Disruptive Growth

8,483 views

Published on

In this slide deck, you can learn about the next disruptive waves in your market, how to build disruptive growth strategies and how to prepare your organization for disruptive growth. Produced by Thaesis @oukearts and powered by trendwatching.com @trendwatching.

Published in: Business

Disruptive Growth

  1. 1. How to prepare for Disruptive PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY FUZZYNOMICS STATUS SEEKERS ENTREPRENEURIA GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS HUMAN BRANDS EPHEMERAL HONEST FLEXIBILITY TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES BITTER TRUTHS PRICING BETTERMENT TRAVELERS FSTR PANDEMONIUM BREAKING BAD BETTER BUSINESS PERKFUNDING CURRENCIES OF CHANGE HELPFULL GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION YOUNIVERSE PREEMPTFULL TRIBES & LIVES VIDEO VALETS TWO FACED UBITECH NEW NORMAL INSTANT MAKERS Growth UPGRADIA JOYNING BORDERLESS TECH REMAPPED LOCAL LOVE GET THE MESSAGE HERITAGE HERESY BRANDED GOVERNMENT INFOLUST FRINGE FEVER SIXTH SENSE
  2. 2. Reading guide 1 Disruptive waves and case studies of challengers’ disruptive strategies and incumbents’ strategic answers in ten markets. 2 Three step methodology for gaining customer insights, designing value propositions and innovating business models. 3 Three step methodology for organizing for disruptive growth by balancing resources, power and knowledge. Learn about the next disruptive waves in your market Learn how to build disruptive growth strategies Learn how to prepare your organization for disruptive growth
  3. 3. EPHEMERAL TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES TRAVELERS FSTR Media HUMAN BRANDS HONEST FLEXIBILITY BITTER TRUTHS BETTER BUSINESS GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION UBITECH UPGRADIA BORDERLESS TECH INFOLUST SIXTH SENSE FUZZYNOMICS ENTREPRENEURIA PRICING PANDEMONIUM PERKFUNDING TRIBES & LIVES NEW NORMAL REMAPPED HERITAGE HERESY STATUS SEEKERS GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS BETTERMENT BREAKING BAD CURRENCIES OF CHANGE YOUNIVERSE TWO FACED INSTANT MAKERS LOCAL LOVE BRANDED GOVERNMENT FRINGE FEVER PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY HELPFULL PREEMPTFULL VIDEO VALETS JOYNING GET THE MESSAGE EPHEMERAL TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES TRAVELERS FSTR Entertainment EPHEMERAL TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES TRAVELERS FSTR Non-food retail EPHEMERAL TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES TRAVELERS FSTR Food retail HUMAN BRANDS HONEST FLEXIBILITY BITTER TRUTHS BETTER BUSINESS GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION UBITECH UPGRADIA BORDERLESS TECH INFOLUST SIXTH SENSE FUZZYNOMICS ENTREPRENEURIA PRICING PANDEMONIUM PERKFUNDING TRIBES & LIVES NEW NORMAL REMAPPED HERITAGE HERESY STATUS SEEKERS GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS BETTERMENT BREAKING BAD CURRENCIES OF CHANGE YOUNIVERSE TWO FACED INSTANT MAKERS LOCAL LOVE BRANDED GOVERNMENT FRINGE FEVER PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY HELPFULL PREEMPTFULL VIDEO VALETS JOYNING GET THE MESSAGE HUMAN BRANDS HONEST FLEXIBILITY BITTER TRUTHS BETTER BUSINESS GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION UBITECH UPGRADIA BORDERLESS TECH INFOLUST SIXTH SENSE FUZZYNOMICS ENTREPRENEURIA PRICING PANDEMONIUM PERKFUNDING TRIBES & LIVES NEW NORMAL REMAPPED HERITAGE HERESY STATUS SEEKERS GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS BETTERMENT BREAKING BAD CURRENCIES OF CHANGE YOUNIVERSE TWO FACED INSTANT MAKERS LOCAL LOVE BRANDED GOVERNMENT FRINGE FEVER PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY HELPFULL PREEMPTFULL VIDEO VALETS JOYNING GET THE MESSAGE HUMAN BRANDS HONEST FLEXIBILITY BITTER TRUTHS BETTER BUSINESS GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION UBITECH UPGRADIA BORDERLESS TECH INFOLUST SIXTH SENSE FUZZYNOMICS ENTREPRENEURIA PRICING PANDEMONIUM PERKFUNDING TRIBES & LIVES NEW NORMAL REMAPPED HERITAGE HERESY STATUS SEEKERS GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS BETTERMENT BREAKING BAD CURRENCIES OF CHANGE YOUNIVERSE TWO FACED INSTANT MAKERS LOCAL LOVE BRANDED GOVERNMENT FRINGE FEVER PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY HELPFULL PREEMPTFULL VIDEO VALETS JOYNING GET THE MESSAGE HUMAN BRANDS HONEST FLEXIBILITY BITTER TRUTHS EPHEMERAL TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES TRAVELERS FSTR Education BETTER BUSINESS GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION UBITECH UPGRADIA BORDERLESS TECH INFOLUST SIXTH SENSE FUZZYNOMICS ENTREPRENEURIA PRICING PANDEMONIUM PERKFUNDING TRIBES & LIVES NEW NORMAL REMAPPED HERITAGE HERESY STATUS SEEKERS GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS BETTERMENT BREAKING BAD CURRENCIES OF CHANGE YOUNIVERSE TWO FACED INSTANT MAKERS LOCAL LOVE BRANDED GOVERNMENT FRINGE FEVER PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY HELPFULL PREEMPTFULL VIDEO VALETS JOYNING GET THE MESSAGE EPHEMERAL TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES TRAVELERS FSTR Healthcare HUMAN BRANDS HONEST FLEXIBILITY BITTER TRUTHS 04 BETTER BUSINESS GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION 39 UBITECH UPGRADIA BORDERLESS TECH INFOLUST SIXTH SENSE FUZZYNOMICS ENTREPRENEURIA PRICING PANDEMONIUM PERKFUNDING TRIBES & LIVES NEW NORMAL REMAPPED HERITAGE HERESY STATUS SEEKERS GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS BETTERMENT BREAKING BAD CURRENCIES OF CHANGE YOUNIVERSE TWO FACED INSTANT MAKERS LOCAL LOVE BRANDED GOVERNMENT FRINGE FEVER PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY HELPFULL PREEMPTFULL VIDEO VALETS JOYNING GET THE MESSAGE EPHEMERAL TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES TRAVELERS FSTR Transportation 11 46 EPHEMERAL TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES TRAVELERS FSTR Utilities 18 53 EPHEMERAL TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES TRAVELERS FSTR Fin. services HUMAN BRANDS HONEST FLEXIBILITY BITTER TRUTHS 25 BETTER BUSINESS GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION 60 UBITECH UPGRADIA BORDERLESS TECH INFOLUST SIXTH SENSE FUZZYNOMICS ENTREPRENEURIA PRICING PANDEMONIUM PERKFUNDING TRIBES & LIVES NEW NORMAL REMAPPED HERITAGE HERESY STATUS SEEKERS GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS BETTERMENT BREAKING BAD CURRENCIES OF CHANGE YOUNIVERSE TWO FACED INSTANT MAKERS LOCAL LOVE BRANDED GOVERNMENT FRINGE FEVER PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY HELPFULL PREEMPTFULL VIDEO VALETS JOYNING GET THE MESSAGE HUMAN BRANDS HONEST FLEXIBILITY BITTER TRUTHS BETTER BUSINESS GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION UBITECH UPGRADIA BORDERLESS TECH INFOLUST SIXTH SENSE FUZZYNOMICS ENTREPRENEURIA PRICING PANDEMONIUM PERKFUNDING TRIBES & LIVES NEW NORMAL REMAPPED HERITAGE HERESY STATUS SEEKERS GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS BETTERMENT BREAKING BAD CURRENCIES OF CHANGE YOUNIVERSE TWO FACED INSTANT MAKERS LOCAL LOVE BRANDED GOVERNMENT FRINGE FEVER PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY HELPFULL PREEMPTFULL VIDEO VALETS JOYNING GET THE MESSAGE HUMAN BRANDS HONEST FLEXIBILITY BITTER TRUTHS BETTER BUSINESS GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION UBITECH UPGRADIA BORDERLESS TECH INFOLUST SIXTH SENSE FUZZYNOMICS ENTREPRENEURIA PRICING PANDEMONIUM PERKFUNDING TRIBES & LIVES NEW NORMAL REMAPPED HERITAGE HERESY STATUS SEEKERS GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS BETTERMENT BREAKING BAD CURRENCIES OF CHANGE YOUNIVERSE TWO FACED INSTANT MAKERS LOCAL LOVE BRANDED GOVERNMENT FRINGE FEVER PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY HELPFULL PREEMPTFULL VIDEO VALETS JOYNING GET THE MESSAGE HUMAN BRANDS HONEST FLEXIBILITY BITTER TRUTHS EPHEMERAL TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES TRAVELERS FSTR Prof. services 32 BETTER BUSINESS GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION 67 UBITECH UPGRADIA BORDERLESS TECH INFOLUST SIXTH SENSE FUZZYNOMICS ENTREPRENEURIA PRICING PANDEMONIUM PERKFUNDING TRIBES & LIVES NEW NORMAL REMAPPED HERITAGE HERESY STATUS SEEKERS GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS BETTERMENT BREAKING BAD CURRENCIES OF CHANGE YOUNIVERSE TWO FACED INSTANT MAKERS LOCAL LOVE BRANDED GOVERNMENT FRINGE FEVER PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY HELPFULL PREEMPTFULL VIDEO VALETS JOYNING GET THE MESSAGE Kickstart table of contents
  4. 4. HUMAN BRANDS HONEST FLEXIBILITY BITTER TRUTHS BETTER BUSINESS GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION UBITECH UPGRADIA BORDERLESS TECH INFOLUST SIXTH SENSE FUZZYNOMICS ENTREPRENEURIA PRICING PANDEMONIUM PERKFUNDING TRIBES & LIVES NEW NORMAL REMAPPED HERITAGE HERESY STATUS SEEKERS GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS BETTERMENT BREAKING BAD CURRENCIES OF CHANGE YOUNIVERSE TWO FACED INSTANT MAKERS LOCAL LOVE BRANDED GOVERNMENT FRINGE FEVER PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY EPHEMERAL TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES TRAVELERS FSTR Media HELPFULL PREEMPTFULL VIDEO VALETS JOYNING GET THE MESSAGE
  5. 5. 1. The next disruptive waves in media 2. Challengers disruptive strategy (case study) Online journalism platform De Correspondent successfully crowdfunded €1 mln. by attracting subscribers that pledged €60 for a one-year subscription to the site, which is focused on context-driven content written and directed by established journalists. De Correspondent is constantly redesigning it’s publication platform and social sharing options. De Correspondent remains independent from advertisers. 3. Incumbents strategic answer (case study) De Persgroep is pursuing a strategy of operational efficiency, economies of scale and acquisition of leading digital platforms for specials (jobs and cars). The overall strategic goal is to become a multimedia market leader in its local markets, with a strong performance in digital news media and television and radio channels. Print and digi-tal editorial offices are being merged into brand teams to enable digital subscription models. 1. Disruptive waves in media 1. Crowdfunded media initiatives 2. Location-aware media 3. Mobile media apps 4. Immersive and augmented media 5. Personalized media 6. Interactive and social media campaigns 7. Real-time data aggregation and reporting 8. Pay-per-view systems 9. Limited edition media 10. Collaborative media production Forget information overload: consumers’ desire for relevant, useful, timely informa-tion is insatiable. Consumers will continue to lap up products, tools and services that bring them the right information, at the right time, in an understandable, intuitive and actionable way. Technology will become ubiquitous, universal and impossible to live without. Why? Quite simply because consumers will continue to crave (and build their lives around) the unparalleled ‘superpowers’ that technology offers them: perfect and instant information, absolute transparency and limitless choice. +/+76% revenue growth -/-1% revenue growth 05
