... I suspect these are a universal problems, right!!?
    • Behaviors to encourage: Never open an email twice Read emails in the order they were received Answer briefly Respond in a timely manner Only check email twice a day (or once an hour) ...and so on
    • 2. Translate desired patterns of behavior into data that can be passively tracked and measured
    • -lots of explicit data already -avoid “asking” for new data -...also look for implicit data (when, where, how long, character length, etc.)
    • 3. Attach points to these behaviors
    • +10 points for taking action! Never open an email twice 0 for opening an email a second time. -5 for opening it a 3rd time. (And so on) Read emails in the order Dealing with an email in the order it is received will get you +5 points. they were received Skipping it will get you nothing. You could set personal goals for this behavior. Answer briefly 10 points for keeping it under 5 sentences. -1 point for every sentence over 5. Respond within ‘x’ hours Responding within 48 hours gets you +15 points.
    • Meh. For this email, you only got 25 out of 40 possible points.
    • “Motivating consumer behavior through game mechanics” points levels scoreboards achievements badges assignments
    • human psychology “Motivating consumer behavior through game mechanics” appropriate challenges points variable rewards levels scoreboards pattern recognition achievements curiosity badges reputation & identity assignments social proof surprise status feedback loops etc.
    • 4. Translate points into a periodic score and other useful information
    • A+
    • A+
    • F inal Score 73% YO U R A F T E R T H E M E E T I N G S C O R E : By completing the 3 outstanding commitments (2 of which * are overdue!), you can raise this score to 92%. A perfect score is not possible for this meeting due to several slow responses. Try to work on this in the future. D E L I V E RY: T H I S S C O R E I S A FA C T O R O F : – decisions made – commitments made (and kept) – commitments completed as promised – timely responses to all requests Commitments agreed to be completed after today’s date do not count against the group score. www.afterthemeeting.com
    • 5. Display the score in a fun way
    • “Personal Velocity”
    • this example from:
    • this example from:
    • this example from:
    • this example from:
    • this example from:
    • this example from:
    • this example from:
    • Ford and Honda's next-gen instrument clusters feature trees (a vine in Ford's case) that grow more lush as drivers learn to hypermile — the fine art of maximizing fuel economy.
    • After just a couple days of using Fitbit, I got hooked on the idea of keeping digital tabs on myself, and I liked looking back at my activity log over a period of time. I started taking the long way walking to and from my Washington, D.C., Metro stop. Rather than rolling my chair over to the printer to grab a printout, I stood up and walked the four feet over to it so I could log a few extra steps. http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703740004574513582518301794.html
    • ...monitoring the bloom was the gentle nudge [Andrew Chen] needed to stay on track. “It’s a nice reminder to be more active without being too numeric or cold...” http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/12/10/fitbits-motivator-a-virtual-flower/
    • The little flower growing represents anticipation and hope that something good will happen, which is the flower growing... When you push that button and see the change, it's instant feedback, a reward. Even though the device seems simple, it's tapping into a complex psychology that changes people's behavior... It hits the right button. These kinds of feedback systems tap into basic human nature... Most humans are naturally wired to nurture things and be rewarded for doing so... http://www.core77.com/blog/news/captology_how_the_fitbit_pedometer_really_motivates_its_users_15582.asp
    • 6. Create Rules to Translate Data into Helpful Information
    • “Ouch! You only responded to 38% of your emails in a timely fashion. This may be due to your lengthy (avg 17.4 sentences) replies. For next month, focus on shorter responses in a shorter timeframe.”
    • You responded to that email in under 2 minutes... That’s much better than your average response time of 8.5 minutes. Good job!
    • PHRASE 1 PHRASE 2 (dozens of different possible phrases) www.afterthemeeting.com
    • 7. Set Challenges (and rewards)
    • An email challenge?
    • personal challenges from friends Less time to respond An email challenge? less frequent checking of email random limitations best streak
    • Congratulations! You’ve earned the “email ninja” badge.
    • Congratulations! You’ve earned the “email ninja” badge.
    • Sidenote: 3 Kinds of Measures: absolute relative incremental
    • 8. Add social cues
    • What would you like to know about other (similar) people’s email habits?
    • What would you like to know about other (similar) people’s email habits?
    • 9. Have fun. Make it interesting
    • Back again so soon? It’s only been 3 minutes since you last checked your email! (Go away!!)
    • Back again so soon? It’s only been 3 minutes since you last checked your email! (Go away!!)
    • What about...
    • 10. Test. Iterate. Proceed with caution.
    • Be careful what you’re measuring or encouraging!
    • PEOPLE WANT TO FEEL GOOD ABOUT THEMSELVES. -Put a positive spin on your comments. -Bad performance? Present as a problem to be solved. -Indicate next step necessary to improve a bad situation. -Adjust target goals per individual (vs absolute).
    • PEOPLE GET BORED WITH THE “SAME OLD THING.” -How can you add variety, momentum, surprise, narrative and similar ideas to your feedback? -mix the unexpected in with the expected
    • Now what?
    • the idea is for a system that makes previously invisible aspects of people’s behaviour visible, in order to help change individual and collective behaviour. -Dan Hill http://www.cityofsound.com/blog/2008/01/the-personal-we.html
    • Feedback loops the idea is for a system that makes previously invisible aspects of people’s behaviour visible, presented in an emotionally engaging way in order to help change individual and collective behaviour. can affect individual and collective behaviors by suggesting and reinforcing specific goals. -Dan Hill http://www.cityofsound.com/blog/2008/01/the-personal-we.html
    • What are your business Goals? Could your application—and users—benefit from offering personal feedback?
    • “That is the best gift an educator can give— to get somebody to become self-reflective” —Randy Pausch, The Last Lecture
    • Get a feedback loop and listen to it. Your feedback loop can be this dorky spreadsheet thing I did or it can just be one great man who tells you what you need to hear. The hard part is the listening to it. —Randy Pausch, The Last Lecture
    • Thanks!! @stephenanderson Stephen P. Anderson www.getmentalnotes.com www.poetpainter.com www.slideshare.net/stephenpa