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02 ms excel
02 ms excel
02 ms excel
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02 ms excel

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  • [ Notes to trainer: For detailed help in customizing this template, see the very last slide. Also, look for additional lesson text in the notes pane of some slides. Because this presentation contains a Macromedia Flash ® animation, saving the template may cause a warning message to appear regarding personal information. Unless you add information to the properties of the Flash file itself, this warning does not apply to this presentation. Click OK on the message.]
  • You'll learn about five great Excel features, including the new Compare Side by Side feature. Perhaps you'll be revisiting a few features that you've used before but have forgotten about.
  • In this lesson you'll learn how to keep titles in sight by freezing or locking them in place. That way, after you scroll past the first row or two, you won't have to guess what data refers to or keep scrolling back up the page to see the titles again. In the practice session you'll have a chance to freeze titles yourself. [ Note to trainer: Steps—presented in either numbered or bulleted lists—are always shown in yellow text.]
  • You freeze panes by making a selection in the worksheet, which you'll learn how to do in the next section, and then clicking Freeze Panes on the Window menu.
  • But there's a secret to success: To freeze titles, do not select the titles themselves.
  • If you don't get it right the first time, it's easy to unfreeze and try again. Just click Unfreeze Panes on the Window menu. Tip: You can freeze panes anywhere, not just below the first row or to the right of the first column. For example, if you wanted the information in the first three rows to stay in sight as you scrolled, you would select the fourth row and freeze.
  • [ Note to trainer: With Excel 2003 installed on your computer, you can click the link in the slide to go to an online practice. In the practice, you can work through each of these tasks in Excel, with instructions to guide you. Important: If you don’t have Excel 2003, you won’t be able to access the practice session.]
  • Both workbooks open in the same window. As you scroll in one worksheet, Excel automatically scrolls the same amount of cells in the second worksheet. Because you can see the same locations in both worksheets at the same time, it's no trouble at all to compare the differences between the two.
  • [Note to trainer: To play the animation when viewing the slide show, right-click the animation, then click Play . If you have problems viewing the animation, see the notes for the last slide in this presentation about playing a Macromedia Flash® animation. If you still have problems viewing the animation, slide 25 is a duplicate of this one with static art. Delete either slide 24 or slide 25 before using this presentation.]
  • [Note to trainer: This slide is identical to the previous one ( 24 ) except that it has static art instead of an animation. Use this slide if you have problems viewing the animation. Delete either slide 24 or slide 25 before using this presentation.]
  • Tips:     The worksheet at the top of the window is the one that's in view when you click the Side by Side command. You can navigate from either the top or bottom worksheet. Just click in the worksheet you want to navigate in to activate the scroll bars in that sheet. You can see data up close by zooming in on both worksheets at the same time by clicking Zoom on the View window.
  • [ Note to trainer: With Excel 2003 installed on your computer, you can click the link in the slide to go to an online practice. In the practice, you can work through each of these tasks in Excel, with instructions to guide you. Important: If you don’t have Excel 2003, you won’t be able to access the practice sessions.]
  • In this lesson you'll learn where to find Excel's super-fast automatic sums and more, such as calculating the average, minimum, or maximum value in a range of numbers.
  • Tip: The numbers you select don't have to be lined up together or in the same row or column. Add up numbers anywhere on the worksheet by pressing CTRL, and then selecting each number.
  • If you want to do even more, just click one of the other options on the shortcut menu, such as Max or Min to find the maximum or minimum in a range.
  • [ Note to trainer: With Excel 2003 installed on your computer, you can click the link in the slide to go to an online practice. In the practice, you can work through each of these tasks in Excel, with instructions to guide you. Important: If you don’t have Excel 2003, you won’t be able to access the practice sessions.]
  • In this lesson you'll learn how to use the fill handle to complete lists after you type one or two entries.
  • Tips:     For some lists, you need to type two entries to establish a pattern. For example, to fill in a series of numbers, such as 3, 6, 9, type two numbers, select both cells, and then drag the fill handle. You can also drag up or to the left as well as drag down or to the right. Ever need to type the same word many times, such as Complete in 10 consecutive rows? Just type the word once, and then drag the fill handle down rows or across columns to enter the same text without typing.
  • Tip: If a list isn't already available to import, you can type it directly in the Custom Lists dialog box. If you do, remember to press ENTER after each entry, or type them all in one line, but separate each entry with a comma.
  • [ Note to trainer: With Excel 2003 installed on your computer, you can click the link in the slide to go to an online practice. In the practice, you can work through each of these tasks in Excel, with instructions to guide you. Important: If you don’t have Excel 2003, you won’t be able to access the practice sessions.]
