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10 New Business Models for this Decade
1. Localized Low-Cost Business Model beta
2. One-Off Experience Business Model beta...
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Localized Low-Cost

Business
Model
Localized Low-Cost Business Model
Localized   Fast moving consumer goods companies looking for new market opportunities for their simple,
Low-Cost    small ...
Localized Low-Cost Business Model
    The Business Model Canvas                                                           ...
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One-Off Experience

Business
Model
One-Off Experience Business Model
One-Off      Big in popularity and unknown for their profit, many social media companies are searching for ways
Experience ...
One-Off Experience Business Model
    The Business Model Canvas                                                           ...
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Beyond Advertising

Business
Model
Beyond Advertising Business Model
Beyond        Traditional media and print companies are looking for new revenue streams and have done so for
Advertising  ...
Beyond Advertising Business Model
    The Business Model Canvas                                                           ...
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Markets Are Conversations

Business
Model
Markets Are Conversations Business Model
Markets Are   Product-focused professional services firms are finite. Economic turmoil leads to severe pressure
Conversation...
Markets Are Conversations Business Model
    The Business Model Canvas                                                    ...
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Low-Budget Innovation

Business
Model
Low-Budget Innovation Business Model
Low-Budget Innovation in fast moving consumer goods companies used to mean bringing in the creative talents,
Innovation   ...
Low-Budget Innovation Business Model
    The Business Model Canvas                                                        ...
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Community-Funded

Business
Model
Community-Funded Business Model
Community   Entertainment- and publishing companies have traditionally been specifically good at talent
Funded      identifi...
Community-Funded Business Model
    The Business Model Canvas                                                             ...
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Sustainability-Focused

Business
Model
Sustainability-Focused Business Model
Sustain-   If green status is what customers want, that’s what they’ll get. Fast moving consumer goods
ability    companie...
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
10 New Business Models for this Decade
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10 New Business Models for this Decade

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10 New Business Models for this Decade (beta)

1. Localized Low-Cost Business Model
2. One-Off Experience Business Model
3. Beyond Advertising Business Model
4. Markets Are Conversations Business Model
5. Low-Budget Innovation Business Model
6. Community-Funded Business Model
7. Sustainability-Focused Business Model
8. Twisted Freemium Business Model
9. Unlimited Niches Business Model
10. In-Crowd Customers Business Model

TREND RESEARCH BY Trend Firm trendwatching.com
MARKET ANALYSIS BY Strategy Boutique Thaesis
BUSINESS MODEL DESIGN BY Strategy Consultant/Graphic Facilitator Ouke Arts

