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Speaking up for Experiences

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For all the attention given to design and UX in recent years, here’s the truth: Most companies are not set up to truly deliver an experience. Consider the rich, nuanced experiences we’ve come to expect from more mature mediums like film or game design. These experiences makes us feel, in deep and profound ways. But pulling this off requires a constant orchestration of things at the systems-level and a laser focus on incredibly fine emotional details. And speaking frankly, things like “feelings” “experiences” and “emotions” — these are intangible things. Businesses are trained to prioritize, quantify, and measure tangible things, that promise a clear payoff. We pit belief–about what will create a great customer experience— against data. Is there a reconciliation between these two mindsets?

In this session on design leadership, speaker Stephen P. Anderson will share his experiences, both as a consultant and as part of an executive team, trying to balance the needs of the business with needs of the customer. He’ll share a model — adapted from game design — that offers to balance theses kinds of “art and science” issues, promising to bring together cross-functional teams and reconcile competing interests. Taking cues from game design, this new model will give you a constructive way to think about everything from designing for emotional needs to tracking key metrics to discerning between “little e” experiences and the “Big E” experience. Walk away with a framework you can use to balance what’s right for the business with what’s right for the customer.

Published in: Design

Speaking up for Experiences

  1. 1. Speaking up for Experiences! Stephen P. Anderson THE ORIGINAL TITLE OF THIS TALK WAS “GAMES, SYSTEMS, AND DESIGNING FOR EXPERIENCES” CXO, BloomBoard
  2. 2. Speaking up for Experiences! Stephen P. Anderson THE ORIGINAL TITLE OF THIS TALK WAS “GAMES, SYSTEMS, AND DESIGNING FOR EXPERIENCES” CXO, BloomBoard
  3. 3. Thinkofadesigned experienceyou’ve enjoyedrecently…
 (somethingthatcanbesharedwithandexperiencedbyothers)
  4. 4. Thinkofadesigned experienceyou’ve enjoyedrecently…
 (somethingthatcanbesharedwithandexperiencedbyothers) A great TV show you saw recently? A game you played? A theater you went to? A Restaurant? A web site? An App? A performance you witnessed? An amusement park? A Class you took? A book you read? AN Event you attended? A Product you purchased? etc.
  5. 5. “Everything changed for me over the weekend when I took the time to write a blog post on Medium.” “As someone who writes a lot of stuff and has used a lot of different writing software, I'm telling you that I was blown away by the quality of the product as a writing tool.” “The entire process is a breeze. And once published, the article looks pretty good too in terms of typography and appearance.” “Intuitive enough to seem psychic.” “Because it is such a pleasure to work with, Medium has become something of a fetish object for writers.” “It does not take a user experience designer to publish a professional story.” “A joy to use!” “It’s so damn beautiful. Medium has removed all the cruft that gets between the reader and the message…” “Clean design, great concept, full of potential treasures to be read.” “The best writing tool on the web.”
  6. 6. Wecouldgoon…
  7. 7. Assumption:Weallwanttocreateand/or enjoymeaningfulexperiences.
  8. 8. Howdoyoucreateagreatexperience? Assumption:Weallwanttocreateand/or enjoymeaningfulexperiences.
  9. 9. Howdoyoucreateagreatexperience? Howdoyoushapetheculturethatcreates agreatexperience? Assumption:Weallwanttocreateand enjoymeaningfulexperiences.
  10. 10. How do you… …create a culture that values quality above all else? …drive focus on the whole, not just the parts? …create and maintain a shared vision of the future? …create widespread empathy for our users & customers …get everyone to embrace the aspirational brand & design tenets? …create a principled organization, that sticks to values—
 especially when it means losing revenue?
  11. 11. CHANGE YOUR PERSPECTIVE!!