  • But once you know which boxes and buttons to pay attention to, it's a snap.
  • Now Excel knows that the condition that triggers bold red formatting is any value that is less than 15 in column C. See? It's a snap. Note: You can add up to three conditions to a cell or a given range of cells.
  • Then you can quickly tell when to hand out congratulations for good news or take steps to stop the damage when the news is bad.
  • [ Note to trainer: With Excel 2003 installed on your computer, you can click the link in the slide to go to an online practice. In the practice, you can work through each of these tasks in Excel, with instructions to guide you. Important: If you don’t have Excel 2003, you won’t be able to access the practice sessions.]
  • Using This Template This Microsoft ® PowerPoint ® template has training content about great features in Microsoft Office Excel ® 2003. It's geared for a corporate trainer to present to a group and customize as necessary. This template's content is adapted from the Microsoft Office Online Training course “Audio course: So that's how! Great Excel features.” Features of the template Title slide: On the very first slide, there are empty brackets over which you should type the name of your company. Or you can delete the text box altogether if you don't want this text. Animations: Custom animation effects are applied throughout. They'll play in previous versions back to Microsoft PowerPoint 2000. They include the entrance effects called Peek and Stretch , and sometimes the Dissolve effect is used. To alter them, go to the Slide Show menu, click Custom Animation , and work with the options that appear. If this presentation contains a Macromedia Flash ® animation: To play the Flash file, you must register an ActiveX control, called Shockwave Flash Object, on your computer. To do this, download the latest version of the Macromedia Flash Player from the Macromedia Web site. Slide transitions: The Wipe Down transition is applied throughout the show. If you want a different one, go to the Slide Show menu, click Slide Transition , and work with the options that appear. Hyperlinks to online course: The template contains links to the online version of this training course. The links take you to the hands-on practice session for each lesson and to the Quick Reference Card that is published for this course. Please take note: You must have Excel 2003 installed to view the hands-on practice sessions. Headers and footers: The template contains a footer that has the course title. You can change or remove the footers in the Header and Footer dialog box (which opens from the View menu).
  • Transcript

    • 1. Microsoft ® Office Excel ® 2003 Training Great Excel features Peace River Distributing presents:
    • 2. Course contents
      • Overview: Five great features
      • Lesson 1: Freeze!
      • Lesson 2: Compare side by side
      • Lesson 3: Sum it up, and more
      Great Excel features (Continued on next slide.)
    • 3. Course contents, cont’d.
      • Lesson 4: Type less, get more
      Great Excel features Each lesson includes a list of suggested tasks and a set of test questions.
      • Lesson 5: Call attention to the good or the bad
    • 4.
      • Isn't it great when something is easier than you thought? Like keeping titles in view when scrolling down a worksheet, or adding up numbers just by selecting them?
      Overview: Five great features Great Excel features In this course you’ll learn about five great Microsoft ® Office Excel ® 2003 features that will help you to work faster and easier.
    • 5. Course goals
      • Freeze the upper and left panes to keep column or row titles in view while you scroll through data.
      • Compare two workbooks at the same time by using the new Compare Side by Side feature in Microsoft Office Excel 2003.
      • Add up numbers just by selecting them.
      • Use the fill handle instead of typing to complete repetitive series of numbers, dates, or text.
      • Make formatting changes automatically when values are at a certain point by using conditional formatting.
      Great Excel features
    • 6. Lesson 1 Freeze!
    • 7. Freeze!
      • Imagine scrolling down the Excel worksheet in the picture. As you scroll, the column titles disappear. Then you wonder, do the numbers in column G refer to Units in Stock or Units on Order ?
      Great Excel features Column titles disappear upon scrolling.
    • 8. Freeze!
      • See the image at left.
      Great Excel features Column titles disappear upon scrolling.
      • Column titles in row 1.
      • Column titles disappear after scrolling down one or two rows.
    • 9. Divide and conquer
      • To keep titles in sight:
      Great Excel features Freeze titles in their own pane.
      • Divide or split the worksheet by freezing the titles in their own pane.
      • The title pane is then locked in place as you scroll through the rest of the worksheet.
    • 10. Divide and conquer
      • You can see the result in the picture. The titles, separated from the worksheet data by a horizontal line, are still visible over the top of row 10.
      Great Excel features Freeze titles in their own pane.
      • Click Freeze Panes on the Window menu.
      • Column titles are divided from the rest of the worksheet by a horizontal line.