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  1. 1. 10 New Business Models for this Decade beta RESEARCH SUPPORTED BY Trend Firm trendwatching.com ANALYSIS SUPPORTED BY Strategy Boutique Thaesis DESIGN SUPPORTED BY Business Model Methodology Business Model Generation
  2. 2. 10 New Business Models for this Decade 1. Localized Low-Cost Business Model beta 2. One-Off Experience Business Model beta 3. Beyond Advertising Business Model beta 4. Markets Are Conversations Business Model beta 5. Low-Budget Innovation Business Model beta 6. Community-Funded Business Model beta 7. Sustainability-Focused Business Model beta 8. Twisted Freemium Business Model beta 9. Unlimited Niches Business Model beta 10. In-Crowd Customers Business Model beta
  3. 3. 1 Localized Low-Cost Business Model
  4. 4. Localized Low-Cost Business Model
  5. 5. Localized Fast moving consumer goods companies looking for new market opportunities for their simple, Low-Cost small and cheap products are considering the localized low-cost business model. Business Model In essence, this business model is suitable for standardized products and services with minimum specifications and lower customer expectations that can be locally produced and globally branded. This business model will only be successful if the following two conditions apply. The first one depends on significant market presence in metropolitan areas in mature markets. This condition allows companies to leverage on their achieved brand value in emerging markets. The second condition is that the product or service has income generation or self-sustaining features. This condition opens the door to lower incomes in emerging markets. Future market expansion is possible to both other areas in mature markets and higher incomes in emerging markets. The company's most important activities will be cost efficient procurement, marketing and quality management. Design is in the hands of local product and service designers and standardized production is outsourced to local producers. Likewise, energy efficient distribution is done through local vendors. Fast moving consumer goods companies will focus even more on maintaining and managing their brand portfolio. Their low cost structure, micro financed local activities and low prices plus high volumes will result in profitable growth of global market share.
  6. 6. Localized Low-Cost Business Model The Business Model Canvas most relevant for fast moving consumer goods companies 4 Day Month Year No. Key Key Value Customer Customer Partners Activities Proposition Relationships Segments Who are our Key Partners? What Key Activities do our Value Propositions require? What value do we deliver to the customer? What type of relationship does each of our Customer For whom are we creating value? Independent Who are our key suppliers? Which Key Resources are we acquiring from partners? Our Distribution Channels? Customer Relationships? Simple, small Which one of our customer’s problems are we helping to solve? What bundles of products and services are we offering to each Customer Segment? Segments expect us to establish and maintain with them? Which ones have we established? Higher incomes Who are our most important customers? Which Key Activities do partners perform? Revenue streams? Cost efficient Which customer needs are we satisfying? How are they integrated with the rest of our business model? product/service and cheap How costly are they? in emerging procurement designers product/service markets Lower customer expectations Standardized Marketing Lower-incomes Minimum local micro and quality in emerging specifications producers management markets KeyResources do ourCustomer Relationships? What Key Our Distribution Channels? Value Propositions require? Income Channelsour Customer Segments Through which Channels do want to be reached? Metropolitan Resources Revenue Streams? generating/self- How are we reaching them now? How are our Channels integrated? areas in Which ones work best? sustaining Which ones are most cost-efficient? How are we integrating them with customer routines? mature markets Energy efficient Brands distribution via local vendors Other areas in mature markets Cost Revenue Structure costs inherent in our business model? What are the most important Which Key Resources are most expensive? Streams pay? really willing to pay? For what value are our customers For what do they currently Which Key Activities are most expensive? How are they currently paying? How would they prefer to pay? Micro financed How much does each Revenue Stream contribute to overall revenues? Low prices x Low costs local banks/ High volumes foundations Designer: Ouke Arts (ouke.arts@gmail.com) This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA. Business Model Generation Hardcover and paperback edition available at Amazon.com
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  10. 10. 2 One-Off Experience Business Model
  11. 11. One-Off Experience Business Model
  12. 12. One-Off Big in popularity and unknown for their profit, many social media companies are searching for ways Experience to combine third party see-hear-buy products and services with their own ability to offer one-off Business experiences. Model The One-Off Experience business model stands for a smart connection between customers in markets of abundance and their experience seeking equivalents. This business model will only live up to its expectations if social media companies team up with offline event organizers, offline pop-up stores and online retailers. Developing software and engaging in ongoing conversations with their users is simply not enough to do the trick. This business model offers unique experiences to customers at a given place during a specific event. The software platform on which its online communication channels come to life will spark the engine of experience seeking customers. By instant contributions from these customers then and there, the door to the larger experience consuming market share will be opened. Events will have to be combined with commercial opportunism. The social media experience remains free, relevant products and services will have to bought the old-fashioned way. With money that is. Commissions from both pop-up stores and instant online retailers will bring in the revenue. These have to compensate social media companies for high hosting costs and presence and findability costs. These costs tend to rise along the popularity of the social media platform. If this is not absorbed by a parallel growth in revenues, the business model will not be sustainable.