  12. 12. GAME DESIGN
  13. 13. GAME DESIGN “Game Design and Interaction Design are fraternal twins. They share almost all their DNA” —Christina Wodtke
  14. 14. Speaking Up for Experiences (SomeWays) Games Create Experiences
  15. 15. AClearFocusontheSingularExperience (SOME WAYS) GAMES CREATE EXPERIENCES
  16. 16. http://www.leagueofgamemakers.com/the-themes-they-are-a-changing/
  17. 17. http://www.leagueofgamemakers.com/the-themes-they-are-a-changing/ The key was to go down a level deeper. At work, we were doing a branding exercise for a product, and we listed off the adjectives we wanted to describe the product. I realized that a similar exercise would work here… I mulled over all the feedback on the mechanics: what type of experience were they creating on their own? What adjectives did players use to talk about the mechanics? Players described the game as simple and elegant. It was calming and relaxing to play. They were surprised and delighted by the richness of the decisions. They said it flowed smoothly, that they could play it over and over again.” — R A N D Y H O Y T , G A M E D E S I G N E R / P U B L I S H E R “
  18. 18. http://www.leagueofgamemakers.com/the-themes-they-are-a-changing/ The key was to go down a level deeper. At work, we were doing a branding exercise for a product, and we listed off the adjectives we wanted to describe the product. I realized that a similar exercise would work here… I mulled over all the feedback on the mechanics: what type of experience were they creating on their own? What adjectives did players use to talk about the mechanics? Players described the game as simple and elegant. It was calming and relaxing to play. They were surprised and delighted by the richness of the decisions. They said it flowed smoothly, that they could play it over and over again.” — R A N D Y H O Y T , G A M E D E S I G N E R / P U B L I S H E R “
  19. 19. This image captured perfectly the feeling that the playing the game produced, and I knew a theme and narrative woven around this could work to produce a great experience. http://www.leagueofgamemakers.com/the-themes-they-are-a-changing/ Tangled
  20. 20. http://www.leagueofgamemakers.com/the-themes-they-are-a-changing/
  21. 21. ?Howoftendowereallyletdesign principlesdriveeveryproductdecision?
  22. 22. ?Howoftendowereallyletdesign principlesdriveeveryproductdecision? adding features pushing back on customer requests prioritizing the backlog how we design a familiar feature eliminating features
  23. 23. AMatureViewofDesigningforEmotions (SOME WAYS) GAMES CREATE EXPERIENCES
  24. 24. Surprise and delight are the high-fructose corn syrup of the experience economy” “
  25. 25. http://www.cnvc.org/Training/needs-inventory http://www.cnvc.org/Training/feelings-inventory
  26. 26. Huh? Our emotional goal is to be Lukewarm & forgettable??
  27. 27. AFocusontheWholevsParts (AKA“ASystemsView”) (SOME WAYS) GAMES CREATE EXPERIENCES
  28. 28. GAMES“dynamic systems with emergent properties that elicit emotions.” (Jesse James Garrett)
  29. 29. GAMES“dynamic systems with emergent properties that elicit emotions.” (Jesse James Garrett)
  30. 30. Production. Direction. Balance. Orchestration. Choreography.
  31. 31. “Designing a product is keeping five thousand things in your brain and fitting them all together in new and different ways to get what you want. And every day you discover something new that is a new problem or a new opportunity to fit these things together a little differently. And it’s that process that is the magic.”  — Steve Jobs
  32. 32. Afocuson“thewhole”changesthings… whatgets definedasa release (core/complete) howyouapproach newproductdesign (it changesto a holistic,iterative cycleofprototyping andplaying) whatyoudecide tomeasure …andmuchmore!!
  33. 33. “Arewereallythatfaroff?”
  34. 34. “Howwouldyoudoitanyotherway?”
  35. 35. “I feel UX is where game design was with ‘fun’ 15-20 years ago” —Daniel Cook
  36. 36. Speaking Up for Experiences The MDAFRAMEWORK (SomeWays) Games Create Experiences
  37. 37. Mechanics Dynamics Aesthetics
  38. 38. QUESTIONS 20 Pair up with one other person. OBJECTIVE: One person thinks of a thing and the other person must guess it by asking no more than 20 yes-no questions. RULES: Rule #1: Questioners can only ask Yes-or-No questions Rule #2: Answerers can only respond with a Yes or a No     --The two exceptions to Rule #2        "I don't know."        "I can't answer." Note: Questioners may guess the mystery object at any time, by phrasing their guess as a question, such as “Is the mystery object a leather purse?” Count this as one of the 20 Questions. Rule #3: Only 20 Questions are allowed.