  6. 6. 2. How to build disruptive growth strategies in media 1. Customer insights in media Consumers thirst for information as it empow-ers them. It puts them in control. It helps them make the right decisions, or at least makes them feel like they can make the right decisions. The prevalence of mobile connectivity and the ex-plosion of sites, tools, apps and devices mean that consumers can satisfy their cravings almost instantly. In fact, consumers now expect to access information anytime, anywhere and in real-time. But the amount of information out there is vast (and growing every second), modern life gives off an insane amount of data about everything and anything. The challenge is helping consumers make sense of it, in a way that makes their life better. Satisfying consumers is one of the biggest opportunities out there. There are endless ways to do so: offering infor-mation at just the right time, making it easier to understand, offering useful, actionable analysis, or even cutting through the torrent of infor-mation and just giving consumers that which is important (to them). Get it right, and consumers will turn to you, thank you, evangelize you and more. The prize: becoming a trusted assistant, a source of not just knowledge but also insight, helping consumers make better decisions. 2. Designing value propositions in media Print and broadcast content 3. Innovating business models in media Marketing and sales Creatives Intellectual property Format subscriptions Interaction design Media production Local communities Online and mobile content Local customers Designed by Thaesis, 2013 Global Distributors customers Production ethics Print and broadcast content Media brand and reputation Production, marketing and distribution Ecosystem infrastructure Salaries Advertisements Ecosystem subscriptions Smart phones Tablets Media technology companies Shared status stories On-demand / location-based content Ecosystem development Social networks Subscriptions Online and mobile ecosystems Online and mobile content On-demand / location-based content 06
  7. 7. 3. How to prepare media organizations for disruptive growth 1. Organizing resources for disruptive growth Preparing for disruptive growth consists of creating three critical conditions: 1. Controlling existing assets 2. Designing a game plan for growth 3. Mastering resource allocations For media organizations, their current user base is their most important asset. For most media organizations however, this asset has not been solid for at least a decade. Managing the decline is the closest thing to control in this case. Selling or discontinuing specific underperforming media formats can be a necessary step. The next step is to create a compelling growth strategy, which envisions the growth aspirations and innovation pipeline. Growth can be organic, come from acquisitions in the core market or into adjacent markets. Disruptive growth how-ever, comes from creating entirely new value propositions that are undisputedly destructive to the current businesses. Next, map out a balanced innovation portfolio by analysing the gap between aspiration and progress on the one hand, and risk versus potential on the other. 07 2. Organizing power for disruptive growth Introducing new decision structures as part of an effort to reorganize power supports incumbents in formulating a strategic answer to disruption in the media industry. Power needs to be distributed in order to nourish focus on high-potential initia-tives, incorporating those that contribute to sustainable competitive advantage. Strategic intent Focus Incubator structure Growth task force Incorporate Corporate venturing unit Business development 3. Organizing knowledge for disruptive growth To organize knowledge: create metrics, track pro-gress and gain alignment with growth strategy. Incumbents in the media industry should focus on finance, marketing and leadership. Finance to acquire and fuel disruptive initiatives in the market, marketing to commercialize them and leadership to balance the existing business while exploring new opportunities. Finance Acceleration Launches Marketing Commercialization Sales Leadership Balance Profit
  8. 8. Wired Technology magazine features interactive print ads
  9. 9. Blendle Mobile app introduces pay-per-view system for news and media
  10. 10. Getty Images 35 million photographs released for free use online
  11. 11. Entertainment HUMAN BRANDS EPHEMERAL HONEST FLEXIBILITY TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES BITTER TRUTHS TRAVELERS FSTR BETTER BUSINESS GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION UBITECH UPGRADIA BORDERLESS TECH INFOLUST SIXTH SENSE FUZZYNOMICS ENTREPRENEURIA PRICING PANDEMONIUM PERKFUNDING TRIBES & LIVES NEW NORMAL REMAPPED HERITAGE HERESY STATUS SEEKERS GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS BETTERMENT BREAKING BAD CURRENCIES OF CHANGE YOUNIVERSE TWO FACED INSTANT MAKERS LOCAL LOVE BRANDED GOVERNMENT FRINGE FEVER PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY HELPFULL PREEMPTFULL VIDEO VALETS JOYNING GET THE MESSAGE
  12. 12. 1. The next disruptive waves in entertainment 2. Challengers disruptive strategy (case study) Netflix is an American provider of on-demand streaming media available to viewers in North and South America, the Caribbean, and parts of Europe. The company was established in 1997 and has over 50 million subscribers worldwide, with 36 million of them being in the United States. Netflix is focused on constantly improving the user experience by personalized suggestions and increasingly offering in-house produced content. 3. Incumbents strategic answer (case study) RTL Group is a leading European media company with three strategic pillars in free-to-air television and content production: broadcast, content and digital. RTL Group is building new digital growth engines, especially for online video (Style Haul, BroadbandTV and Divimove). RTL Group realig-ned it’s production arm FremantleMedia and invests in the existing footprint in Europe and in new high-growth Asian markets. 1. Disruptive waves in entertainment 1. Unlimited-access subscriptions 2. Collaborative entertainment production 3. Online entertainment channels 4. Interactive and social media campaigns 5. Entertainment and commerce integration 6. Personalized entertainment 7. Real-time format analysis and adjustment 8. Immersive and augmented entertainment 9. Game console and mobile device integration 10. Niche social networks and discovery systems Surprise. Entertainment. Amusement. People will relish brands that bring some much needed fun to the consumer arena. Intro-ducing competitive and participatory formats, embracing humor, or celebrating the unexpec-ted will make content – and consumption – less boring and simply more enjoyable. Each person has his/her’s own consumption realm, where his/her preferences and tastes reign. Cater to an individual with brilliantly customized content, by enabling and encouraging personal expres-sion, or by offering protection from harm. +/+24% revenue growth -/-2% revenue growth 12
  13. 13. 2. How to build disruptive growth strategies in entertainment 1. Customer insights in entertainment Play is a fundamental human trait throughout history, spanning all cultures and countries. Entertainment is fun, and satisfies many funda-mental needs and desires: status, achievement, self-expression, competition, collaboration, to be rewarded, among others. Entertainment captures consumers’ scarcest resource – attention. Consumers also enjoy the sense of connectedness when interacting with others. Not to mention that many consumers are blasé, jaded, sceptical if not outright bored with the seeming endless amount of content on offer. As a result, they will rush to embrace content that injects some much-needed enjoyment into their daily lives, in whatever form that might take. At the heart of each consumer is the desire to express and be recognized for his/her individual tastes, personality and identity through consumption. This is driven by the belief that this expression will enable consumers to shape their own destiny, to be in control. The online experience is fueling this: profiles (that make it all about the individual) are ubiquitous, personalization is rampant and effortless, and the expression of one’s likes, dislikes and everything in-between is easy and constant. 2. Designing value propositions in entertainment Mobile coverage (Premium) content accessibility On-demand / location-based total solutions 3. Innovating business models in entertainment Insight into behavioral patterns Hardware suppliers Infrastructure (license) Large volume contract revenues Infrastructure maintenance Marketing and sales Licensors Installed customer base On-demand / locations-based Shared status / location-based stories Retail customer base Brand (Premium) content accessibility Premium content revenues Infrastructure costs Marketing and sales costs On-demand / location-based development Customer base Total solutions development Behavioral insight revenues Media technology companies Social networks Mass media campaigns Mobile coverage On-demand / location-based revenues Smartphones Tablets On-demand / location-based total solutions Customer service Customer data Insight into behavioral patterns 13
