Burj Khalifa - The world's tallest building

1,526 views
1,368 views

Published on

Presentation by Simão, LC14D

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,526
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
44
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Burj Khalifa - The world's tallest building

  1. 1. Burj Khalifa
  2. 2. <ul><li>It´s considerate the most high construction of the world. He was constructed in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. </li></ul><ul><li>Have a 828m high, 160 habitable floors and a 2 background levels to parking. </li></ul><ul><li>it´s the tallest skyscraper raised without support cable. </li></ul>The design of Burj Khalifa is derived from patterning systems embodied in Islamic architecture. Water supply system: The Burj Khalifa's water system supplies an average of 946,000 l of water per day through 100 km of pipes. And an additional 213 km of piping serves the fire emergency system, and 34 km supplies chilled water for the air conditioning system. Air conditioning: The air conditioning system draws air from the upper floors where the air is cooler and cleaner than on the ground. At peak cooling times, the tower's cooling is equivalent to that provided by 13,000 t of melting ice in one day. The condensate collection system, which uses the hot and humid outside air, combined with the cooling requirements of the building, results in a significant amount of condensation of moisture from the air. The condensed water is collected and drained into a holding tank located in the basement car park; this water is then pumped into the site irrigation system for use on the Burj Khalifa park.
  3. 3. Window cleaning: To wash the 24,348 windows, totalling 120,000 m 2 of glass, a horizontal track has been installed on the exterior of Burj Khalifa at levels 40, 73 and 109. Each track holds a 1,500 kg bucket machine which moves horizontally and then vertically using heavy cables. Above level 109, up to tier 27 traditional cradles from davits are used. The top of the spire, however, is reserved for specialist window cleaners, who brave the heights and high winds dangling by ropes to clean and inspect the top of the pinnacle. Under normal conditions, when all building maintenance units will be operational, it will take 36 workers three to four months to clean the entire exterior façade. Unmanned machines will clean the top 27 additional tiers and the glass spire. The cleaning system was developed in Melbourne, Australia at a cost of A $8 million. The contract for building the state-of-the-art machines was won by Australian company Cox Gomyl.

×