  39. 39. QUESTIONS 20 Pair up with one other person. OBJECTIVE: One person thinks of a thing and the other person must guess it by asking no more than 20 yes-no questions. RULES: Rule #1: Questioners can only ask Yes-or-No questions Rule #2: Answerers can only respond with a Yes or a No     --The two exceptions to Rule #2        "I don't know."        "I can't answer." Note: Questioners may guess the mystery object at any time, by phrasing their guess as a question, such as “Is the mystery object a leather purse?” Count this as one of the 20 Questions. Rule #3: Only 20 Questions are allowed. You may ask an unlimited number of questions, but you will have only 90 seconds to correctly guess what the thing is…
  40. 40. QUESTIONS 20 Pair up with one other person. OBJECTIVE: One person thinks of a thing and the other person must guess it by asking no more than 20 yes-no questions. RULES: Rule #1: Questioners can only ask Yes-or-No questions Rule #2: Answerers can only respond with a Yes or a No     --The two exceptions to Rule #2        "I don't know."        "I can't answer." Note: Questioners may guess the mystery object at any time, by phrasing their guess as a question, such as “Is the mystery object a leather purse?” Count this as one of the 20 Questions. Rule #3: Only 20 Questions are allowed. You may ask an unlimited number of questions, but you will have only 90 seconds to correctly guess what the thing is…
  41. 41. QUESTIONS 20 Pair up with one other person. OBJECTIVE: One person thinks of a thing and the other person must guess it by asking no more than 20 yes-no questions. RULES: Rule #1: Questioners can only ask Yes-or-No questions Rule #2: Answerers can only respond with a Yes or a No     --The two exceptions to Rule #2        "I don't know."        "I can't answer." Note: Questioners may guess the mystery object at any time, by phrasing their guess as a question, such as “Is the mystery object a leather purse?” Count this as one of the 20 Questions. Rule #3: Only 20 Questions are allowed. You may ask an unlimited number of questions, but you will have only 90 seconds to correctly guess what the thing is… Time’sup!
  42. 42. Onechangeinrules(Mechanics) …createsacompletelydifferentbehavior(Dynamics) …whichcreatescompletelydifferentfeelings(Aesthetics)
  43. 43. Mechanics Dynamics Aesthetics
  44. 44. Mechanics Dynamics Aesthetics
  45. 45. The concepts & materials that 
 forma!y specify the game-as-system 
 (everything needed to play 
 the game) Mechanics Dynamics Aesthetics
  46. 46. what happens when people play the game The concepts & materials that 
 forma!y specify the game-as-system 
 (everything needed to play 
 the game) How players feel when they play the game Mechanics Dynamics Aesthetics
  47. 47. what happens when people play the game The concepts & materials that 
 forma!y specify the game-as-system 
 (everything needed to play 
 the game) How players feel when they play the game Mechanics Dynamics Aesthetics
  48. 48. Hmm…Howisthisuseful?
  49. 49. what happens when people play the game The concepts & materials that 
 forma!y specify the game-as-system 
 (everything needed to play 
 the game) How players feel when they play the game Mechanics Dynamics Aesthetics
  50. 50. Mechanics Dynamics Aesthetics
  51. 51. Mechanics Dynamics Aesthetics [Offering] Product Design, Development, Marketing, Sales, Support, Partnerships—Everything 
 we make, sell, and 
 support!
  52. 52. Mechanics Dynamics Aesthetics [Offering] Behaviors what people do when they use our product/service Product Design, Development, Marketing, Sales, Support, Partnerships—Everything 
 we make, sell, and 
 support!
  53. 53. Mechanics Dynamics Aesthetics [Offering] Behaviors Experience what people do when they use our product/service Product Design, Development, Marketing, Sales, Support, Partnerships—Everything 
 we make, sell, and 
 support! How people feel when they use our product/service
  54. 54. [OFfering] Behaviors Experience
  55. 55. [OFfering] Behaviors Experience REASONS I LIKE THIS FRAMEWORK: It’ssimple!