  14. 14. 3. How to prepare entertainment organizations for disruptive growth 1. Organizing resources for disruptive growth Preparing for disruptive growth consists of creating three critical conditions: 1. Controlling existing assets 2. Designing a game plan for growth 3. Mastering resource allocations To entertainment organizations, the ability to produce or buy compelling entertainment formats is crucial. By nature, creative (buying) power is hard to control. What works now, doesn’t automatically work in the future. Allowing the customer base a voice in the development process is therefor a strong asset. To create a compelling growth strategy, which envisions the growth aspirations and innovation pipeline, entertainment organizations need stamina. Whether organic or from acquisitions in the core market or into adjacent markets, growth is likely to require a minimum operating scale. Thinking of lower-quality entertainment propositions opens the door to disruptive growth. The biggest opportunity lies in winning over a new online customer base, that is willing to pay for on-demand entertainment. 14 2. Organizing power for disruptive growth Introducing new decision structures as part of an effort to reorganize power supports incumbents in formulating a strategic answer to disruption in the entertainment industry. These structures are focussed on supporting new growth initiatives and creating focus on high-potential opportu-nities. Strategic intent Support Growth council 3. Organizing knowledge for disruptive growth To organize knowledge: create metrics, track pro-gress and gain alignment with growth strategy. For entertainment organizations, the emphasis is on development, finance and marketing. Balan-cing internal development and external acqui-sitions with the goal to successfully commer-cialize new initiatives is the main focus for entertainment organizations. Intrapreneur fund Focus Incubator structure Growth task force Development Generation Prototypes Finance Acceleration Launches Marketing Commercialization Sales
  15. 15. Beats by Dre Audio brand launches personalized music streaming service
  16. 16. Disney Accelerator Disney's accelerator program funds entertainment and media startups
  17. 17. London Live London's first 24-hour TV channel launches
  18. 18. EPHEMERAL TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES TRAVELERS FSTR Non-food HUMAN BRANDS HONEST FLEXIBILITY BITTER TRUTHS BETTER BUSINESS GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION UBITECH UPGRADIA BORDERLESS TECH INFOLUST SIXTH SENSE FUZZYNOMICS ENTREPRENEURIA PRICING PANDEMONIUM PERKFUNDING TRIBES & LIVES NEW NORMAL REMAPPED HERITAGE HERESY STATUS SEEKERS GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS BETTERMENT BREAKING BAD CURRENCIES OF CHANGE YOUNIVERSE TWO FACED INSTANT MAKERS LOCAL LOVE BRANDED GOVERNMENT FRINGE FEVER PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY HELPFULL PREEMPTFULL VIDEO VALETS JOYNING GET THE MESSAGE retail
  19. 19. 1. The next disruptive waves in non-food retail 2. Challengers disruptive strategy (case study) Benelux-based Action is the leading non-food discount retailer in the Netherlands and Belgium with almost 400 stores and over 10,000 employ-ees. The business generates revenues of over €1bn. per year. Action’s business model differs from that of more traditional retailers because only 35% of its total product range is fixed. Action aims to surprise its customers with a constantly refreshed product range at amazingly low prices. 3. Incumbents strategic answer (case study) HEMA is a general merchandise retailer with more than 660 stores across the Netherlands and Belgium, selling an extensive product offering in every household category under a private brand. HEMA’s strategy is focused on international ex-pansion and generating more revenues from its online store. The extend of HEMA’s product offering is proving to be hard to remain profitable. 1. Disruptive waves in non-food retail 1. Mobile storefronts and mobile commerce 2. Real-time dynamic pricing 3. Producer-to-consumer disintermediation 4. Interactive in-store technologies 5. Concept and pop-up stores 6. Personalized sourcing services 7. Product customization services 8. One-hour delivery services 9. Locally-sourced vending machines 10. Interactive and social media campaigns Consumers have always been concerned with price, but thanks to a range of new technologies, services and/ or attitudes, their perceptions of price have become ever more complex. High or low, fixed or fluid, universal or personal, retailers must respond by deploying price in ever more flexible ways. As consumption moves beyond the merely transactional, retailers must change their attitudes if they are to keep up. Consumers will embrace retailers with meaning and personality: that are open, honest, gene-rous, have some fun and stand for something. +/+32% revenue growth -/-5% revenue growth 19
  20. 20. 2. How to build disruptive growth strategies in non-food retail 1. Customer insights in non-food retail Consumers’ attitudes to pricing are complex and fluid. Meanwhile, their notions of value are fragmented. Even in an individual, attitudes vary depending on time, place, activity, mood and product. Always-on connectivity, new techno-logies (e.g. location-based services, real-time technology, and more) and new business models are changing consumer behavior and attitudes. With real-time information constantly available, consumers can compare prices of the same product in various stores, which, on the one hand, is driving total price transparency. Yet on the other hand, consumers are eagerly adopting services and apps that offer everything from group deals to flash sales to to negotiated bargains to hyper-local offers. Consumers are also increasingly aware that personality and profit are compatible. As stories spread of brands that are successful while remaining reasonable, flexible and helpful, consumers will be increasingly unhappy if/ when they deal with traditional businesses, that are bland or self-serving. Consumers live in a world characterized by constant change and fluidity. Yet too many businesses are still acting as they have been for decades. The gap has never been bigger. 2. Designing value propositions in non-food retail Products and categories 3. Innovating business models in non-food retail Product suppliers Shopping assistants Retail margin Category management Marketing and sales Municipalities After sales service Local customers Global In store, online customers and mobile Stores Products and categories Property value margin Personnel, stores and branding Interaction design costs Interaction design Brands Retail technologies Affiliate revenues Omnichannel customer journey NFC-technology mobile payment suppliers Touchpoints with a human touch Seamless omnichannel experience Customer insight Affiliates Customer loyalty programs After sales service Seamless omnichannel experience 20
  21. 21. 3. How to prepare non-food retail organizations for disruptive growth 1. Organizing resources for disruptive growth Preparing for disruptive growth consists of creating three critical conditions: 1. Controlling existing assets 2. Designing a game plan for growth 3. Mastering resource allocations Non-food retail organizations have many assets to control, albeit control in a non-static kind of way. Increasingly fast assortment changes, dynamic pricing, constant pressure on customer bases related to shifts in channels: few assets are safe bets. In designing a compelling growth strategy, which envisions the growth aspirations and innovation pipeline, an appetite for inves-ting in future success is essential. Growth can be organic, come from acquisitions in the core market or into adjacent markets. Finding disrup-tive growth opportunities is the result from a thorough customer centric exploration. Omni-channel strategies allow for an incredibly larger array of opportunities in terms of assortment and services. Mapping out a balanced inno-vation portfolio is useful: aspiration matched with progress and risk matched with potential. 21 2. Organizing power for disruptive growth Introducing new decision structures as part of an effort to reorganize power supports incumbents in formulating a strategic answer to disruption in the non-food retail industry. Selecting and incor-porating those initiatives that are aligned with the latest customer insights will provide sustainable competitive advantage. Strategic intent Focus Incubator structure Growth task force Incorporate Corporate venturing unit Business development 3. Organizing knowledge for disruptive growth To organize knowledge: create metrics, track pro-gress and gain alignment with growth strategy. For non-food retail organizations the emphasis should be on research, development, finance and leadership, balancing between internal and external influences. Research Inception Concepts Development Generation Prototypes Finance Acceleration Launches Leadership Balance Profit
  22. 22. Amazon Etailer’s smartphone automatically recognizes products and links to store
  23. 23. Walmart Retailer’s price comparison service automatically reimburses shoppers
  24. 24. Fetch Personal buying app sources lowest-priced garments
  25. 25. Food EPHEMERAL TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES TRAVELERS FSTR retail HUMAN BRANDS HONEST FLEXIBILITY BITTER TRUTHS BETTER BUSINESS GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION UBITECH UPGRADIA BORDERLESS TECH INFOLUST SIXTH SENSE FUZZYNOMICS ENTREPRENEURIA PRICING PANDEMONIUM PERKFUNDING TRIBES & LIVES NEW NORMAL REMAPPED HERITAGE HERESY STATUS SEEKERS GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS BETTERMENT BREAKING BAD CURRENCIES OF CHANGE YOUNIVERSE TWO FACED INSTANT MAKERS LOCAL LOVE BRANDED GOVERNMENT FRINGE FEVER PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY HELPFULL PREEMPTFULL VIDEO VALETS JOYNING GET THE MESSAGE
  26. 26. 1. The next disruptive waves in food retail 2. Challengers disruptive strategy (case study) Hampton Creek is a food company from San Francisco that focuses on finding new ways of utilizing plants to replace eggs in a variety of different products. Over the next five years, Hampton Creek Foods will first hawk its product to manufacturers of prepared foods such as pasta, cookies and dressings – the processed products that use about a third of all the eggs. The com-pany’s goal is to replace all factory-farmed eggs. 3. Incumbents strategic answer (case study) Unilever, founded in 1930, is a British-Dutch consumer goods company, specializing in food, home care products and personal care products. The company holds over 400 brands but focuses on only 14 of them, which generate sales excee-ding €1bn. per brand per year. The company is one of the largest media buyers in the world and one of the most innovative corporations. Unilever strives to be agile and to source sustainably. 1. Disruptive waves in food retail 1. Mobile price comparison services 2. Same-day (drone) delivery services 3. Locally produced product platforms 4. Mobile sales of discounted groceries 5. Producer-to-consumer disintermediation 6. Interactive in-store technologies 7. Transformative food technology 8. Personalized sourcing services 9. Innovation incubators 10. Interactive and social media campaigns Despite globalization, despite online; place still matters. Whether driven by a sense of pride, authenticity, convenience and/ or eco-concerns, consumers will continue to embrace ‘local’ products, services and knowledge. Say ‘trends’ and many people instantly think ‘demographics’ and ‘customer segments’. And yes, there will continue to be endless opportunities to identify new tribes and dream up products, services and experiences that cater to their needs and desires. +/+250% revenue growth -/-3% revenue growth 26