    • 11. Freeze here
      • It's not just column titles that you can freeze in place. You can also freeze row titles, or you can freeze both at the same time to keep both column and row titles.
      Great Excel features Do not select titles to freeze panes
    • 12. Freeze here
      • To freeze:
      Great Excel features
      • Column titles, select the first row below the titles.
      • Row titles, select the first column to the right (for example, to keep supplier names in sight as you scroll across the worksheet).
      • Both column and row titles , click the cell that is both just below the column titles and just to the right of the row titles.
      Do not select titles to freeze panes
    • 13. Suggestions for practice
      • Freeze and unfreeze column titles.
      • Freeze and unfreeze row titles.
      • Freeze both column and row titles at the same time.
      • Keep titles in sight when you print.
      Great Excel features Online practice (requires Excel 2003)
    • 14. Test 1, question 1
      • The Freeze Panes command is on the Format menu. (Pick one answer.)
      Great Excel features
      • True.
      • False.
    • 15. Test 1, question 1: Answer
      • False.
      Great Excel features Select what you want to freeze, and then click Freeze Panes on the Window menu.
    • 16. Test 1, question 2
      • To freeze column titles, you would select: (Pick one answer.)
      Great Excel features
      • The row beneath the titles.
      • The second cell in the first row beneath the titles.
      • The first column.
    • 17. Test 1, question 2: Answer
      • The row beneath the titles.
      Great Excel features To freeze titles, select the row below, not the actual titles.
    • 18. Test 1, question 3
      • To freeze both column and row titles, you would select: (Pick one answer.)
      Great Excel features
      • The second column.
      • The third column.
      • The cell that is below the column titles and to the right of the row titles.
    • 19. Test 1, question 3: Answer
      • The cell that is below the column titles and to the right of the row titles.
      Great Excel features
    • 20. Lesson 2 Compare side by side
    • 21. Compare side by side
      • Have you ever wanted to compare the content in two different workbooks at the same time?
      • This lesson shows you how to use the new Compare Side by Side feature to compare budgets for two departments in two workbooks.
      Great Excel features Comparing two workbooks
    • 22. See both workbooks at the same time
      • Imagine that you have two workbooks. One is the budget for the Sales department and the other is the budget for the Marketing department.
      • You'd like to compare both workbooks to see the differences in projected expenses between the two departments.
      Great Excel features Compare two workbooks at the same time.
    • 23. See both workbooks at the same time
      • In the picture on the left, the Window menu shows that both workbooks are already open. Because Marketing is in view, the name of the second worksheet, Sales , is listed after the Side by Side command.
      • To see both workbooks at the same time, you click Compare Side by Side with Sales .
      Great Excel features Compare two workbooks at the same time.
    • 24. Scroll through workbooks at the same time
      • Worksheets from both workbooks will open, with one at the top of the window and the other in the bottom of the window.
      Great Excel features Animation: Right-click, and click Play . That's right, in Excel “side by side” means one on top of the other, but you can change the orientation from one on top of the other to one next to the other if you want.
    • 25.
      • Worksheets from both workbooks will open, with one at the top of the window and the other in the bottom of the window.
      Scroll through workbooks at the same time Great Excel features That's right, in Excel “side by side” means one on top of the other, but you can change the orientation from one on top of the other to one next to the other if you want.
    • 26. Scroll through workbooks at the same time
      • As you scroll through the first worksheet, the second worksheet scrolls right along, keeping pace with you and making it easy to compare the differences between the two department budgets.
      Great Excel features
    • 27. Suggestions for practice
      • Compare two workbooks at the same time.
      • Change side by side orientation.
      • Close the side by side view.
      Great Excel features Online practice (requires Excel 2003)
    • 28. Test 2, question 1
      • Where is the Compare Side by Side command located? (Pick one answer.)
      Great Excel features
      • On the Window menu.
      • On the Data menu.
      • On the View menu.
    • 29. Test 2, question 1: Answer
      • On the Window menu.
      Great Excel features You can see two workbooks clearly now.
    • 30. Test 2, question 2
      • What does side by side mean in Excel? (Pick one answer.)
      Great Excel features
      • One next to the other.
      • Facing the music together.
      • One on top of the other.
    • 31. Test 2, question 2: Answer
      • One on top of the other.
      Great Excel features That's how Excel sees it.
    • 32. Test 2, question 3
      • You can navigate only from the top worksheet. (Pick one answer.)
      Great Excel features
      • True.
      • False.
    • 33. Test 2, question 3: Answer
      • False.