  56. 56. “Youcan’tdesignanexperience”
  57. 57. “Youcan’tdesignanexperience” “Experience Design” Design for Experiences
  58. 58. [OFfering] Behaviors Experience …and these are the outcomes We control this
  59. 59. [OFfering] Behaviors Experience …and these are the outcomes We control this REASONS I LIKE THIS FRAMEWORK: Itdistinguishesworkoutputfromoutcomes
  60. 60. [OFfering] Behaviors Experience …and these are the outcomes We control this REASONS I LIKE THIS FRAMEWORK: Itshiftsthefocusfromoutputtooutcomes
  61. 61. Mechanics dynamics Aesthetics Right? (NO!) -> ->
  62. 62. [OFfering] Behaviors Experience …and these are the outcomes We control this
  63. 63. [OFfering] Behaviors Experience
  64. 64. [OFfering] Behaviors Experience 1. Focusing on the outcomes…
  65. 65. [OFfering] Behaviors Experience 1. Focusing on the outcomes… 2. …Changes what we do here
  66. 66. [OFfering] Behaviors Experience 1. Focusing on the outcomes… 2. …Changes what we do here REASONS I LIKE THIS FRAMEWORK: Itshiftsthefocusfromoutputtooutcomes
  67. 67. Medium Blogger, Wordpress
  68. 68. Medium Blogger, Wordpress • Designed more like a magazine. • Designed a social system to create a built-in audience for new authors • Launched with published authors 
 (which set really high bar for content) • Hired former Wired.com editor Evan Hansen as an editor for the site • Bought the long-form journalism startup Matter • Created what is arguably the best writing tool on the planet • Promoted contextual comments • Focused on typographic UI details that compete w/ centuries of print (vs other web platforms) • Focused A LOT on quality content • Offered pre-publishing feedback
  69. 69. “We shape our buildings 
 and afterwards our buildings shape us.” —Winston Churchill
  70. 70. [OFfering] Behaviors Experience User Orientation Business Orientation
  71. 71. [OFfering] Behaviors Experience REASONS I LIKE THIS FRAMEWORK: ItemphasizestheExperience-firstorientation User Orientation Business Orientation
  72. 72. Thinking about the player encourages experience-driven (as opposed to feature-driven) design. As such, we begin our investigation with a discussion of Aesthetics, and continue on to Dynamics, finishing with the underlying Mechanics.
  73. 73. “One of the things I’ve always found is that you’ve got to start with the customer experience and work backwards…”  — Steve Jobs 1997
  74. 74. “To build great products, you need to start with what people are experiencing.” —Robert Brunner http://www.idsa.org/news/member-news/start-what-people-are-experiencing
  75. 75. Meaningful Pleasurable Convenient Usable Reliable Functional (Useful) Focused on Experiences (People, Activities, Context) Focused on Tasks (Products, Features) © 2006 Stephen P. Anderson | poetp SUBJECTIVE / QUALITATIVE OBJECTIVE / QUANTIFIABLE Has personal significance Memorable experience worth sharing Super easy to use, works like I think Can be used without difficulty Is available and accurate Works as programmed Prioritize Aesthetics (no, not Graphic Design) (visual, behaviors, sounds, psychology) Design for FLOW (boredom vs anxiety) Leverage Game Mechanics/Learning Theory (completeness) Have a Personality Create conversational and context aware interactions (“Adaptive Interfaces”; narrative IA structures) Elicit Desire (Limited availability, limited access, curious and seductive experiences)Simplify, organize, and clarify Display information visually Reduce features and complexity Use language for more natural Add features that support desired ine browsing) Have a believable story Co-create value with customers Connect people in community Are part of a bigger system Appeal to emotional, spiritual, and Create a tolerance for faults at Are tied to a person’s self-image, highly personal Creating Pleasurable Interfaces: Getting fom Tasks to Experiences presented by Stephen P. Anderson | Nov 8, 2006 “It is not enough that we b products that function, tha understandable and usable we also need to build produ that bring joy and excitem pleasure and fun, and yes beauty, to people’s lives.” THIS IS THE“CHASM”THAT IS REALLY, REALLY HARD FOR ORGANIZATIONS TO CROSS