  27. 27. 2. How to build disruptive growth strategies in food retail 1. Customer insights in food retail Don’t forget, for the vast majority of the world’s population the vast majority of daily life still revolves around a (relatively fixed) location, such as a city or a country. Consumers are still by and large physical beings. The ‘local’ world is more tangible, more accessible, more visible and therefore more ‘real’. Locally-produced goods offer consumers an antidote to the globalized marketplace, and invoke a sense of authenticity, community, connection and belonging. Not to mention reducing (if not removing) the eco and ethical concerns that hang over mass produc-tion. And when it comes to information, ‘local’ is relevant. While access to the world is great, much of the time what consumers really want is to know what is happening, has happened or will happen right around them. Don’t deny place, embrace it. Connecting your products or services to specific locales will make them more relevant, more exclusive and correspondingly more exciting and desirable. The age of mass, uniform, global sameness has passed and the age of empowering niches and thinking beyond stereotypes has entered. Speak to specific tribes like women, LGBT’s, men, parents, families, urbanites, immigrants, tourists or couples. 2. Designing value propositions in food retail Universally uniform products 3. Innovating business models in food retail Material suppliers Patents and brands Uniform product revenues Supply chain management Producers Marketing Authentic eco-friendly products Global customers Local customers Global distribution networks Purchasing power Universally uniform products Eco-friendly product revenues Materials and production costs Marketing costs Local co-creation Local co-creation networks Local produc-tion and co-creation costs Local product revenues Local distribution networks Media technology companies Reviews Locally produ-ced co-created products Local production networks Social networks Advertisements Local production Authentic eco-friendly products Locally produ-ced co-created products 27
  28. 28. 3. How to prepare food retail organizations for disruptive growth 1. Organizing resources for disruptive growth Preparing for disruptive growth consists of creating three critical conditions: 1. Controlling existing assets 2. Designing a game plan for growth 3. Mastering resource allocations Food retail organizations have to control a complex game of logistics, retail and marketing. The most important assets of food retail organi-zations are the relationships with strategic suppliers, the internal marketing power and customer relationships. Growth opportunities become stronger in co-creation with these suppliers and customers. Redeveloping or discontinuing specific underperforming food categories are an ongoing challenge. The next step in creating a compelling growth strategy is to find organic growth green fields and evalu-ating opportunities for vertical and horizontal integration. Disruptive growth starts with the identification of overlooked customers in the lower-margin segments or lower-service sales-points. A balanced innovation portfolio can be achieved by carefully drawing the timepath. 28 2. Organizing power for disruptive growth Introducing new decision structures as part of an effort to reorganize power supports incumbents in formulating a strategic answer to disruption in the food retail industry. Creating space for low-margin initiatives within the current complex incumbent structures is essential to cope with the threat of disruption. Strategic intent Initiate Training unit Advisory board Support Growth council Intrapreneur fund 3. Organizing knowledge for disruptive growth To organize knowledge: create metrics, track pro-gress and gain alignment with growth strategy. For food retail organizations the emphasis should be on research and development, exploring new possibilities to disrupt the industry. Knowledge should not be judged based on current metrics, leaving room for challenging concepts and prototypes to flourish within the organization. Research Inception Concepts Development Generation Prototypes
  29. 29. FoodLoop Food retailers sell discounted groceries direct to shoppers
  30. 30. Instacart Groceries delivered in under one hour
  31. 31. Meal in a Jar Fresh ready meals made with locally-sourced ingredients
  32. 32. EPHEMERAL TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES TRAVELERS FSTR Education HUMAN BRANDS HONEST FLEXIBILITY BITTER TRUTHS BETTER BUSINESS GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION UBITECH UPGRADIA BORDERLESS TECH INFOLUST SIXTH SENSE FUZZYNOMICS ENTREPRENEURIA PRICING PANDEMONIUM PERKFUNDING TRIBES & LIVES NEW NORMAL REMAPPED HERITAGE HERESY STATUS SEEKERS GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS BETTERMENT BREAKING BAD CURRENCIES OF CHANGE YOUNIVERSE TWO FACED INSTANT MAKERS LOCAL LOVE BRANDED GOVERNMENT FRINGE FEVER PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY HELPFULL PREEMPTFULL VIDEO VALETS JOYNING GET THE MESSAGE
  33. 33. 1. The next disruptive waves in education 2. Challengers disruptive strategy (case study) Salesforce.com is an enterprise cloud computing company. Salesforce.com is best known for its customer relationship management propositions, but is also active in collaborative tools (desk.com), social performance management platforms (work.com) and data services (data.com). Sales-force. com offers industry specific products to a number of sectors, including financial services, healthcare, life sciences and higher education. 3. Incumbents strategic answer (case study) Reed Elsevier is a British-Dutch multinational publishing and information company operating in the science and medical (Elsevier), legal and risk (LexisNexis) and business sectors (Reed Business). Reed Elsevier is shifting from print to data and solutions for professionals in a number of mar-kets. It’s venture capital arm, Reed Elsevier Ven-tures, has invested >€125 mln. in disruptive media, information and technology companies. 1. Disruptive waves in education 1. On-demand educational data services 2. Open-source educational resources 3. Educational programmes on wearables 4. Mobile and responsive educational apps 5. Personalized education curricula 6. Curated online educational materials 7. Unlimited educational content subscriptions 8. Gamified educational programmes 9. Collaborative education platforms 10. Free online courses and resources The drive to improve oneself can mani-fest itself in a number of ways, such as the desire for better health, for greater know-ledge, and/ or the development of new skills. Brands and products that satisfy these needs will therefore be ‘better’ than those that don’t. Technology will become ubiquitous, universal and impossible to live without. Why? Quite simply because consumers will continue to crave (and build their lives around) the unparalleled ‘superpowers’ that technology offers them: perfect and instant information, absolute transparency and limitless choice. +/+37% revenue growth +/+2% revenue growth 33
  34. 34. 2. How to build disruptive growth strategies in education 1. Customer insights in education Status symbols come in more than just material forms: health, wisdom, proficiency. These are all appealing attributes, and ones that make consu-mers attractive to others. Self-actualization is up right up there at the top. Mass affluence, and the widespread at-least-partial-satisfaction of con-sumers’ lower order needs is causing many to demand more. Consumers around the world are enthusiastically rushing towards the endless new technologies that are improving almost all aspects of their lives: reducing the friction of daily life, helping save money, or ensuring every experience is maximized or shared. For tech-seduced consumers (i.e. almost everyone), in the months and years ahead a life filled with technology – smart phones, ubiquitous infor-mation, wearable computers, gadgets, apps, etc. – will quite simply appear ‘better’ than one without. The effects of technology – connecting people, consumers, organizations, and objects – are shaping every aspect of culture and society. As consumers spend more of their lives immer-sed in technology’s ultra-flexible, ultraconnec-ted, super-charged embrace, traditional distinc-tions (online and offline; real and virtual) are increasingly inadequate or even meaningless. 2. Designing value propositions in education Knowledge, degrees and certifcates Skills and abilities On-demand educational services 3. Innovating business models in education Public sector Staff Subsidies Education Materials design Local communities Skills and abilities Local customers Designed by Thaesis, 2013 Global customers Courses, guides, lectures, classes, tutors and tools Learning intelligence Methodologies Knowledge, degrees and certifcates Materials Buildings Licenses Content management Accreditation Reputation Brand Media Salaries Fees technology Subscriptions Licenses Online and mobile learning platforms Media technology companies Status stories Communities On-demand educational services Video courses Infographics Games Social networks Advertisements Fairs 34