      Great Excel features You can navigate from either the top or bottom worksheet. Click in the worksheet you want to navigate in to activate the scroll bars in that sheet.
    • 34. Lesson 3 Sum it up, and more
    • 35. Sum it up, and more
      • Quick: What's the sum of the selected numbers in the picture? Even if you're very fast at doing math in your head, Excel can probably get the answer before you do.
      Great Excel features What's the total of the selected numbers?
    • 36. And the total is
      • All you have to do is...wait, the total is already in the status bar at the bottom of the window: Sum=$235.35 .
      Great Excel features As you select the numbers, Excel automatically adds them up and displays the total in the status bar.
    • 37. And the total is
      • See the image at left.
      Great Excel features
      • Selected numbers.
      • Total in the status bar at the bottom of the window.
    • 38. Want more?
      • Need an average? Select the numbers, and right-click the status bar.
      Great Excel features
      • Click Average on the shortcut menu, which gives you the arithmetic mean.
      • The answer in the status bar changes from a sum to Average=$39.23 .
    • 39. Suggestions for practice
      • Select numbers and see the sum.
      • Add numbers that are not consecutive.
      • Do more than sum.
      Great Excel features Online practice (requires Excel 2003)
    • 40. Test 3, question 1
      • How do you select numbers to add up that are scattered in different rows or columns? (Pick one answer.)
      Great Excel features
      • Press and hold down CTRL while you select each number.
      • Press and hold down SHIFT while you select each number.
      • Press and hold down CTRL+SHIFT while you select each number.
    • 41. Test 3, question 1: Answer
      • Press and hold down CTRL while you select each number.
      Great Excel features
    • 42. Test 3, question 2
      • How do you change the result from Sum to Average? (Pick one answer.)
      Great Excel features
      • Click Validation on the Data menu.
      • Right-click the status bar.
      • Click Formula Auditing on the Tools menu.
    • 43. Test 3, question 2: Answer
      • Right-click the status bar.
      Great Excel features
    • 44. Test 3, question 3
      • If you do not see the sum in the status bar, click Status Bar on the _____ menu to turn the feature on. (Pick one answer.)
      Great Excel features
      • Edit
      • Tools
      • View
    • 45. Test 3, question 3: Answer
      • View.
      Great Excel features That's where you'll find the Status Bar command.
    • 46. Lesson 4 Type less, get more
    • 47. Type less, get more
      • Tired of typing the same lists over and over again, or copying and pasting lists from one place to another?
      • Then stop. Instead, let Excel fill in the months of the year, days of the week, and even your company's sales regions or employee names.
      Great Excel features Don't type the same lists over and over again.
    • 48. Fill it up
      • Imagine that you're typing the first six months of the year for the umpteenth time. Only this time you'll do it the easy way:
      Great Excel features Drag the fill handle to fill in the list.
      • Type "January" so that Excel knows what you want.
      • Select the January cell, and then position the mouse pointer over the lower-right corner of the cell until the black cross (+) appears.
    • 49. Fill it up
      • Imagine that you're typing the first six months of the year for the umpteenth time. Only this time you'll do it the easy way:
      Great Excel features
      • Drag the fill handle over the range you want to fill. As you drag, the ScreenTip tells you what will be filled in.
      Drag the fill handle to fill in the list.
      • Release the mouse button to fill in the series.
    • 50. Make your own list for Excel to complete
      • Excel has all sorts of lists you can complete with the fill handle: 1, 2, 3; Mon, Tues; 9:00, 10:00; Quarter 1, Quarter 2; or 15-Jan, 15-Feb.
      • But Excel can also fill in custom lists that you create, such as a list of employees at your company.
      Great Excel features Fill in a list instead of typing the list.
    • 51. Make your own list for Excel to complete
      • Enter the employee names once.
      Great Excel features
      • Select the names.
      • In the Options dialog box on the Tools menu, open Custom Lists .
      • Click Import .
      Fill in a list instead of typing the list. The next time you need to enter the list, type the first name, and then use the fill handle to complete the list.
    • 52. Suggestions for practice
      • Fill in the months of the year.
      • Fill in a list of numbers.
      • Make a new list for Excel to complete.
      • Use the fill handle to enter the same text more than once.
      Great Excel features Online practice (requires Excel 2003)
    • 53. Test 4, question 1
      • To use the fill handle, first select the cell, and then position the pointer over the lower-right corner of the cell until: (Pick one answer.)
      Great Excel features
      • A white cross appears.
      • The black cross (+) appears.
      • A ScreenTip tells you to drag the fill handle.
