CC Overview for Roane State Faculty

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Webinar given on October 17, 2013 (1:00pmEDT / 10:00amPDT) to Roane State faculty and other TA program grantees as part of http://open4us.org.

I give a basic overview of Creative Commons, Creative Commons license use in education, and Creative Common’s integral role in the Open Educational Resources (OER) movement. I explain the Creative Commons Attribution license (CC BY) requirement for TAACCCT program grantees, how the CC BY license works, and the free support CC will offer to grantees around application of the license to grantee materials.

Link to recording: https://sas.elluminate.com/site/external/jwsdetect/nativeplayback.jnlp?sid=2008170&psid=2013-10-17.0955.M.5E7B928FC11E94D844B1405E5A750C.vcr

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CC Overview for Roane State Faculty

  1. 1. Webinar    Interface  Orienta.on   Talk  –     click  talk  bu:on  to  start  talking   click  it  again  to  relinquish   Raise  hand  to  stop  speaker  and  make   a  comment  or  ask  a  ques4on     List  of  par4cipants   Whiteboard   Chat   type  in  here  and  press  return  
  2. 2. Jane Park Project Manager at CC School of Open http://schoolofopen.org janepark@creativecommons.org
  3. 3. http://open4us.org 4
  4. 4. q  What is CC BY? q  What is Creative Commons? What does it do? How does it work? q  Who can use CC? q  How is CC used in education? q  What support can I expect from CC?
  5. 5. 1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  CC BY license requirement Creative Commons overview The CC licenses, esp. CC BY CC & Open Educational Resources Our free services
  6. 6. The CC BY license requirement “All successful applicants must allow broad access for others to use and enhance project products and offerings, including authorizing for-profit derivative uses of the courses and associated learning materials by licensing newly developed materials produced with grant funds with a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).” http://www.doleta.gov/taaccct/applicantinfo.cfm
  7. 7. The CC BY license requirement “This license allows subsequent users to copy, distribute, transmit and adapt the copyrighted work and requires such users to attribute the work in the manner specified by the Grantee.” http://www.doleta.gov/taaccct/applicantinfo.cfm
  8. 8. This requirement applies to: “Only work that is developed by the grantee with the grant funds is required to be licensed under the CC BY license.” http://www.doleta.gov/taaccct/applicantinfo.cfm
  9. 9. This requirement does not apply to: ü  Pre-existing copyrighted materials licensed to, or purchased by the grantee from third parties, including ü  Modifications of such materials ü  Works created by the grantee without grant funds
  10. 10. Why CC BY?
  11. 11. 1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  CC BY license requirement Creative Commons overview The CC licenses, esp. CC BY CC & Open Educational Resources Our free services
  12. 12. q  q  q  q  What is Creative Commons? What does it do? How does it work? Who can use CC?
  13. 13. What do we do? We make sharing content easy, legal, and scalable.
  14. 14. Technically, it’s so easy to share!
  15. 15. Legally? " Not so easy."
  16. 16. C All rights reserved
  17. 17. $750-$150,000 per copyright infringement"
  18. 18. 
 The problem: 
 
 Traditional © designed for old distribution models now governs the Internet"
  19. 19. With Creative Commons, creators can grant copy and reuse permissions in advance.
  20. 20. How do we do it? Free copyright licenses that creators can attach to their works.
  21. 21. Most free& least&free& Least free&
  22. 22. Step 1: Choose Conditions Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike No Derivative Works http://creativecommons.org/choose
  23. 23. Who can use CC licenses? Anyone. Anywhere in the world. Even machines can read CC licenses! Let me explain…
  24. 24. CC licenses are unique because they are expressed in three ways.
  25. 25. " " Lawyer Readable Legal Code
  26. 26. Human Readable Deed
  27. 27. Machine Readable Metadata
  28. 28. Optional fields
  29. 29. 4 1
  30. 30. 4 2
  31. 31. 74 jurisdictions"
  32. 32. 500 million works"
  33. 33. Who uses 
 Creative Commons?"
  34. 34. Wikipedia: Over 77,000 contributors working on over 22 million articles in 285 languages "
  35. 35. 1.  2.  3.  4.  CC BY license requirement Creative Commons overview The CC licenses, esp. CC BY CC & Open Educational Resources (OER) 5.  Our free services
  36. 36. Open Educational Resources (OER)!
  37. 37. ✓  Customization ✓  Accessible versions ✓  Translations ✓  Evolution of resource over time ✓  Affordable versions ✓  Innovation ✓  Discoverability
  38. 38. http://creativecommons.org/education
  39. 39. http://open4us.org/find-oer"
  40. 40. Why CC BY?
  41. 41. Why CC BY? ü Easy, Legal, Scalable ü Public access to publicly funded educational materials ü Making reuse and innovation possible
  42. 42. 1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  CC BY license requirement Creative Commons overview The CC licenses, esp. CC BY CC & Open Educational Resources Our free services
  43. 43. In addition to giving webinars… we will help you: ✓  Understand CC licenses ✓  Apply CC BY to your materials ✓  Find existing OER to use ✓  Attribute other CC-licensed works ✓  Follow best practices for above
  44. 44. We will do this through: ✓  Direct email & phone assistance taa@creativecommons.org ✓  More custom webinars ✓  On-site assistance ✓  http://open4us.org
  45. 45. http://open4us.org/faq"
  46. 46. Please attribute Creative Commons with a link to creativecommons.org Creative Commons and the double C in a circle are registered trademarks of Creative Commons in the United States and other countries. Third party marks and brands are the property of their respective holders.
  47. 47. Attributions" Photo: “fuzzy copyright”" Author: Nancy Sims" Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pugno_muliebriter/1384247192/ " License: CC BY-NC http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0 " " Photo: “Students in Jail”" Author: Judy Baxter" Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/judybaxter/501511984/in/photostream/" License: CC BY-NC-SA http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/ "
  48. 48. FAQ: Who do we put as the author of our materials (eg. consortium, college, faculty)?
  49. 49. Up to your consortium or college’s policy. Grant doesn’t stipulate.
  50. 50. FAQ: How do we credit the U.S. DOL as a funder of our materials?
  51. 51. See Section I.D.6 of the Round 2 SGA: Required Disclaimer for Grant Deliverables “The grantee must include the following language on all Work developed in whole or in part with grant funds…”
  52. 52. Required Disclaimer for Grant Deliverables (p. 9) “This product was funded by a grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration. The product was created by the grantee and does not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Labor. The Department of Labor makes no guarantees, warranties, or assurances of any kind, express or implied, with respect to such information, including any information on linked sites and including, but not limited to, accuracy of the information or its completeness, timeliness, usefulness, adequacy, continued availability, or ownership.”
  53. 53. This is separate from and has nothing to do with the CC BY license notice. You can include it in the same section where you usually add your disclaimers or notices.

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