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California

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    California California Presentation Transcript

    • California: a History By: Audria Muscara HIST 141 Dr. Arguello
    • Regulation, Railroad, and Revolution: Achievement and Turmoil in the New State
      • A large portion of California land was claimed as private property so there was little land left for growth and development
      • Land claims had to be validated by a board of land commissioners
      • Many land titles switched from Mexican to Yankee ownership
      • The states capital moved from San Francisco, to San Jose to Vallejo, then to Benicia before it was permanently brought back to Sacramento.
    • Regulation, Railroad, and Revolution: Achievement and Turmoil in the New State
      • As California was growing in the mid 19 th century, many institutions of higher education were established
      • 1852- The state prison Point San Quentin was established
      • Multiple churches and synagogues were built
      • Agriculture and the cattle industry was fueling the economy as much as the gold rush was.
      • Most of southern California remained Hispanic and rancho-based.
      • Many adjusted to American order yet banditry among the Hispanic remained a problem
    • Regulation, Railroad, and Revolution: Achievement and Turmoil in the New State
      • There was a rapid expansion of railroad service in the West that would link California to the rest of the country
      • The Pacific railroad
      • Lincoln and congress passed the Pacific railway act of 1862.
      • Laborers for the six year project were imported. Many were Chinese immigrants.
    • Making it Happen: Labor through the Great Depression and Beyond
      • The impact of the Great Depression was not as crippling as it was to the East.
      • The hardest hit were the unemployed railroad workers; many who were threatened by the Chinese who were capable of doing the same labor for less money.
      • Agriculture, however, fueled the economy and stayed on top employing more than 300,000 people.
    • Making it Happen: Labor through the Great Depression and Beyond
      • 1934- Longshoreman strike turned violent as workers and law enforcement engaged in battle.
      • Unions were established in California and workers would often strike; resulting in violence and gun fight.
      • Cotton pickers strike- (1933) was the largest ever in the nations history
    • Making it Happen: Labor through the Great Depression and Beyond
      • Sacramento Conspiracy Trial
      • During the dock strike, the agriculture workers union was raided and 24 were arrested and charged with criminal syndicalism.
      • Many of those were convicted but then later released.
    • An Imagined Place: Art and Life on the Coast of Dreams
      • Southern California became the epicenter of the entertainment industry at the start of the twentieth century.
      • Los Angeles and Hollywood is where the directors and filmmakers came. Not only was the climate and scenery so picturesque, but it was far from the New Jersey based Trust which imposed taxes on film production.
    • An Imagined Place: Art and Life on the Coast of Dreams
      • New film studios were established here in California. This included Fox, Fine Arts, Warner Bro’s and Paramount.
      • In the 1910’s there was an influx of film genres including comedies, tragedies, drama’s, westerns, and biblical epics.
      • Political influence was easily conveyed in films during periods of war.
    • An Imagined Place: Art and Life on the Coast of Dreams
      • California was also attracting authors, artists, poets, and photographers.
      • Painters were preoccupied with the beautiful Californian landscape. After the Great depression, social realism captured the scenes of daily life in art.