  35. 35. 3. How to prepare education organizations for disruptive growth 1. Organizing resources for disruptive growth Preparing for disruptive growth consists of creating three critical conditions: 1. Controlling existing assets 2. Designing a game plan for growth 3. Mastering resource allocations For education organizations, their current user base is their most important asset. For educa-tion organizations focused at professionals specifically, this asset is under pressure. Mana-ging the turbulence is needed. Selling or discon-tinuing specific underperforming education propositions can be a necessary step. The next step is to create a compelling growth strategy, which envisions the growth aspirations and innovation pipeline. Growth can be organic, come from acquisitions in the core market or into adjacent markets. Disruptive growth how-ever, comes from creating entirely new educational services that can be destructive to the current businesses. Next ,map out a balan-ced innovation portfolio by analysing the gap between aspiration and progress on the one hand, and risk versus potential on the other. 35 2. Organizing power for disruptive growth Introducing new decision structures as part of an effort to reorganize power supports incumbents in formulating a strategic answer to disruption in the education sector. Focus should be on creating support and selection structures in order for high-potential initiatives to flourish within the boun-daries of incumbent organizations. Strategic intent Support Growth council Intrapreneur fund Focus Incubator structure Growth task force 3. Organizing knowledge for disruptive growth To organize knowledge: create metrics, track pro-gress and gain alignment with growth strategy. Education organizations should emphasize on developing, financing and marketing new initia-tives, that will keep their user base interested in their offering in the years to come. Strategic success depends on the ability to do so. Development Generation Prototypes Finance Acceleration Launches Marketing Commercialization Sales
  36. 36. Coursera Educational website opens offline learning spaces
  37. 37. Non-profit teams up with Google to expand open source learning platform edX
  38. 38. College launches low-cost online graduate program Udacity
  39. 39. Healthcare HUMAN BRANDS EPHEMERAL HONEST FLEXIBILITY TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES BITTER TRUTHS TRAVELERS FSTR BETTER BUSINESS GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION UBITECH UPGRADIA BORDERLESS TECH INFOLUST SIXTH SENSE FUZZYNOMICS ENTREPRENEURIA PRICING PANDEMONIUM PERKFUNDING TRIBES & LIVES NEW NORMAL REMAPPED HERITAGE HERESY STATUS SEEKERS GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS BETTERMENT BREAKING BAD CURRENCIES OF CHANGE YOUNIVERSE TWO FACED INSTANT MAKERS LOCAL LOVE BRANDED GOVERNMENT FRINGE FEVER PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY HELPFULL PREEMPTFULL VIDEO VALETS JOYNING GET THE MESSAGE
  40. 40. 1. The next disruptive waves in healthcare 2. Challengers disruptive strategy (case study) Moderna Therapeutics is a biotechnology com-pany that is researching and developing protein therapies based on innovative technology. This technology is designed to trigger the body’s natural processes to produce proteins inside human cells, supporting treatment of a wide range of diseases. Moderna Therapeutics has signed a five-year agreement with AstraZeneca to discover and commercialize their therapies. 3. Incumbents strategic answer (case study) Philips is a Dutch diversified technology company, with primary divisions in healthcare, consumer lifestyle and lighting. Philips healthcare products include clinical informatics, imaging systems, diagnostic monitoring, defibrillators and patient care informatics. The company builds on its rich heritage with innovative healthcare solutions and well-being products. Their goal is to improve the lives of 3 billion people a year by 2025. 1. Disruptive waves in healthcare 1. On-demand health data services 2. Open-source health resources 3. Smart and wearable health devices 4. Mobile and responsive health apps 5. Personalized online care programmes 6. Curated online health materials 7. Gamified health programmes 8. Collaborative medical platforms 9. Non-governmental prevention incentives 10. Drone-delivered medications The drive to improve oneself can mani-fest itself in a number of ways, such as the desire for better health, for greater know-ledge, and/ or the development of new skills. Brands and products that satisfy these needs will therefore be ‘better’ than those that don’t. Why the future is in technologies that enable consumers to interact more naturally with their environment and in inno-vations, products and services that make life more convenient, simpler, easier or seamless will eternally find favor with consumers. >$400 mln. in funding +/+3% revenue growth 40
  41. 41. 2. How to build disruptive growth strategies in healthcare 1. Customer insights in healthcare Beyond the immediate benefits of maintaining peak mental and physical wellbeing, healthy consumers also accrue status in the eyes of their peers. Products, services, and experiences that promise wellbeing and let users tell a story will cause delight. An endless supply of scientific – and not-so-scientific – studies is published (even by the trashiest media) on the boosts to quality of life and lifespan that healthy living offers. Thanks to wearable tech and an array of apps, consumers can track their daily activity, diet and happiness. One consequence? Com-parison to, and competition with, peers. 10+ years of social media has legitimized behavior once considered vain or boastful. A workout that isn’t captured and shared with a selfie is a workout wasted. Consumers who’ve grown accustomed to paying a premium for access to healthy living, from costly yoga classes to the latest superfood, will adore brands that embed healthy perks into their offerings at no premium. Health providers surely offer instant rewards for participation, but what about long-term com-mitments? Look for traditionally unwholesome activities and transform them into status-boos-ting healthy ones. 2. Designing value propositions in healthcare Treatment 3. Innovating business models in healthcare Public sector Medical knowledge Compensations Research and development Production and care delivery Local communities Prevention Societies Designed by Thaesis, 2013 Individual patients Medical institutions and pharmacies Medical capabilities Treatment Revenues from patents Research and development costs Production and care delivery costs Medical competencies Data and technology costs Monitor and control revenues Online and mobile health platforms Media technology companies Patient communities Patient empowerment Self-diagnosis methodologies Social networks Regulated relationships Big data analysis Facilitation of self-diagnosis Prevention Patient empowerment 41
  42. 42. 3. How to prepare healthcare organizations for disruptive growth 1. Organizing resources for disruptive growth Preparing for disruptive growth consists of creating three critical conditions: 1. Controlling existing assets 2. Designing a game plan for growth 3. Mastering resource allocations In healthcare, existing assets are mostly know-ledge based: medical procedures, specific knowledge, patents and patient intelligence. Controlling is mostly a matter of long-term planning and monitoring. Growth can be diffi-cult due to governmental policies restricting (local) market domination and growth rates. A compelling growth strategy, which envisions the growth aspirations and innovation pipeline, addresses these assets and restrictions. Growth can be organic, come from acquisitions in the core market or into adjacent markets. Disruptive growth however, comes from creating entirely new medical propositions that are undisputedly destructive to the common practice: patient empowerment is the perfect example. Managing risks is inherent to innovation in healthcare, due to the potential impact on people’s lives. 42 2. Organizing power for disruptive growth Introducing new decision structures as part of an effort to reorganize power supports incumbents in formulating a strategic answer to disruption in the healthcare industry. Focus should be on initiating and supporting initiatives that could potentially disrupt the whole industry, funded by the optimization of current business. Strategic intent Initiate Training unit Advisory board Support Growth council Intrapreneur fund 3. Organizing knowledge for disruptive growth To organize knowledge: create metrics, track pro-gress and gain alignment with growth strategy. Emphasis for healthcare organizations should be on research, development and finance of new propositions, based on new assumptions. Health-care organizations should be testing which propositions have the potential to disrupt. Research Inception Concepts Development Generation Prototypes Finance Acceleration Launches
  43. 43. Be My Eyes App helps sighted people assist the blind
  44. 44. Wello Smartphone case monitors vital health data
  45. 45. CarePass Insurance company’s mobile app allows users to monitor health data
  46. 46. HUMAN BRANDS HONEST FLEXIBILITY BITTER TRUTHS BETTER BUSINESS GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION UBITECH UPGRADIA BORDERLESS TECH INFOLUST SIXTH SENSE FUZZYNOMICS ENTREPRENEURIA PRICING PANDEMONIUM PERKFUNDING TRIBES & LIVES NEW NORMAL REMAPPED HERITAGE HERESY STATUS SEEKERS GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS BETTERMENT BREAKING BAD CURRENCIES OF CHANGE YOUNIVERSE TWO FACED INSTANT MAKERS LOCAL LOVE BRANDED GOVERNMENT FRINGE FEVER PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY Trans-portation EPHEMERAL TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES TRAVELERS FSTR HELPFULL PREEMPTFULL VIDEO VALETS JOYNING GET THE MESSAGE
  47. 47. 1. The next disruptive waves in transportation 2. Challengers disruptive strategy (case study) BlaBlaCar is a French community platform that connects people who need to travel with drivers who have empty seats. BlaBlaCar is the largest car share service in Europe, with a monthly userbase of over 1 mln. BlaBlaCar is active in 12 countries with 9 mln. users and an average car occupancy of 2.8 people (as opposed to the general average of 1.6 people). BlaBlaCar’s name is related to a system where users can rate how chatty they are. 3. Incumbents strategic answer (case study) Royal Dutch Airlines (KLM) is the flag carrier air-line of the Netherlands. KLM operates scheduled passenger and cargo services to more than 90 destinations worldwide. KLM employs over 30.000 people. The company focuses on strict capacity management, cost reduction and innovative initiatives aimed at sustainability and customer loyalty. KLM is further unbundling their passenger product in order to realize growth. 1. Disruptive waves in transportation 1. Smart real-time multimodal solutions 2. Electric vehicle charging roads 3. Real-time off-peak travel incentives 4. Urban ride-sharing tools 5. Online intermediates for transport services 6. Real-time dynamic pricing 7. Consumer-to-consumer transactions 8. Personalized transport services 9. Interactive and social media campaigns 10. Crowd-based recommendation and curation The desire for recognition and status is a deep and universal human need, and in consumer societies, people derive much of their social status through the goods, services and experiences they consume. With the abundance of choice, it becomes a statement of identity. Consumers have always been concerned with price, but thanks to a range of new technologies, services and/ or attitudes, their perceptions of price have become ever more complex. High or low (if not zero), fixed or fluid, universal or personal, companies must respond by deploying price in ever more flexible ways. >$100 mln. in funding +/+2% revenue growth 47