  13. 13. One-Off Experience Business Model The Business Model Canvas most relevant for social media companies 4 Day Month Year No. Key Key Value Customer Customer Partners Activities Proposition Relationships Segments Who are our Key Partners? What Key Activities do our Value Propositions require? What value do we deliver to the customer? What type of relationship does each of our Customer For whom are we creating value? Who are our key suppliers? Which Key Resources are we acquiring from partners? Our Distribution Channels? Customer Relationships? 3rd party Which one of our customer’s problems are we helping to solve? What bundles of products and services are we offering to each Customer Segment? Segments expect us to establish and maintain with them? Which ones have we established? Customers in Who are our most important customers? Which Key Activities do partners perform? Offline event Revenue streams? Software Which customer needs are we satisfying? Instant How are they integrated with the rest of our business model? see-hear-buy How costly are they? markets of organizers development consuming product/service abundance Conversation Experience Offline pop-up One-off Instant engagement seeking commerce experiences contributing and initiative customers KeyResources do ourCustomer Relationships? What Key Our Distribution Channels? Value Propositions require? Channelsour Customer Segments Through which Channels do want to be reached? Online retailers Resources Revenue Streams? How are we reaching them now? How are our Channels integrated? Which ones work best? Which ones are most cost-efficient? How are we integrating them with customer routines? Software Online platform channels Cost Revenue Structure costs inherent in our business model? What are the most important Which Key Resources are most expensive? Streams pay? really willing to pay? For what value are our customers For what do they currently Which Key Activities are most expensive? How are they currently paying? How would they prefer to pay? Online Commissions How much does each Revenue Stream contribute to overall revenues? Commissions Hosting costs presence and pop-up instant online findability costs commerce retail Designer: Ouke Arts (ouke.arts@gmail.com) This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA. Business Model Generation Hardcover and paperback edition available at Amazon.com
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  17. 17. 3 Beyond Advertising Business Model
  18. 18. Beyond Advertising Business Model
  19. 19. Beyond Traditional media and print companies are looking for new revenue streams and have done so for Advertising some time. In the last decade, the number of subscribers has been declining and the market for Business advertisements has not performed much better. So what’s beyond the known horizon? Model Traditional media and print companies need to shift from a business model based on advertisers telling subscribers what to buy to a business model based on facilitating both customers and partners in trust building and on-demand interacting. The business model for media and print companies remains two-sided but with two separate value propositions. It offers customers in mature markets, which are reached through customer initiated research, comparison and review, trusted product and service advice. These are shared with - and contributed by - commercial partners. Second, it offers individuals on-demand interaction with public partners, for example governments, schools and hospitals. Media and print companies will become great in facilitating individuals and groups in sharing, contributing and interacting. All communication will be channeled online and independent review portals complement media and print companies in building trusted customer relationships. Their cost structure will shift dramatically, from paper and distribution to content management and online facilitating. Revenues will be generated from facilitation fees paid by commercial and public partners, and commissions from product and service retailers. What’s beyond the known horizon? Facilitation is the answer.
  20. 20. Beyond Advertising Business Model The Business Model Canvas most relevant for traditional media and print companies 4 Day Month Year No. Key Key Value Customer Customer Partners Activities Proposition Relationships Segments Who are our Key Partners? What Key Activities do our Value Propositions require? What value do we deliver to the customer? What type of relationship does each of our Customer For whom are we creating value? Who are our key suppliers? Our Distribution Channels? Which one of our customer’s problems are we helping to solve? Segments expect us to establish and maintain with them? Who are our most important customers? Which Key Resources are we acquiring from partners? Facilitate Customer Relationships? Trusted What bundles of products and services are we offering to each Customer Segment? Research, Which ones have we established? Customers in Commercial Which Key Activities do partners perform? Revenue streams? Which customer needs are we satisfying? How are they integrated with the rest of our business model? How costly are they? sharing and product/service compare, mature partners contributing advice review markets Public Facilitate On-demand Individuals partners interacting interaction KeyResources do ourCustomer Relationships? What Key Our Distribution Channels? Value Propositions require? Channelsour Customer Segments Through which Channels do want to be reached? Customers in Review portals Resources Revenue Streams? How are we reaching them now? How are our Channels integrated? emerging Which ones work best? Which ones are most cost-efficient? How are we integrating them with customer routines? markets Facilitation Online skills channels Cost Revenue Structure costs inherent in our business model? What are the most important Which Key Resources are most expensive? Streams pay? really willing to pay? For what value are our customers For what do they currently Which Key Activities are most expensive? How are they currently paying? How would they prefer to pay? How much does each Revenue Stream contribute to overall revenues? Content Online Facilitators management findability Facilitation fees Commissions costs costs Designer: Ouke Arts (ouke.arts@gmail.com) This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA. Business Model Generation Hardcover and paperback edition available at Amazon.com