  76. 76. Experience Focus Product Focus
  77. 77. Experience Focus Product Focus
  78. 78. people, activities & context tasks & features outcomes and experiences output and functionality perceptions, emotions, attention, memory… interfaces, interactions, usability, etc. Experience Focus Product Focus
  79. 79. “Untilmyplayersfeel__________,Iwillnotship”
  80. 80. “Untilmyplayersfeel__________,Iwillnotship” “Games often ship late because they ship based on exit criteria, not deadlines… Either you ship something tiny before you run out of money, or you ship late something that is sufficiently fun. The first are higher risk, but if the core works, they’ll make it.” —Christina Wodtke
  81. 81. Business Orientation [OFfering] Behaviors Experience User Orientation
  82. 82. Business Orientation [OFfering] Behaviors Experience REASONS I LIKE THIS FRAMEWORK: Itreinforcesaoneteammentality User Orientation
  83. 83. Behaviors Experience REASONS I LIKE THIS FRAMEWORK: Thewhole‘UXisnotUI’thing! User Orientation Business Orientation [OFfering]
  84. 84. “UXisnotUI”
  85. 85. Mechanics Dynamics Aesthetics
  86. 86. This is the game! Mechanics Dynamics Aesthetics This is NOT the game!
  87. 87. Mechanics Dynamics Aesthetics 20 Questions You playing 20 questions
  88. 88. This is the game! Mechanics Dynamics Aesthetics This is NOT the game! 20 Questions You playing 20 questions
  89. 89. Behaviors Experience User Orientation Business Orientation [OFfering] The MODEL!
  90. 90. Speaking Up for Experiences Behaviors, Experiences, & Metrics (SomeWays) Games Create Experiences The MDAFRAMEWORK
  91. 91. How do you… …create a culture that values quality above all else? …drive focus on the whole, not just the parts? …create and maintain a shared vision of the future? …create widespread empathy for our users & customers …get everyone to embrace the aspirational brand & design tenets? …create a principled organization, that sticks to values—
 especially when it means losing revenue?
  92. 92. How do you… …create a culture that values quality above all else? …drive focus on the whole, not just the parts? …create and maintain a shared vision of the future? …create widespread empathy for our users & customers …get everyone to embrace the aspirational brand & design tenets? …create a principled organization, that sticks to values—
 especially when it means losing revenue? …justify investing in what is fundamentally intangible?
  93. 93. Thingstoldwithnumbers getformalsupport. Realization#1:
  94. 94. Thingstoldwithnumbers getformalsupport. Realization#1: Storiesandanecdotes
 maywinhearts,but
  95. 95. “If you can quantify something, 
 you can rationalize it.” https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/future-work-nitya-mallikarjun?trk=prof-post —Nitya Mallikarjun
  96. 96. Behaviors Experience User Orientation Business Orientation [OFfering] Whatdowemeasure?
  97. 97. We’renotreallymeasuring experience,yet. Realization#2:
  98. 98. CreateagreatExperience. MeasureBehaviors. Rinse.Repeat.
  99. 99. CreateagreatExperience. MeasureBehaviors?! Rinse.Repeat.
