Teaching Philosophy Openly: why/not?
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Teaching Philosophy Openly: why/not?

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A presentation on open education and philosophy given at the biannual meeting of the American Association of Philosophy Teachers, College of St. Benedict and St. John's University, July-Aug. 2014. ...

A presentation on open education and philosophy given at the biannual meeting of the American Association of Philosophy Teachers, College of St. Benedict and St. John's University, July-Aug. 2014.

In it I ask people to discuss just what "open education" might be, give some examples of it, and ask for discussion of potential benefits/drawbacks/obstacles to engaging in open educational activities.

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  • OPEN PEER REVIEW <br /> Open Peer Review is a form of Peer Review, where readers have the right to consult the commentaries by peers in the scientific validation process. <br /> Open peer review consists of signed reviews that can be posted on the Internet. This transparency aims to resolve some of the drawbacks of anonymous reviewers in the normal peer review process. <br /> Peer Commentary refers to the added possibility to add comments. <br /> OPEN BUSINESS: conducting business in a way similar to open source: giving away some products, allowing for remixing of some, etc. How to still make money? <br /> <br /> Sell physical complements <br /> Bands who develop a fan base by giving away their music online can rely on this fan base to consume physical compliments to their music, by attending gigs or purchasing products such as T-shirts, caps and badges. <br /> <br /> Sell information complements <br /> In open source software products, such as Red Hat Linux, are given away, and then support contracts are sold on the strength of the free product. A type of “support contract” for music might be specially packaged forms of the music, already generated by the artists during the production stages, where the different recording tracks have been separated out to allow users to remix the song. <br /> In the same way, an academic, consultant or journalist distributing their writing free online could successfully charge for specific consultancy work based on the popularity or reach of their work. Developing ones reputation for free is a good strategy to create derivative revenue streams. <br /> <br /> Subscriptions <br /> The disadvantages of hiding content behind subscription barriers have already been discussed. However, this does not preclude the content producers from allowing access to special features associated with the content to paying subscribers. Slashdot, for example, gives subscribers access to their posts half an hour before they are posted to all readers, enabling subscribers to be first in line to comment on a particular post. Increasingly adaptations to old revenue models can be found where more is available for free, but revenue comes from parallel revenue streams, which are only available to paying customers. The difference being they increasingly are not paying for what used to be the main product, but for ancillary higher value services. <br /> <br /> Offer a personalised version <br /> Personalising content, using customer relations management software such as that employed at Amazon, can help users navigate your content by reminding them what they have and haven’t seen, as well as recommending they look at something based on what other users with similar profiles have enjoyed looking at. <br /> <br /> <br /> Wiki educator on defining OER http://wikieducator.org/Educators_care/Defining_OER <br /> <br /> <br /> Option 1 <br /> Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use or re-purposing by others. Open educational resources include full courses, course materials, modules, textbooks, streaming videos, tests, software, and any other tools, materials, or techniques used to support access to knowledge (Atkins, Brown, & Hammond 2007[1]). <br /> Option 2 <br /> Open Educational Resources (OER) are materials used to support education that may be freely accessed, reused, modified and shared by anyone (Downes 2011[2]). <br /> <br /> Option 3 <br /> Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching, learning, and research materials in any medium that reside in the public domain or have been released under an open license that permits their free use and re-purposing by others (Creative Commons[3]). <br /> <br /> <br /> UNESCO on OER http://www.unesco.org/new/en/communication-and-information/access-to-knowledge/open-educational-resources/ <br /> <br /> “Open Educational Resources are teaching, learning or research materials that are in the public domain or released with an intellectual property license that allows for free use, adaptation, and distribution. “ <br /> <br /> OER link is to JISC guide to OER: http://www.jisc.ac.uk/publications/programmerelated/2013/Openeducationalresources <br /> <br /> “Open educational resources (OER) are learning and teaching materials, freely available online for anyone to use. Examples include full courses, course modules, lectures, games, teaching materials and assignments. They can take the form of text, images, audio, video and may even be interactive.” <br /> <br /> “Once released, the resources can be used by a learner, reused by a teacher, remixed with other resources or repurposed to create new educational materials. While it is not essential to embrace all aspects – release, use, reuse and repurposing – involvement with one aspect tends to lead naturally to another.” <br /> <br /> “Releasing open educational resources is not simply about putting learning and teaching material online; it involves making the material available in a genuinely open way. Creative Commons or similar licenses are used so that the creator of the resources can retain copyright, while others can copy, distribute, and make some uses of their work.” <br /> <br />
  • Wiley’s 4 Rs http://is.gd/uEC3hj <br /> Revise—adapt and improve the OER so it better meets your needs. <br /> Remix—combine or "mash up" the OER with other OER to produce new materials. <br /> Reuse—use the original or your new version of the OER in a wide range of contexts. <br /> Redistribute—make copies and share the original OER or your new version with others. <br /> <br /> 5th R: students often no longer have access to what they have purchased, such as textbooks, after term ends (if digital, e.g.), or can’t mark them up. Don’t really own them, just borrowing for a time—disappearing ink. Can only access during a course and then disappear.
  • Wiley’s 4 Rs http://is.gd/uEC3hj <br /> Revise—adapt and improve the OER so it better meets your needs. <br /> Remix—combine or "mash up" the OER with other OER to produce new materials. <br /> Reuse—use the original or your new version of the OER in a wide range of contexts. <br /> Redistribute—make copies and share the original OER or your new version with others. <br /> <br /> 5th R: students often no longer have access to what they have purchased, such as textbooks, after term ends (if digital, e.g.), or can’t mark them up. Don’t really own them, just borrowing for a time—disappearing ink. Can only access during a course and then disappear.