  48. 48. 2. How to build disruptive growth strategies in transportation 1. Customer insights in transportation People are social animals, who crave the respect and recognition of others. Now status in society was traditionally derived from having, owning or buying ‘more’ (either literally accumulating things, or consuming that which was rare, or expensive). And while that is still the case for many consumers and in many societies, increasing complexity (in lifestyles, behaviors and attitudes) is leading to a fragmentation of the sources of social status. Indeed, the conven-tional status symbols of mass consumer society are losing their appeal for many individuals, making for a far more diverse ‘statusphere’ than most transportation companies have traditio-nally catered for. Consumers’ attitudes to pricing are complex and fluid. Meanwhile, their notions of value are fragmented. Even in an individual, attitudes vary depending on time, place, activity, mood and product. With real-time information constantly available, consumers can compare prices of the same services, which, on the one hand, is driving total price transparency. Yet on the other hand, consumers are eagerly adopting services that offer everything from group deals to flash sales to to negotiated bargains to hyper-local offers. 2. Designing value propositions in transportation Travel destinations 3. Innovating business models in transportation Affiliate partners Operational staff Lower transactional revenues Operations Marketing Local communities Travel experiences Mass market Online Niche markets and mobile channels Brand Travel destinations Higher operational and marketing costs Service development Concessions Accreditations Reputation Lower entry costs Lower transaction costs Higher revenues from services Local communities Social networks Status stories Services in local communities Network in local communities Affiliate networks Travel experiences Services in local communities 48
  49. 49. 3. How to prepare transportation organizations for disruptive growth 1. Organizing resources for disruptive growth Preparing for disruptive growth consists of creating three critical conditions: 1. Controlling existing assets 2. Designing a game plan for growth 3. Mastering resource allocations For transport organizations, their current market share is their most important asset due to the buying horizon of its customers. This asset is increasingly under pressure however, due to a shift from products to services in travel and transport. More dynamic value propositions require constant customer interaction, which increases the importance of marketing assets. Value chain networks are the third essential asset. Finding growth opportunities starts from customer interactions and networks, resulting in growth aspirations and an innovation pipeline. Growth can be organic, come from acquisitions in the core market or into adjacent markets. Disruptive growth lies in service propositions that lower access barriers for customers. A ba-lanced innovation portfolio is the result of an analysis of risks versus potential revenues. 49 2. Organizing power for disruptive growth Introducing new decision structures as part of an effort to reorganize power supports incumbents in formulating a strategic answer to disruption in the transportation industry. Focus should be on selecting and incorporating high-potential initia-tives, hedging the incumbents for the risks of the waves of disruption. Strategic intent Focus Incubator structure Growth task force Incorporate Corporate venturing unit Business development 3. Organizing knowledge for disruptive growth To organize knowledge: create metrics, track pro-gress and gain alignment with growth strategy. For transportation organizations emphasis should be on finance, marketing and leadership. Optimi-zing profit margins by balancing accelerating pro-ven propositions on the one hand and (co-)crea-ting new added value propositions on the other. Finance Acceleration Launches Marketing Commercialization Sales Leadership Balance Profit
  50. 50. E-volo Emission-free air travel possible with electric aircraft
  51. 51. Urban Engines App aggregates commuter data and rewards off-peak travel
  52. 52. Volvo Automotive brand plans EV-charging roads
  53. 53. HUMAN BRANDS HONEST FLEXIBILITY BITTER TRUTHS BETTER BUSINESS GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION UBITECH UPGRADIA BORDERLESS TECH INFOLUST SIXTH SENSE FUZZYNOMICS ENTREPRENEURIA PRICING PANDEMONIUM PERKFUNDING TRIBES & LIVES NEW NORMAL REMAPPED HERITAGE HERESY STATUS SEEKERS GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS BETTERMENT BREAKING BAD CURRENCIES OF CHANGE YOUNIVERSE TWO FACED INSTANT MAKERS LOCAL LOVE BRANDED GOVERNMENT FRINGE FEVER PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY EPHEMERAL TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES TRAVELERS FSTR Utilities HELPFULL PREEMPTFULL VIDEO VALETS JOYNING GET THE MESSAGE
  54. 54. 1. The next disruptive waves in utilities 2. Challengers disruptive strategy (case study) ChargePoint is an electric vehicle infrastructure company, based in California and active in the US and Oceania. ChargePoint has announced expan-sion plans in Europe, Middle-East and Africa. Its charging stations are public and combined with user subscription plans and utility grid manage-ment. ChargePoint has allied with Ford Motor to provide >5.000 free in-home charging stations for the automakers electric vehicle customers. >$100 mln. in funding 3. Incumbents strategic answer (case study) Eneco is an European energy company supplying daily energy needs to >2 mln. companies and households. Eneco produces, purchases, trades and supplies energy with a focus on increased sustainability throughout the entire value chain. Together with partners, Eneco invests in wind parks on land and sea, bio, solar and hydro ener-gy. Eneco focuses on continued cost control and a ‘customer first’ business model transition. 1. Disruptive waves in utilities 1. Hydrogen fuel cell solutions 2. Space-based solar energy solutions 3. Highly efficient bio-fuel solutions 4. Real-time off-peak energy incentives 5. Decentralized urban energy production 6. Online intermediates for utilities 7. Real-time dynamic pricing 8. Consumer-to-consumer transactions 9. Personalized utility services 10. Interactive and social media campaigns The rebalancing of the global economy, the great convergence, multipolar consu-merism. The shifting of the world’s economic center of gravity and the rise of emerging economies is not just expanding consumer markets, it’s creating new business models. New tools, platforms and products are making the traditional divisions between ‘consumers’ and ‘producers’ increasingly fuzzy. Fueled by the desire for control and involve-ment, the participation mega-trend will continue to grow as consumers jump into in all aspects of the business arena. -/-1% revenue growth 54
  55. 55. 2. How to build disruptive growth strategies in utilities 1. Customer insights in utilities The biggest economic story of modern times is the rise of emerging economies, the (relative) stagnation of many developed economies, and the subsequent rebalancing of the global economic system. This is being driven by the epic and seemingly inexhaustible migration from rural to urban areas. Cities foster higher levels of economic output, unleashing a global emerging middle class who are increasingly powerful. If you’re not asking yourself which business models, strategies, products and services will thrive in this global arena, you can guarantee that your competitors will already be doing so. The convergence of everything from urbanization and subsequent greater population density, financial and ecological crises, online platforms that facilitate education, sourcing and strengthening trust mechanisms means that it is easier than ever for consumers to turn into ‘prosumers’. Collaborative consumption and sharing economy business models that move beyond the traditional buy-own-use-discard paradigm use resources more efficiently and create a better chance of solving some of society’s biggest issues, from employment to the search for a sustainable future. 2. Designing value propositions in utilities Legislation Public value Community services 3. Innovating business models in utilities Non-profit sector Trust Taxes Public representation Public tasks Private sector Public value Citizens Designed by Thaesis, 2013 Civil society Institutions Laws Legislation Elections and governance and co-creation Salaries Materials Buildings Services co-development Civil servants Media technology Media technologies Media technology companies Participation Community services Network Social networks Communication Businesses Network regulation 55
