Implementing Open Access: Effective Management of Your Research Data
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The slides from my session with the DCC's Martin Donnelly at the Understanding ModernGov "Implementing Open Access" event in June 2014. Our talk is all about the support available from Jisc and the ...

The slides from my session with the DCC's Martin Donnelly at the Understanding ModernGov "Implementing Open Access" event in June 2014. Our talk is all about the support available from Jisc and the DCC to help you manage your research data, and potential future initiatives that might help institutions to handle the move to "open science".

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  • CARDIO can be used in conjunction with the Data Asset Framework to identify ‘the what’ as well as ‘the how’
  • Difference between these two charts is institutions which returned multiple responses.

Implementing Open Access: Effective Management of Your Research Data Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Martin Hamilton, Martin Donnelly Implementing Open Access conference, June 2014 Effective Management of your Research Data
  • 2. Outline » 1. Background » 2. Jisc Co-Design challenge: Research at Risk » 3. RDM support from the DCC – Capability studies – Data management planning – Training and development » 4. UK HEI survey » 5. Feedback and futures
  • 3. Outline » 1. Background » 2. Jisc Co-Design challenge: Research at Risk » 3. RDM support from the DCC – Capability studies – Data management planning – Training and development » 4. UK HEI survey » 5. Feedback and futures
  • 4. Background: About Jisc » Registered charity championing the use of digital technologies in research and education » Wide range of shared services for UK Universities and Colleges, e.g. - JANET, world leading NREN - Groundbreaking content deals with publishers - Cloud brokerage, e.g. Amazon portal » R&D achievements such as: - IETF standards track Moonshot project - Pioneering work in Open Educational Resources, Open Access and Open Data
  • 5. Background: About the DCC The (est. 2004) is… » UK centre of expertise in digital preservation, with a particular focus on research data management (RDM) » Based across three sites: Universities of Edinburgh, Glasgow and Bath » Working with a number of UK universities to identify gaps in RDM provision and raise capabilities across the sector » Also involved in a variety of international collaborations
  • 6. Research Data Management (RDM) is: » An integral part of doing quality research in the 21st century » Increasingly expected / mandated by funders, publishers and others » An opportunity for new discoveries and different approaches to research » A safeguard against inappropriate data disclosure » An activity that requires careful planning and consideration, and – ideally – coordination and support across many stakeholder types Background: Why RDM?
  • 7. Background: Policy drivers » Seven “Common Principles on Data Policy” – Data as a public good; Preservation; Discovery; Confidentiality; Right of first use; Recognition; Public funding for RDM » Six of the seven RCUK funders require data management plans, or equivalent, at the application stage » The other (EPSRC) requires nothing less than an institutional data infrastructure (by May 2015).We expect that DMP will be a key component in many cases…
  • 8. Background: Horizon 2020 » From 2014, Data Management Plans are required for ‘key areas’ of the Horizon 2020 programme, covered by the Open Data Pilot.These include several technology- oriented strands and others addressing ‘societal challenges’ – we are expecting compliance requirements to be further detailed via specific calls. » Guidelines on Open Access to Scientific Publications and Research Data in Horizon 2020 (pp. 8- 11):http://ec.europa.eu/research/participants/data/ref/h2020/grants_manual/hi/ oa_pilot/h2020-hi-oa-pilot-guide_en.pdf » These guidelines echo the G8 Science Ministers’ statement (2013), which offered similar good practice principles: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/g8-science-ministers-statement
  • 9. Background: Collaborations » Liaison :UK HEIs and research institutes – e.g. DBIS, HEFCE, libraries, IT directors, RCUK , publishers etc » Research Sector Transparency Board, RCUK National E-Infrastructure Group & E-Infrastructure Leadership Council » Work with international initiatives: › Research Data Alliance, CODATA, EuroCRIS, ANDS › Knowledge Exchange – at the moment through the KE we are exploring incentives to sharing & funding models for research data infrastructure » European projects: SIM4RDM & 4Cs » Jisc CASRAI - UK pilot :development of related vocabularies and standards, for example data management plans vocabularies