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  24. 24. 4 Markets Are Conversations Business Model
  25. 25. Markets Are Conversations Business Model
  26. 26. Markets Are Product-focused professional services firms are finite. Economic turmoil leads to severe pressure Conversations on fees in business-to-business markets like consultancy, advocacy, accountancy and corporate Business finance. In times like these, it takes more than product development to stay in the game. Model Understanding that markets are not a static product of history and position, but a dynamic snap shot of conversations and interactions, is the first part towards new growth. For professional services firms, the difference will be made by converting non-engaged customers into engaged customers. Product development will be obsolete. It will be replaced by customer relations and conversations. By sharing modular and beta products and services with your current and future customers, companies and their customers interact and collaborate in ongoing conversations. Not only will customers find and follow companies in online social networks, it will be the other way around as well. Employees have always been an important resource for professional service firms, and this importance will be especially true for social media skilled employees. Professional services companies will need to become active with real-time tracking and conversion, with a little help from media partners. This will lead to ongoing product and service improvement and innovation, resulting in lower failure costs and higher recurrent revenues. An involved customer is a loyal customer.
  27. 27. Markets Are Conversations Business Model The Business Model Canvas most relevant for professional services companies 4 Day Month Year No. Key Key Value Customer Customer Partners Activities Proposition Relationships Segments Who are our Key Partners? What Key Activities do our Value Propositions require? What value do we deliver to the customer? What type of relationship does each of our Customer For whom are we creating value? Who are our key suppliers? Our Distribution Channels? Which one of our customer’s problems are we helping to solve? Segments expect us to establish and maintain with them? Who are our most important customers? Which Key Resources are we acquiring from partners? Real-time Customer Relationships? Modular and What bundles of products and services are we offering to each Customer Segment? Find, follow, Which ones have we established? Media Which Key Activities do partners perform? Revenue streams? Which customer needs are we satisfying? How are they integrated with the rest of our business model? How costly are they? Engaged tracking and beta products/ interact and companies customers conversing services collaborate Product/service Non-engaged improvement customers and innovation KeyResources do ourCustomer Relationships? What Key Our Distribution Channels? Value Propositions require? Channelsour Customer Segments Through which Channels do want to be reached? Resources Revenue Streams? How are we reaching them now? How are our Channels integrated? Which ones work best? Which ones are most cost-efficient? How are we integrating them with customer routines? Social media Online social skilled networks employees Cost Revenue Structure costs inherent in our business model? What are the most important Which Key Resources are most expensive? Streams pay? really willing to pay? For what value are our customers For what do they currently Which Key Activities are most expensive? How are they currently paying? How would they prefer to pay? Lower product/ How much does each Revenue Stream contribute to overall revenues?Higher service failure recurrent costs revenues Designer: Ouke Arts (ouke.arts@gmail.com) This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA. Business Model Generation Hardcover and paperback edition available at Amazon.com
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  31. 31. 5 Low-Budget Innovation Business Model
  32. 32. Low-Budget Innovation Business Model
  33. 33. Low-Budget Innovation in fast moving consumer goods companies used to mean bringing in the creative talents, Innovation the marketeers and the producers who started searching for possibilities to develop new products. Business For executives, there was nothing left but to hope for the best. Those days are over now that’s Model co-creation is introduced. Innovation has become something companies can do with their customers, instead of to them. Based on customer observation and customer participation, fast moving consumer goods companies develop co-created products that are improved by early adopters with sample tests. Early adopters are connected to the much larger market share of followers. Although co-creation can take place in off-line development labs, connectivity between adopters and followers is almost exclusively taking place through online channels. Online is also where local customer communities and global trend trackers meet. Fast moving consumer goods companies need to become specialists in customer behaviour, in traditional consumption patterns, but more and more in social and individual lifestyle patterns as well. In a low-budget innovation business model, fast moving consumer goods companies are able to achieve a higher new product success rate with lower budget development costs. Now that’s called low-budget innovation.
  34. 34. Low-Budget Innovation Business Model The Business Model Canvas most relevant for fast moving consumer goods companies 4 Day Month Year No. Key Key Value Customer Customer Partners Activities Proposition Relationships Segments Who are our Key Partners? What Key Activities do our Value Propositions require? What value do we deliver to the customer? What type of relationship does each of our Customer For whom are we creating value? Who are our key suppliers? Our Distribution Channels? Which one of our customer’s problems are we helping to solve? Segments expect us to establish and maintain with them? Who are our most important customers? Which Key Resources are we acquiring from partners? Customer Relationships? What bundles of products and services are we offering to each Customer Segment? Free / Which ones have we established? Local customer Which Key Activities do partners perform? Revenue streams? Customer Co-created Which customer needs are we satisfying? How are they integrated with the rest of our business model? How costly are they? personalized Early