  56. 56. 3. How to prepare utilities organizations for disruptive growth 1. Organizing resources for disruptive growth Preparing for disruptive growth consists of creating three critical conditions: 1. Controlling existing assets 2. Designing a game plan for growth 3. Mastering resource allocations Utilities organizations have largely historically determined key assets: their infrastructure and customer base. Due to governmental policies, market positions are only synthetically changing as a result of marketing effectiveness. Managing this ongoing marketing battle is key to control in this case. Creating scale is a necessary pre-condition in any growth strategy, based on the growth aspirations and innovation pipeline. This makes growth for utilities organizations a matter of partnerships or acquisitions. Disrup-tive growth however, comes from creating decentralized business development initiatives that include customers and communities. These require less investments and can be counter-intuitive yet count on widespread support. Focusing an innovation portfolio on either scale or decentralization is the key question here. 56 2. Organizing power for disruptive growth Introducing new decision structures as part of an effort to reorganize power supports incumbents in formulating a strategic answer to disruption in the utilities industry. Focus should be on selecting and incorporating high-potential initiatives, hedging the incumbents for the risks of the waves of disruption. Strategic intent Focus Incubator structure Growth task force Incorporate Corporate venturing unit Business development 3. Organizing knowledge for disruptive growth To organize knowledge: create metrics, track pro-gress and gain alignment with growth strategy. For utility organizations emphasis should be on finance, marketing and leadership. Strategically balancing building, buying and partnering for the successful development of current and new propositions will win the battle for market share. Finance Acceleration Launches Marketing Commercialization Sales Leadership Balance Profit
  57. 57. Powersmart Solar Pacific islands are completely powered by solar energy
  58. 58. Walgreens Walgreens store set to supply its own energy
  59. 59. City of Madrid Smart parking meters charge energy inefficient vehicles extra
  60. 60. EPHEMERAL TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES TRAVELERS FSTR Financial services HUMAN BRANDS HONEST FLEXIBILITY BITTER TRUTHS BETTER BUSINESS GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION UBITECH UPGRADIA BORDERLESS TECH INFOLUST SIXTH SENSE FUZZYNOMICS ENTREPRENEURIA PRICING PANDEMONIUM PERKFUNDING TRIBES & LIVES NEW NORMAL REMAPPED HERITAGE HERESY STATUS SEEKERS GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS BETTERMENT BREAKING BAD CURRENCIES OF CHANGE YOUNIVERSE TWO FACED INSTANT MAKERS LOCAL LOVE BRANDED GOVERNMENT FRINGE FEVER PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY HELPFULL PREEMPTFULL VIDEO VALETS JOYNING GET THE MESSAGE
  61. 61. 1. The next disruptive waves in financial services 2. Challengers disruptive strategy (case study) American banking company Simple aims to sim-plify banking, giving consumers human customer service, clear and simple policies, and no hidden fees. Simple offers an exclusively online consumer banking service proposition without any physical branches. Simple earns revenue by collecting interest on customer deposits and through the collection of interchange fees. In 2014, Simple was acquired by Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria. >$18 mln. in funding 3. Incumbents strategic answer (case study) ABN AMRO is a full-service bank in the Nether-lands for retail, private, commercial and merchant clients. ABN AMRO admits there is a need for greater transparency in the financial industry and for a more robust financial system. Their strategic answer is a claim for a values-based culture of integrity across the organization, in which emplo-yees consistently live up to ethical standards. In addition, ABN AMRO pursues a growth strategy. 1. Disruptive waves in financial services 1. On-demand financial data services 2. Banking solutions on wearables 3. Mobile and responsive banking apps 4. Cash-free systems and markets 5. Social peer-to-peer initiatives 6. Peer-to-peer money transfers 7. Open-source financial expertise platforms 8. Crowdfunding platforms 9. Personalized financial services 10. Interactive and social media campaigns Consumers crave business models and products that don’t have – or indeed associate them with – negative environmental or social impacts. Which is why the only long-term competitive advantage will be solutions that are good for people, society, and the planet. People are social animals, and will forever enjoy coming together, making connec-tions, collaborating and sharing experiences. The good news? There have never been more opportunities to cater to, benefit from or facili-tate this basic desire. All together now! 0% profit growth 61
  62. 62. 2. How to build disruptive growth strategies in financial services 1. Customer insights in financial services For too long, financial institutions allowed themselves to be blind to the external impacts of their actions. Indeed, this blindness was tolerated if not encouraged by consumers who were happy to focus on what was in front of them: the product, its performance and the price. But consumer attitudes have changed. Driven by the convergence of greater transparency with more progressive socio-environmental attitudes, consumers are paying more attention to previously invisible elements of financial institutions’ processes, behaviours and impacts, and they are not afraid to flex their muscles if they don’t like what they discover. For an increasing number of consumers around the world, status is no longer simply about accumulating more money or ‘stuff’. Instead, these consumers have adopted new status symbols, with social value linked to consuming financial products and services with ethical or sustainable business practices. Conscious consumption is replacing conspicuous consumption. But whether you call it social business, triple bottom line or shared value financial institutions that deliver solutions that benefit people, society and the planet will win. 2. Designing value propositions in fin. services Banking and investments Insurances and retirement services Advisory services Community facilitation services 3. Innovating business models in fin. services National governments Financial resources Operating revenues Financial management Community management Local communities Insurances and retirement services Businesses Communities Offices and agents Trans-parency Banking and investments Supranational institutions Information and media technology Salaries Technology management Secure infrastructure and platforms Operating costs Online and mobile channels Advisory services Reliability and reputation Relational activities Consumers Community costs / revenues Public stakeholder management Social networks Community and educational activities Community facilitation services Financial profits
  63. 63. 3. How to prepare financial services organizations for disruptive growth 1. Organizing resources for disruptive growth Preparing for disruptive growth consists of creating three critical conditions: 1. Controlling existing assets 2. Designing a game plan for growth 3. Mastering resource allocations Controlling financial assets are core activities for financial services organizations. A renewed customer and community focus results in an increase of the importance of customer and community relations. By redefining the role financial services organizations play in our societies, growth opportunities appear. To create a compelling growth strategy, which envisions the growth aspirations and innovation pipeline, financial services organizations have to realign with expectations from customers and communities. By designing a game plan for growth from scratch and possibly in a new branch and under a new brand, disruptive growth becomes a promising option. By mapping out a balanced innovation portfolio, risk and potential can be managed, while building the financial services of the future. 63 2. Organizing power for disruptive growth Introducing new decision structures as part of an effort to reorganize power supports incumbents in formulating a strategic answer to disruption in the financial services industry. Creating power structures that support completely new and externally driven initiatives is of crucial strategic importance for incumbent organizations. Strategic intent Initiate Training unit Advisory board Support Growth council Intrapreneur fund 3. Organizing knowledge for disruptive growth To organize knowledge: create metrics, track pro-gress and gain alignment with growth strategy. For financial services organizations emphasis should be on research, development and finance. Knowledge strategies should be focussed on developing propositions based on external insights and supporting high potential initiatives. Research Inception Concepts Development Generation Prototypes Finance Acceleration Launches
  64. 64. American Express Financial initiatives designed to aid the unbanked
  65. 65. Troco Coletivo Mobile app introduces pay-per-view system for news and media
  66. 66. bPay Band Banking giant introduces wearable payment device
  67. 67. Professional HUMAN BRANDS EPHEMERAL HONEST FLEXIBILITY TRANSIENCE AND TIMELINES BITTER TRUTHS TRAVELERS FSTR services BETTER BUSINESS GUILT-FREE CONSUMPTION UBITECH UPGRADIA BORDERLESS TECH INFOLUST SIXTH SENSE FUZZYNOMICS ENTREPRENEURIA PRICING PANDEMONIUM PERKFUNDING TRIBES & LIVES NEW NORMAL REMAPPED HERITAGE HERESY STATUS SEEKERS GUILT-FREE STATUS SYMBOLS BETTERMENT BREAKING BAD CURRENCIES OF CHANGE YOUNIVERSE TWO FACED INSTANT MAKERS LOCAL LOVE BRANDED GOVERNMENT FRINGE FEVER PLAYSUMERS SWEAT EQUITY HELPFULL PREEMPTFULL VIDEO VALETS JOYNING GET THE MESSAGE
  68. 68. 1. The next disruptive waves in professional services 2. Challengers disruptive strategy (case study) Thaesis, founded in the Netherlands in 2006, supports the executive management, share-holders and potential acquirers of organizations in realising winning strategies that lead to sustainable business results. Thaesis focuses on rapidly changing markets and delivers results in close collaboration with business owners and key team members. Unique in their approach is a extremely short lead time and deep involvement. 3. Incumbents strategic answer (case study) McKinsey & Company has provided strategic advice to corporations and other organizations since 1926, when James O. McKinsey opened a consulting office in Chicago. McKinsey opened its first international office in London in 1959, and has expanded steadily since. It now has over 100 offices in over 50 countries, making it the biggest pure consulting firm in the world. McKinsey offers a portfolio of tools for data-driven analytics. 1. Disruptive waves in professional services 1. Mobile professional services apps 2. Personalized professional services 3. Interactive and social media campaigns 4. Real-time data aggregation and analysis 5. Collaborative services delivery 6. Unlimited-usage subscriptions 7. Mobile storefronts and mobile commerce 8. Real-time dynamic pricing 9. Professional peer-to-peer initiatives 10. Open-source professional service platforms Whether to satisfy their ever-shorter attention spans, their lust for the ‘now’, their craving for real, physical interaction, or to free themselves from the hassle of ownership, consumers are rushing to collect as many experiences and stories as possible. New tools, platforms and products are making the traditional divisions between ‘consumers’ and ‘producers’ increasingly fuzzy. Fueled by the desire for control, involvement, authenticity, self-expression and/ or relevance, the participation mega-trend will continue to grow as consumers jump into the service arena. +/+40% revenue growth +/+4% revenue growth 68