  • 10. Data Clouod Librarians, research managers & IT have three interlocking suites of services, to support researcher needs and institutional policies Researchers have a cohesive and interlocking suite of research data management, publication and discovery services Research Data Management and Planning Services Research Data Storage and Archival Services Research Data Discovery Services UKDA, BADC Research Data Management Applications ICSU /WDSEBI / GenBank Research Data Management Applications Journal Policies Registry Research Data Registry / Cross Repository Discovery Service Key Established service Project Other supported JISC supported DMPonline DMP Registry Research Data Management and Discovery Services for the Research Data Lifecycle SWORD + Disciplinary Data Repositories (National and International) Institutional Data CataloguesInstitutional Data Catalogues Disciplinary Research Data Discovery Services Metadata Exchange Between Journals, Archives, Repositories Researcher identifiers Organisation identifiers RegistriesData Identifiers Data Identifiers and Metadata Schema Support for Research Data Lifecycle Cloud/Storage There is a set of infrastructure components that underpin all three suites
  • 11. Outline » 1. Background » 2. Jisc Co-Design challenge: Research at Risk » 3. RDM support from the DCC – Capability studies – Data management planning – Training and development » 4. UK HEI survey » 5. Community feedback
  • 12. Background: The co-design process
  • 13. Outline » 1. Background » 2. Jisc Co-Design challenge: Research at Risk » 3. RDM support from the DCC – Capability studies – Data management planning – Training and development » 4. UK HEI survey » 5. Community feedback
  • 14. Support from DCC: Helping institutions http://blog.soton.ac.uk/keepi t/2010/01/28/aida-and- institutional-wobbliness/ » Three principal areas for HEIs to focus on: › Developing and integrating their technical infrastructure (storage space, repositories/ CRIS systems, data catalogues, etc) › Developing human infrastructure (creating policies, assessing current data management capabilities, identifying areas of good practice, data management plan templates, tailoring training and guidance materials…) › Developing business plans for sustainable services / roles
  • 15. Support from DCC: Institutional engagement
  • 16. Support from DCC: Prioritising effort » RDM is a complex and hybrid issue, involving a heterogeneous mix of stakeholder groups » It can’t all be tackled at once, but rather should be planned out carefully and broken down into achievable goals » Working with universities, we’ve carried out funder analyses, which in turn inform strategy and policy development » Capability / maturity studies using CARDIO tool (about which more in a moment) » Fact-finding exercises can also help to identify – and subsequently leverage – existing pockets of good practice and/or enthusiasm
  • 17. Support from DCC: CARDIO » CARDIO: CollaborativeAssessment of Research Data Infrastructures and Objectives › A methodology and tool to assess research data infrastructure and support › It uses the concept of maturity, asking different stakeholders to rate provision on a 1-5 scale › CARDIO is collaborative – the aim is to get multiple viewpoints to identify discrepancies and reach consensus › http://cardio.dcc.ac.uk/
  • 18. Support from DCC: CARDIO » RDM maturity › Assess a ‘data context’ – a place where data is created and managed (e.g. department, school, project, funding stream, institution...) › How well can it/does it manage its data? › That’s dependent on: – Finances – Technology – Policy and procedures – Organisational will – Skills…
  • 19. Support from DCC: Data Mgt Planning Analysed requirements Developed a Checklist Provided tools & guidance Analysis of funder policies (2009) DMPonline tool (2010) How-To guide (2011)https://dmponline.dcc.ac.uk/
  • 20. Support from DCC: DMP Checklist » Checklist for a Data Management Plan v4.0 (2013) www.dcc.ac.uk/resources/data- management-plans DMP SECTIONS 1. Administrative Data, e.g. project name, description, PI, funder, etc 2. Data Collection, e.g. description, capture methods, etc 3. Documentation and Metadata, e.g. what information is needed for the data to be to be accessed and understood in the future? 4. Ethics and Legal Compliance, e.g. consent, sensitivity, copyright/IPR 5. Storage and Backup, e.g. where will data be held and backed up? Security and access issues 6. Selection and Preservation, e.g. keep it all or just some? How long should it be kept? 7. Data Sharing, e.g. how will data be found and accessed, any restrictions? 8. Responsibilities and Resources, e.g. who will do it and who will pay?
