BUS 51 - Mosley7e ch11
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BUS 51 - Mosley7e ch11

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Cengage Professor, Karen Gordon-Brown, Peralta Community College District @ Merritt College, Oakland, CA

Cengage Professor, Karen Gordon-Brown, Peralta Community College District @ Merritt College, Oakland, CA
kgordon@peralta.edu

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BUS 51 - Mosley7e ch11 BUS 51 - Mosley7e ch11 Presentation Transcript

  • Part 4 Skill Development Chapter 11 Coaching for Higher Performance Mosley • Pietri PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie Cook The University of West Alabama © 2008 Thomson/South-Western All rights reserved.
  • Learning Objectives Learning Objectives After reading and studying this chapter, you should be able to: 1. Explain the concept of coaching. 2. Identify the four major coaching functions. 3. Describe important skills used in coaching. 4. Differentiate between general and pinpointed coaching statements. 5. Describe an “I” message. 6. Explain the extent to which a supervisor should counsel an employee about personal problems. © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. 11–2
  • Introduction to Coaching • Coaching  Is the interpersonal process that supervisors and managers use to help individuals continually reach their highest levels of performance.  Is a powerful supervisory skill. • Current Emphasis on Coaching  The supervisor is now:   A developer of the diverse employees A facilitator of teams to maximize their potential A coach to all employees—“A”, “B”, and “C” level employees © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. 11–3 
  • EXHIBIT 11.1 Performance-Linked Coaching Through effective coaching, the supervisor can help an employee become an increasingly effective performer. © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. 11–4
  • EXHIBIT 11.2 Examples of Coaching Situations • Assigning a new challenging task; reviewing results. • Determining with an employee his/her training needs. • Showing an employee how to perform a task. • Discussing a plan for employee career advancement. • Listening to an employee’s fears of job cutbacks. • Providing an employee insight into company politics. • Helping an employee adapt psychologically to job changes. • Discussing poor employee performance. • 2008 Thomson/South© Helping an employee manage stress. Western. All rights reserved. 11–5
  • EXHIBIT 11.2 Examples of Coaching Situations (cont’d) • Discussing how a long-term, excellent employee can reach an even higher performance level. • Conducting a disciplinary interview. • Discussing a problem of poor work or failure to follow organization rules/policy. • Conducting a performance appraisal. • Allowing an employee to “blow off” some emotional “steam.” © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. 11–6
  • Introduction to Coaching (cont’d) • Why Supervisors Reject Coaching  Lack of confidence in themselves.  View coaching as a passive process.  Do not want to take the time to coach. © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. 11–7
  • The Coaching Functions 1. Tutoring 2. Mentoring 3. Confronting/challenging 4. Counseling © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. 11–8
  • Introduction to Coaching (cont’d) • Mentoring  The coaching activity that helps develop careers in others. • Ways of Mentoring  Helping an employee see the potentially negative impact of behavior he or she is considering.  Understanding how to approach and gain influence with powerful organization members.  Learning who key players are in given circumstances.  Understanding how past or current events impact the team member’s actions and behavior. © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. 11–9
  • Introduction to Coaching (cont’d) • Confronting/Challenging  Establishes clear performance standards, compares actual performance against them, and addresses performance that doesn’t meet those standards. • Counseling  Helping an individual recognize, talk about, and solve either real or perceived problems that affect performance. © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. 11–10
  • EXHIBIT 11.3 Outcomes of the Four Coaching Functions Tutoring Mentoring 1. Increased technical know-how 1. Developing political understanding/savvy 2. Increased understanding of processes and systems 2. Sensitivity to the organization’s culture 3. Increased pace of learning 4. Movement to expert status 3. Expanded personal networks 4. Increased sensitivity to key players’ likes/dislikes 5. Greater proaction in managing own career 5. Commitment to continual learning Confronting/Challenging Counseling 1. Clarification of performance expectations 1. Accurate descriptions of problems and their causes 2. Identification of performance shortcomings 2. Technical and organizational insight 3. Acceptance of more-difficult tasks 4. Strategies to improve future performance 5. Commitment to continual performance improvement © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. 3. Ventilation of strong feelings 4. Commitment to self-sufficiency 5. Deeper personal insight about own feelings and behavior 6. Changes in point of view 11–11 Source: Adapted from Dennis C. Kinlaw, Coaching for Commitment (San Diego, Calif.: Pfeiffer & Company, 1993), pp. 22–23.
  • Coaching: The Core Skills • Acknowledging  Showing by nonevaluative verbal responses that you have listened to what the employee has stated. • Attending  Showing through nonverbal behavior that you are listening in an open, nonjudgmental manner. © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. 11–12
  • Coaching: The Core Skills (cont’d) • Affirming  Communicating to an employee his or her value, strengths, and contributions. • Confirming  Making sure an employee understands what has been said or agreed upon. © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. 11–13
  • Coaching: The Core Skills (cont’d) • Pinpointing  Providing specific, tangible information about performance to an employee. • Probing  Asking questions to obtain additional information. • Reflecting  Stating your interpretation of what the employee has said. • Resourcing  Providing information, assistance, and advice to employees. © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. 11–14
  • Coaching: The Core Skills (cont’d) • Reviewing  Reinforcing key points at the end of a coaching session to ensure common understanding. • Summarizing  Pausing in the coaching conversation to summarize key points. © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. 11–15