adopters communities observation products samples Global trend Customer Followers trackers participation KeyResources do ourCustomer Relationships? What Key Our Distribution Channels? Value Propositions require? Channelsour Customer Segments Through which Channels do want to be reached? Resources Revenue Streams? How are we reaching them now? How are our Channels integrated? Which ones work best? Which ones are most cost-efficient? How are we integrating them with customer routines? Customer Offline Online behavior development channels intelligence labs Cost Revenue Structure costs inherent in our business model? What are the most important Which Key Resources are most expensive? Streams pay? really willing to pay? For what value are our customers For what do they currently Which Key Activities are most expensive? How are they currently paying? How would they prefer to pay? How much does each Revenue Stream contribute to overall revenues? Lower product Higher new development product costs success rate Designer: Ouke Arts (ouke.arts@gmail.com) This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA. Business Model Generation Hardcover and paperback edition available at Amazon.com
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  38. 38. 6 Community-Funded Business Model
  39. 39. Community-Funded Business Model
  40. 40. Community Entertainment- and publishing companies have traditionally been specifically good at talent Funded identification and development. In a community-funded business model, talent identification and Business talent development are radically democratized. Model Instead of talent identification and development, entertainment and publishing companies become exceptionally good at fund and community management. The most essential resource in this business model is the intelligence of a community. In this multisided business model, their are three distinctive customer segments: believers, suppliers and buyers. Believers become members through the online community platform and fund products that are produced by suppliers. These products can be visual, auditory or textual and are bought by buyers. Believers can be buyers can be suppliers and the other way around. Fysical products are distributed through retail stores, digital products through the online community platform. To boost product sales, entertainment and publishing companies partner with media companies, professional producers and distributors. This means marketing, production and distribution costs have to be covered by interest and supplier subscriptions next to product sales. This business model has a different tipping point in different markets.
  41. 41. Community-Funded Business Model The Business Model Canvas most relevant for entertainment and publishing companies 4 Day Month Year No. Key Key Value Customer Customer Partners Activities Proposition Relationships Segments Who are our Key Partners? What Key Activities do our Value Propositions require? What value do we deliver to the customer? What type of relationship does each of our Customer For whom are we creating value? Who are our key suppliers? Our Distribution Channels? Which one of our customer’s problems are we helping to solve? Segments expect us to establish and maintain with them? Who are our most important customers? Which Key Resources are we acquiring from partners? Customer Relationships? Community- What bundles of products and services are we offering to each Customer Segment? Which ones have we established? Media Which Key Activities do partners perform? Revenue streams? Fund Which customer needs are we satisfying? Community How are they integrated with the rest of our business model? How costly are they? funded Believers companies management membership products Community Producers Suppliers management KeyResources do ourCustomer Relationships? What Key Our Distribution Channels? Value Propositions require? Channelsour Customer Segments Through which Channels do want to be reached? Resources Revenue Streams? How are we reaching them now? Buyers Distributors How are our Channels integrated? Which ones work best? Which ones are most cost-efficient? How are we integrating them with customer routines? Online Community community Retail stores intelligence platform Cost Revenue Structure costs inherent in our business model? What are the most important Which Key Resources are most expensive? Streams pay? really willing to pay? For what value are our customers For what do they currently Which Key Activities are most expensive? How are they currently paying? How would they prefer to pay? How much does each Revenue Stream contribute to overall revenues? Marketing Production Distribution Supplier Product sales Interest costs costs costs subscriptions Designer: Ouke Arts (ouke.arts@gmail.com) This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA. Business Model Generation Hardcover and paperback edition available at Amazon.com
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  45. 45. 7 Sustainability-Focused Business Model
  46. 46. Sustainability-Focused Business Model
  47. 47. Sustain- If green status is what customers want, that’s what they’ll get. Fast moving consumer goods ability companies are creating new products and services for customers in mature and emerging markets Focused by focusing on sustainability. Business Model Fast moving consumer goods companies that are serious about sustainability research the ecological impact of their products and services. Facts are needed for research-based green marketing while creativity and locality is needed for green storytelling. Brand defining employees and green marketeers work together with product and service designers, ecological organizations and governments. These research and marketing efforts demand a sustainable premium on traditional low-cost prices. When the market response is insufficient, governments can provide grants for sustainability-focused companies. Customers are reached through regular channels such as retail stores. The relationship between company and customer is based on green storytelling: individualized, personal and local context are integrated in customer relationship management. This business model will be more successful if fast moving consumer companies are active in both mature and emerging markets. Given the lead in green ambitions in mature markets, market presence in these markets allows companies to leverage on their achieved brand value in emerging markets.
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