  • 21. Support from DCC: DMPonline » A free Web-based, Open Source data management planning tool incorporating templates and guidance: https://dmponline.dcc.ac.uk/ › v1 (April 2010) › v2 (March 2011) added scope for multiple versions of plans and templates › v3 (May 2012) added functionality for sharing plans › v4 (November 2013) changed relationship with Checklist, improved usability » Technologies involved: Ruby on Rails, JavaScript, MySQL database
  • 22. Support from DCC:Training / community dev. » We’ve run many awareness-raising and advocacy events and workshops for staff and students » These can be general, or focused on particular elements of the data management ecosystem (for example, data management planning) » We also facilitate internal working groups, which often bring together groups of colleagues not used to collaborating with each other » We’ve recently been asked to provide training for EPSRC’s doctoral training centres – detailsTBC at this stage » Lastly, we organise community events, such as the biannual Research Data Management Forum (most recent event was last week, onWorkflows and Lifecycle Models)
  • 23. Outline » 1. Background » 2. Jisc Co-Design challenge: Research at Risk » 3. RDM support from the DCC – Capability studies – Data management planning – Training and development » 4. UK HEI survey » 5. Feedback and futures
  • 24. UK HEI Survey »2014 Survey of UK Higher Education Institutions › Driven byT-1 year for EPSRC expectations › National picture of institutional progress › Understand barriers, gaps in support needs › 20 questions – online survey link emailed › To Pro-VC’s for Research & Service Heads › Library, IT, Research Support & Commercialisation › Institutions with at least 10% income from research
  • 25. UK HEI Survey: Who participated? Respondents Russell Group (39) Others 10%+ (35) Others (13) From 61 institutions
  • 26. UK HEI Survey: Demographics 31% 38% 14% 17% Research Support & Commercialisation Library or Information Service IT/ Research computing Others
  • 27. UK HEI Survey: Institutional Drivers 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 UK Research Council data policies Government policy on open data Governance of research integrity… Strategy to expand support for… EU Horizon2020 policy on data… 92 57 54 54 53 % Agreeing
  • 28. UK HEI Survey: Areas with most progress 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Policy development Data Management & Sharing Plans RDM skills training & consultancy % indicating piloting or live
  • 29. UK HEI Survey: Getting there? 32 34 36 38 40 42 Access & storage systems Data cataloguing & publishing Managing implementation as… % indicating piloting or live
  • 30. UK HEI Survey: Areas of least progress 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Business planning & sustainability Digital preservation & continuity planning Governance of data access & reuse % indicating piloting or live
  • 31. UK HEI Survey: Obstacles Lack of appropriate staff… Availability of funding Low priority for researchers 71 64 59 % citing
  • 32. Issues needing External Support? Defining what to retain and for how long Specifying tools/ infrastructure Supporting metadata creation for research data discovery Identifying which costs may be recovered from grants Advocacy to senior management Developing data catalogues and registers
  • 33. Outline » 1. Background » 2. Jisc Co-Design challenge: Research at Risk » 3. RDM support from the DCC – Capability studies – Data management planning – Training and development » 4. UK HEI survey » 5. Feedback and futures
  • 34. Feedback and futures - Active storage is not compliance, evidence of HEIs repeating the same patterns & interpreting compliance differently. - Creating compelling services that will appeal to researchers. - Getting researchers to engage ; researchers /PI think of it as their data. - Building trust in across the parts of the HEI that are involved. - Political issues and disciplinary differences. - Misconceptions – not all data is open – need to be clear and ensure this is understood. - Tools that take you through the whole journey. - New shared services and brokered agreements, to avoid 150 HEIs coming up with own solutions!
  • 35. Feedback and futures - Active storage is not compliance, evidence of HEIs repeating the same patterns & interpreting compliance differently. - Creating compelling services that will appeal to researchers. - Getting researchers to engage ; researchers /PI think of it as their data. - Building trust in across the parts of the HEI that are involved. - Political issues and disciplinary differences. - Misconceptions – not all data is open – need to be clear and ensure this is understood. - Tools that take you through the whole journey. - New shared services and brokered agreements, to avoid 150 HEIs coming up with own solutions!
  • 36. Feedback and futures
  • 37. m.hamilton@jisc.ac.uk, martin.donnelly@ed.ac.uk (with thanks to DCC colleagues for some slides) Implementing Open Access conference, June 2014 Effective Management of your Research Data