  100. 100. However, when a team manages to get a KPI that sticks, the power it brings to the organization is remarkable. It helps everyone focus around the experience, giving a common language and understanding to how great design makes a great business. What Goes Into an Effective UX KPI? Behavior based: The team was measuring the customer-service representative’s behavior with the product. As they change the design, they get new behaviors. If those new behaviors reduce tool time, then the team can tell they’ve improved the design. https://articles.uie.com/kj_technique/ UIE c. 2004
  101. 101. However, when a team manages to get a KPI that sticks, the power it brings to the organization is remarkable. It helps everyone focus around the experience, giving a common language and understanding to how great design makes a great business. What Goes Into an Effective UX KPI? Behavior based: The team was measuring the customer-service representative’s behavior with the product. As they change the design, they get new behaviors. If those new behaviors reduce tool time, then the team can tell they’ve improved the design. https://articles.uie.com/kj_technique/ UIE c. 2004
  102. 102. Adaptive Path, mid 2000s
  103. 103. Experience Behaviors Time Increase BASIC USABILITY
  104. 104. It’sdangeroustoequategoodbehavioral data(conversionmetrics,fastercheckout, etc.)withagoodexperience. Realization#3:
  105. 105. FREE In-App Purchases + Context:BrowsingAppStoreGames
  106. 106. ExperienceBehaviors FREE In-App Purchases +
  107. 107. Context:BookingaHotelRoom Don’t miss out! 12 other people are looking at this room right now.
  108. 108. ExperienceBehaviors Don’t miss out! 12 other people are looking at this room right now.
  109. 109. “Uh…Didyoureallyjust gothere,Stephen?”
  110. 110. ShortTermGainsvsLongTermOrganicGrowth
  111. 111. ShortTermGainsvsLongTermOrganicGrowth Amazon Routinely takes beating from investors who want quarterly returns, but the company continues to grow with a vision that looks out 7 years Apple 
 Upon Jobs returning the late 90s, he certainly focused on keeping the company alive but also made notable bets on a future several years out [Stock Market] That value of quarterly earnings reports gets questioned all the time…
  112. 112. [AmajorAmericanbankspecializing increditcards,homeloans,auto loans,bankingandsavingsproducts.] Theirinternalgoal? •Sell,cross-sell,up-selladditionalservices!
  113. 113. [AmajorAmericanbankspecializing increditcards,homeloans,auto loans,bankingandsavingsproducts.] Theirinternalgoal? •Sell,cross-sell,up-selladditionalservices!
  114. 114. [AdifferentmajorAmericanbank specializingincreditcards,home loans,autoloans,bankingand savingsproducts.]
  115. 115. [AdifferentmajorAmericanbank specializingincreditcards,home loans,autoloans,bankingand savingsproducts.] Theirinternalgoals?
  116. 116. [AdifferentmajorAmericanbank specializingincreditcards,home loans,autoloans,bankingand savingsproducts.] Theirinternalgoals? •Improvepeoplesliveswithgoodcreditdecisions. •Improvecreditscores •Helpcustomerspayoffaloanearly •Keeppeopleincarsbybeingflexiblewithpayment terms •etc.
  117. 117. [AdifferentmajorAmericanbank specializingincreditcards,home loans,autoloans,bankingand savingsproducts.] Theirinternalgoals? •Improvepeoplesliveswithgoodcreditdecisions. •Improvecreditscores •Helpcustomerspayoffaloanearly •Keeppeopleincarsbybeingflexiblewithpayment terms •etc. “we have lost money for years in some cases, until we didn’t”
  118. 118. ShortTermGainsvsLongTermOrganicGrowth
  119. 119. Howmightwemeasure anexperience?
  120. 120. Howmightwemeasuretheexperience? Biometric Data? 