  69. 69. 2. How to build disruptive growth strategies in professional services 1. Customer insights in professional services Modern businesses are immersed in an endless sea of potential services. What’s next? Buy more, or actually do more? Also, as businesses’ pro-cesses become more transient, access to experiences is often as good as, if not better than, ownership of physical assets. Flexibility, convenience, immediacy, participation, choice. On the ‘demand’ side, participating in the business arena satisfies many fundamental and deep-rooted desires: for control, status, relevance to name just a few. On the ‘supply’ side, the convergence of everything from urbanization and subsequent greater population density, financial and ecological crises, online platforms that facilitate education, sourcing and distribution and strengthening trust mecha-nisms means that it is easier than ever for consumers to turn into ‘prosumers’. There are many reasons to celebrate the fragmentation and expansion of service delivery beyond just traditional ‘businesses’. The diversity, inventive-ness, and sheer number of innovations on offer in the business arena is now increasingly closer to matching the range of desires or imaginings of customers, meaning a more satisfying and relevant experience. 2. Designing value propositions in prof. services Smartphones Tablets Laptops Touch screens Wireless sound systems 3. Innovating business models in prof. services Universities Developers Device sales Research & Development Marketing Production factories Apps Local customers Designed by Thaesis, 2013 Global customers Distributors (Online) retail Resellers Patents Touch screens Wireless sound systems Production, marketing and legal costs Knowledge of technological advancements Behavioral research Salaries App sales Service fees User communities Semi-automated service contact Co-creation Account management Smartphones Tablets Laptops Service delivery Technology research Online Online media customers Responsive service propositions Knowledge of behavioral patterns Apps Responsive service propositions 69
  70. 70. 3. How to prepare professional services organizations for disruptive growth 1. Organizing resources for disruptive growth Preparing for disruptive growth consists of creating three critical conditions: 1. Controlling existing assets 2. Designing a game plan for growth 3. Mastering resource allocations In professional services, the ability to keep track with the evolution of clients’ needs is a key asset. An increased specialization of high impact professional services firms is another key asset. By being in control of these drivers for change, professional services firms move beyond the traditional time and materials based business models. A growth strategy that is based on a shared ambition to eliminate risks and create actual change within clients’ organization is needed. Wherever non-standardized problem solutions and facilitated networks are central in professional services, disruptive growth becomes a possibility. Technology and/or net-work form the basis of disruptive growth. Balancing risk and potential can be achieved in collaboration with clients only, there is no such thing as stand-alone service innovation. 70 2. Organizing power for disruptive growth Introducing new decision structures as part of an effort to reorganize power supports incumbents in formulating a strategic answer to disruption in the professional services industry. Creating power structures that support and select high-potential initiatives in close cooperation with customers and partners is key to incumbents’ strategy. Strategic intent Support Growth council Intrapreneur fund Focus Incubator structure Growth task force 3. Organizing knowledge for disruptive growth To organize knowledge: create metrics, track pro-gress and gain alignment with growth strategy. For professional services organizations emphasis should be on development, finance and marke-ting. Knowledge strategies should be focussed on generating, accelerating and commercializing high-potential on the job service propositions. Development Generation Prototypes Finance Acceleration Launches Marketing Commercialization Sales
  71. 71. OpenIDEO Freely accessible innovation platform
  72. 72. Apollo Education Innovator’s Accelerator teaches emerging leaders innovation skills in an online course
  73. 73. trendwatching .com Trend firm helps clients dream up new products, services, experiences and campaigns for their customers
  74. 74. Produced by Boardroom acceleration company Ouke Arts (partner) Partner of consulting firm Thaesis and practitioner at the Amsterdam School of Management Consulting. Thaesis chal-lenges assumptions that underly current business models and develops strategies for companies in rapidly changing markets. Ouke joined Thaesis in 2010 after working at PwC Consulting for seven years with a degree in Information Management and Technology from Tilburg University. Ouke specializes in transforming markets, media technologies and disruptive business models. Ouke is an experienced keynote speaker who delivers engaging, inspiring and forward thinking sessions. Whenever the characteristics of customers, technology and or legislation changes, trends may come to an end. This may then form the incentive for new organizations to enter existing markets which often puts incumbents, which used to have an excellent position, under new pressure. Thaesis explains these events and their influence on transforming markets through different means, such as frequent (scientific) publications Our characteristics • Established in 2006 • Independent strategy firm • Located in the Netherlands • Discovery of business logic • Acceleration of new business • Focus on rapidly changing markets Strategic acceleration at the right moment Our services • Growth strategies • Business development • Business model innovation • Management of transitions • Strategic due diligence • Post-merger acceleration strategies Thaesis supports the executive management, shareholders and potential acquirers of organizations in designing and realizing winning strategies that lead to sustainable business results. The activities of Thaesis can be divided into three areas: strategy, transitions and research. Our 150+ client portfolio includes ABN AMRO, BBC, Bruna, Cyrte, IDTV, HP, De Persgroep, ING, Galapagos, Profile Tyrecenter, Rabobank, Reed Elsevier, Sky Radio and WPG. Transaction (Acquisition) Post Transaction Growth Pre Transaction Transaction (Divestment) Company value Investment Stage in portfolio Strategic review based on market expertise or commerical due diligence Plan for first 100 days and support in executing growth strategy Growth strategy in preparation of divestment 1 2 5 3 Growth strategy in close cooperation with executive management Identification and selection of potential buy-and-build candidates 4 Management presentation and information memorandum 6
  75. 75. Powered by Established in 2002, trendwatching.com is an independent and opinionated trend firm, scanning the globe for the most promising consumer trends, insights and related hands-on business ideas. Trendwatching.com identifies global consumer trends, insights and related innovations. 250,000 subscribers and 1,200+ clients turn to trendwatching.com’s trend briefings and premium ser-vice. Trendwatching.com relies on teams and representatives in London, São Paulo, Singapore, New York, Sydney and Lagos, and runs a network of 2,600+ spotters in 100+ countries. Monthly Trend Briefing One Big Unmissable Consumer Trend sent every month to 250,000+ business professionals in 180+ countries. Region-Specific Trend Bulletins Covering South & Central America (available in English, Portuguese and Spanish), Asia and Africa, each of our free Bulletins is written by our local teams, focusing on local trends and innovations. Premium Service A complete online Trend & Innovation solution. Includes 24/7 access to our Trend Framework, Innovations Database, Industry Updates, the 2014 Trend Report and an Apply Toolkit. Speaking Engagements Our experienced presenters deliver 60+ engaging, interactive and intensely practical keynotes, corporate sessions and workshops in 30+ countries a year. Region-Specific Services We offer region-specific services from our South & Central America, Africa & Asia Pacific offices. Henry Mason (managing director) An accomplished trend watcher, consumer analyst, and presenter. After gaining a first class degree in Politics & International Relations and starting his career at KPMG, Henry joined trendwatching.com in 2010. Henry now runs the company on a daily basis, overseeing trend thinking across all trendwatching.com's free publications and paid services. Henry is an experienced and sought-after keynote speaker who delivers engaging, interactive and intensely practical sessions that show organizations how to both understand changes in consumer behavior and how to seize the subsequent innovation opportunities.
  76. 76. Rethink Revision Restrategize Thaesis Boardroom acceleration company 's-Gravelandseweg 71 1217 EJ Hilversum, The Netherlands http://www.thaesis.com/en/ Timing Phase Key team members Business owners 1. Gather insights 2. Determine ambition 3. Select options 4. Determine scope and timing 5. Determine long term impact 6. Report findings Rethink Revision Restrategize Determine goals Establish strategic framework Evaluate choices Evaluate findings Week 0 Week 2-3 Week 4-6 Week 6-8 Thaesis facilitates business owners and key team members in creating growth strategies within 6 to 8 weeks. Rethink: we focus on customer trends and customer journeys Revision: we focus on added value growth and business models Restrategize: we focus on clear strategic and execution guidelines Would you like to learn how we can help you formulate your disruptive growth strategy? Get in touch today. In need of acceleration? Get in touch today

×