  • EXHIBIT 11.4 Suggestions for Confronting Poor Performance 1. Describe the performance situation in specific detail. 2. Seek and listen to the team member’s point of view. 3. Get agreement on the problem. 4. Try to get the employee’s involvement in determining a solution. 5. Agree on a plan of action to improve performance. 6. Summarize the agreement and reinforce the changed behavior. 7. Plan for follow-up, if needed. © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. 11–16
  • Coaching Statements General  Your attendance is poor.  You need to cooperate better with department heads.  You need to follow our safety rules.  You haven’t made the progress that you’d agreed on. Pinpointed  You have missed a day in each of the past four pay periods.  Company policy is to give department heads the cost information when they request it.  This morning I saw you performing the job without wearing your safety goggles.  You and I agreed that you would complete the first draft by today, but you tell me you need two more days. © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. 11–17
  • “I” Messages • “I” Message  Is an appeal rather than a demand that the other person change.  Is focused on employee behavior, its effect, and how it makes the employee feel.  Frames the sender’s displeasure in a way that addresses the problem openly and tactfully and is more likely to pave the way toward a resolution in an objective, supportive manner. © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. 11–18
  • “I” Messages (cont’d) • Major Parts of an “I” Message  Feelings: Indicate how the sender feels about the effects of the behavior.  Angry, embarrassed, frustrated, concerned, etc.  Behavior: Identify the specific behavior.  Absenteeism, not keeping appointments, not meeting quota, etc.  Effect: Spell out the end result of the behavior.  Poor example for others, making the work unit look unproductive, inconvenience to others in the unit, etc. © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. 11–19
  • Examples of “You” and “I” Messages “You” Messages  You neglected to proofread that report, you should know better than to let a report go out like that.  You know I expect you to attend our regular meetings. You need to attend them from now on. © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. “I” Messages  When I noticed the many typos in the report, I was really upset. It makes our unit look careless and unprofessional.  When you don’t attend our regular meetings, I’m concerned that we miss your expertise and insight. 11–20
  • EXHIBIT 11.6 Iceberg Model of Counseling © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. 11–21
  • Coaching: The Counseling Function Physical and Emotional Physical and Emotional Illness Illness Job Performance Job Performance Areas of Areas of Employee Employee Counseling Counseling Personal Problems Personal Problems © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. 11–22
  • Role of EAPs in Counseling • Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs)  Professional counseling and medical services for employees with unresolved personal or work-related problems. • Issues in Counseling  Employee’s reluctance to “open up.”  Employee’s resentment of supervisor probing.  Possible supervisor/company liability for negative consequences for advice given to employee. © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. 11–23
  • EXHIBIT 11.7 Profile of Typical Substance Abusers • Four times more likely to have on-the-job accidents than nonabusers • Four to six times more likely to have off-the-job accidents than nonabusers • Five times the number of workers’ compensation claims as nonabusers • Five times the number of medical claims as nonabusers • Two and a half times more absenteeism/tardiness than nonabusers, especially on Mondays and Fridays and before and after holidays • Take extended breaks and lunch hours © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. Sources: Janet Gemignani, “Substance Abusers: Terminate or Treat?” Business & Health 17(6), June 1999, pp. 32–37; Laura A. Lyons and Brian H. Kleiner, “Managing the Problem of Substance Abuse . . . Without Abusing Employees,” HR Focus 69(4), April 1992, p. 9; Peter Ellis, “Substance Abuse and Work,” Occupational Safety & Health 30(13),March 2000, pp. 38– 41. 11–24
  • EXHIBIT 11.7 Profile of Typical Substance Abusers (cont’d) • Have numerous restroom breaks • Experience frequent off-job emergencies • Experience frequent short-term illnesses • Dramatic change in personality or work performance during the day, especially after breaks • Deteriorating personal appearance and ability to get along with others • Tendency to overreact to real or imagined criticism • Experience difficulty handling instructions • Depressed or anxious disposition • Work at 67 percent of potential © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. Sources: Janet Gemignani, “Substance Abusers: Terminate or Treat?” Business & Health 17(6), June 1999, pp. 32–37; Laura A. Lyons and Brian H. Kleiner, “Managing the Problem of Substance Abuse . . . Without Abusing Employees,” HR Focus 69(4), April 1992, p. 9; Peter Ellis, “Substance Abuse and Work,” Occupational Safety & Health 30(13),March 2000, pp. 38– 41. 11–25
  • EXHIBIT 11.8 Example of an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) • What the EAP is: • Voluntary • Independent • Confidential • Professional • Procedures for Use • Self-Referral • Supervisor/Management Referral • Free • Accessible • A Valuable Resource • What the EAP is Not: • A Branch of Human Resources • A Refuge for Poor Job Performance © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. Sources: Janet Gemignani, “Substance Abusers: Terminate or Treat?” Business & Health 17(6), June 1999, pp. 32–37; Laura A. Lyons and Brian H. Kleiner, “Managing the Problem of Substance Abuse . . . Without Abusing Employees,” HR Focus 69(4), April 1992, p. 9; Peter Ellis, “Substance Abuse and Work,” Occupational Safety & Health 30(13),March 2000, pp. 38– 41. 11–26
  • Important Terms Important Terms • • • • • • • • acknowledging affirming attending coaching confirming confronting/challenging counseling Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) © 2008 Thomson/SouthWestern. All rights reserved. • • • • • • • • • “I” message mentoring pinpointing probing reflecting resourcing reviewing summarizing tutoring 11–27