 (Galvonic skin responses, facial Recognition) (surveys) Sentiment analysis 
 (and similar) on written text? Natural Word-of- Mouth / Social media? In the moment “How do you feel” surveys
 (pick a face reactions) NPS? “HEART” Customer Effort Score? SUS Gallop CE11 ASQ (After Scenario Questionaire) SMEQ UME SEQ SUPR-Q BERT
  121. 121. GallopCE11 NPS Surveys/
 Self-Reporting
  122. 122. Emotionquestionusingwordsaslabels Emotionquestionusingvisualcues Analysisofsocialmediaposts,opensurveycomments, calltranscripts,andotherfreeformtext Imageresponsetesting Voiceanalysis Facialcoding Physiologicalmarkers(e.g.,heartratemeasurement)
 orneurobiologicalmarkers(e.g.,fMRIimaging) H O W T O M E A S U R E E M O T I O N : Forrester “HowTo Measure Emotion In Customer Experience: Upgrade CXMeasurement ProgramsTo Capture Customers’ Emotions” by Maxie Schmidt-Subramanian November 13, 2015
  123. 123. Emotionquestionusingwordsaslabels Emotionquestionusingvisualcues Analysisofsocialmediaposts,opensurveycomments, calltranscripts,andotherfreeformtext Imageresponsetesting Voiceanalysis Facialcoding Physiologicalmarkers(e.g.,heartratemeasurement)
 orneurobiologicalmarkers(e.g.,fMRIimaging) H O W T O M E A S U R E E M O T I O N : Forrester “HowTo Measure Emotion In Customer Experience: Upgrade CXMeasurement ProgramsTo Capture Customers’ Emotions” by Maxie Schmidt-Subramanian November 13, 2015 Emotionquestionusingvisualcues
  124. 124. Emotionquestionusingwordsaslabels Emotionquestionusingvisualcues Analysisofsocialmediaposts,opensurveycomments, calltranscripts,andotherfreeformtext Imageresponsetesting Voiceanalysis Facialcoding Physiologicalmarkers(e.g.,heartratemeasurement)
 orneurobiologicalmarkers(e.g.,fMRIimaging) H O W T O M E A S U R E E M O T I O N : Forrester “HowTo Measure Emotion In Customer Experience: Upgrade CXMeasurement ProgramsTo Capture Customers’ Emotions” by Maxie Schmidt-Subramanian November 13, 2015 SentimentAnalysis
  125. 125. Emotionquestionusingwordsaslabels Emotionquestionusingvisualcues Analysisofsocialmediaposts,opensurveycomments, calltranscripts,andotherfreeformtext Imageresponsetesting Voiceanalysis Facialcoding Physiologicalmarkers(e.g.,heartratemeasurement)
 orneurobiologicalmarkers(e.g.,fMRIimaging) H O W T O M E A S U R E E M O T I O N : Forrester “HowTo Measure Emotion In Customer Experience: Upgrade CXMeasurement ProgramsTo Capture Customers’ Emotions” by Maxie Schmidt-Subramanian November 13, 2015 Facialcoding
  126. 126. Emotionquestionusingwordsaslabels Emotionquestionusingvisualcues Analysisofsocialmediaposts,opensurveycomments, calltranscripts,andotherfreeformtext Imageresponsetesting Voiceanalysis Facialcoding Physiologicalmarkers(e.g.,heartratemeasurement)
 orneurobiologicalmarkers(e.g.,fMRIimaging) H O W T O M E A S U R E E M O T I O N : Forrester “HowTo Measure Emotion In Customer Experience: Upgrade CXMeasurement ProgramsTo Capture Customers’ Emotions” by Maxie Schmidt-Subramanian November 13, 2015 Physiologicalmarkers
 orneurobiologicalmarkers Galvanic skin response (GSR)
  127. 127. Cohort Analysis
  128. 128. Untilwehaveadirectwaytomeasure subjectiveExperiences,thebestwecan dois“triangulate”frombehavioraland surveydata. Realization#4:
  129. 129. Happiness
 Measures of attitudes, often collected via survey Engagement
 Level of user involvement Adoption
 Gaining new users of a product or feature Retention
 The rate at which existing users are returning Task Success
 Efficiency, effectiveness, and error rate
  130. 130. 4Ds Diversity With how many people are they collaborating? Depth
 How much of the tool are they using? (features) Density Frequency of use (MAU), usage in general (2 dimensions — person/team) Delight NPS/satisfaction score / SUS (10 question scale),Usability Scale, satisfaction vs loyalty
  131. 131. Tobecontinued…
  132. 132. CLosure? •We need better ways to measure experiences •A translation of the MDA model might be useful in a non-game context •There’s a lot we can learn from game design.
  133. 133. Designing a game is in itself an addictive endeavor. The most valuable takeaway is our transformed perception of our daily work. If this short round-up caught your interest… we strongly recommend giving game design a try. https://ia.net/know-how/game-design
  134. 134. Thankyou! getmentalnotes.com Design for Understanding Stephen P. Anderson @stephenanderson www.poetpainter.com | www.slideshare.net/stephenpa

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