    • 54. Test 4, question 1: Answer
      • The black cross (+) appears.
      Great Excel features
    • 55. Test 4, question 2
      • You can fill up or to the left as well as down or to the right. (Pick one answer.)
      Great Excel features
      • True.
      • False.
    • 56. Test 4, question 2: Answer
      • True.
      Great Excel features You can fill in more than one direction.
    • 57. Test 4, question 3
      • After you create a custom list of your employee names, how do you enter the entire list? (Pick one answer.)
      Great Excel features
      • Type the first name on the list, and then use the fill handle to complete it.
      • Click Custom Lists on the Tools menu.
      • Click Sort on the Data menu.
    • 58. Test 4, question 3: Answer
      • Type the first name on the list, and then use the fill handle to complete it.
      Great Excel features That's the easy (and best) way to fill a list.
    • 59. Test 4, question 4
      • You can use the fill handle to enter the exact same text more than once. (Pick one answer.)
      Great Excel features
      • True.
      • False.
    • 60. Test 4, question 4: Answer
      • True.
      Great Excel features
    • 61. Lesson 5 Call attention to the good or the bad
    • 62. Call attention to the good or the bad
      • Have you ever found it hard to spot the data you're looking for because you couldn't see the forest for the trees?
      • In this lesson you'll learn how to use conditional formatting to make certain values jump out at you when the conditions are right. Then you can quickly see what you're looking for.
      Great Excel features Conditional formatting
    • 63. Get ready
      • Imagine you want book sales under 15 copies to be formatted in bold red to really make underachieving sales stand out.
      • It's probably easy for you to spot the sale under 15 in the picture.
      Great Excel features The Conditional Formatting command
    • 64. Get ready
      • Select column C (which contains the book sales numbers).
      • Click Conditional Formatting on the Format menu.
      Great Excel features The Conditional Formatting command But if this workbook had lots of other rows, the other under-15 entries could get lost in the rest of the data:
    • 65. State your conditions
      • The Conditional Formatting dialog box is big, with enough boxes and buttons to be intimidating, because it's built to take in a lot of possible conditions.
      Great Excel features The Conditional Formatting dialog box.
    • 66. State your conditions Great Excel features The Conditional Formatting dialog box.
      • First, choose the cell value conditions to trigger the conditional formatting by selecting less than , and typing 15 .
      • Then, click the Format button to pick bold red format for any values less than 15.
    • 67. See the results
      • The bold red stands out, highlighting every number that is less than 15.
      • Whether it's good or bad, rising or falling sales figures, or anything else you want to be sure to notice, call attention to cell values by using conditional formatting.
      Great Excel features Bold red formatting stands out.
    • 68. Suggestions for practice
      • Make text turn red under the right condition.
      • Add another condition.
      • Get rid of conditional formatting.
      Great Excel features Online practice (requires Excel 2003)
    • 69. Test 5, question 1
      • The first conditional formatting step is to select data before setting up your conditions. (Pick one answer.)
      Great Excel features
      • True.
      • False.
    • 70. Test 5, question 1: Answer
      • True.
      Great Excel features This is an important step that's easy to forget. For example, if the data that you want to apply conditional formatting to is in column C, select the cells in column C before you start.
    • 71. Test 5, question 2
      • Where is the Conditional Formatting command located? (Pick one answer.)
      Great Excel features
      • On the Format menu.
      • On the View menu.
      • On the Tools menu.
    • 72. Test 5, question 2: Answer
      • On the Format menu.
      Great Excel features
    • 73. Test 5, question 3
      • You can use up to two conditions in a cell or a given range of cells. (Pick one answer.)
      Great Excel features
      • True.
      • False.
    • 74. Test 5, question 3: Answer
      • False.
      Great Excel features Click the Add button in the Conditional Formatting dialog box to add up to two additional conditions to the original conditional formatting.
    • 75. Test 3, question 4
      • To get rid of conditional formatting, select the column it is in, and then: (Pick one answer.)
      Great Excel features
      • On the Format menu, click Conditional Formatting .
      • Right-click, and then select Conditional Formatting .
      • Right-click, and then select Delete Conditional Formatting .
    • 76. Test 3, question 4: Answer
      • On the Format menu, click Conditional Formatting .
      Great Excel features Then click Delete , and select the check boxes for the conditions you want to delete.
    • 77. Quick Reference Card
      • For a summary of the tasks covered in this course, view the Quick Reference Card .
      Great Excel features
    • 78. USING THIS TEMPLATE See the notes pane or view the full notes page (View menu) for detailed help on this template.

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