Teaching Philosophy Openly: why/not? Teaching Philosophy Openly: why/not? Presentation Transcript

  • DOING PHILOSOPHY IN THE OPEN: WHY/NOT? Christina Hendricks, Univ. of British Columbia American Association of Philosophy Teachers Meeting August 1, 2014 Slides available here: http://is.gd/openphilslides Presentation licensed CC-BY 4.0: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
  • Learning Objectives By the end of the session, you should be able to • State and explain several ways that one can engage in open education (without creating an entire MOOC) • List benefits and possible drawbacks to at least two open educational activities • Explain whether you might engage in any open ed activities in future, and if so, what/why
  • Openness generally • Open source (software) • Open access • Open peer review • Open data • Open government • Open business • Open education, open educational resources (OER) See, e.g. http://p2pfoundation.net/Openness View slide
  • Open access vs more “open” Open access: free to view/read, sometimes to download and print and redistribute “Open like a museum” A Day at the Museum 2, Flickr photo shared by Robert Couse- Baker, licensed CC-BY 2.0 View slide
  • Open access vs more “open” • The four “R’s” of open content, acc to David Wiley http://is.gd/uEC3hj • Reuse • Revise • Remix • Redistribute • [A new 5th R] Retain right to make, own, control copies (e.g., download, duplicate, store, manage) [indefinitely] http://is.gd/5DHqCn
  • Group discussion Please discuss in groups: 1. Given what’s been said so far, what sorts of activities do you think might fall under “open education”? 2. Do you engage in any of these yourself or know someone who does? If possible, please type in your answers under your group’s heading on this Google doc: http://is.gd/openphilgrps
  • Survey answers I did a small survey in May 2014 asking people what open education is, benefits & potential drawbacks/obstacles. Results: http://is.gd/openedsurvey
  • Open Edu examples Campus courses open to anyone to follow/join: • Social Media & Open Ed grad course at U of Regina (Saskatchewan): http://eci831.ca/ • Arts One Open (U of British Columbia, Vancouver): http://artsone-open.arts.ubc.ca • Open Online High School Phil course in BC, Canada: http://talonsphilosophy.wordpress.com/
  • Open Edu examples Making course materials freely available & reusable • Some institutions make entire courses available, e.g. • MIT Open courseware • Carnegie Mellon Open Learning Initiative • Search open courses by OEConsortium • Some faculty members make materials available on websites (mine: here and here) • Can search or contribute to OER repositories, e.g., MERLOT, Solvonauts, OER Commons
  • Creative Commons Licenses Ways to indicate to others how they can use your materials w/o asking permission • https://creativecommons.org/lic enses/ • Nice video explaining CC & different licenses: http://creativecommons.org/vide os/creative-commons-kiwi
  • Benefits/drawbacks/obstacles In your group, choose two or more open educational activities from Gdoc: http://is.gd/openphilgrps Please discuss, & write on doc if you can: • Any possible benefits you can see from engaging in these open ed activities • Potential drawbacks or obstacles to people doing so • Whether you might consider doing any of these yourself & why/why not
  • Thank you! Reminder: These slides are available to view, download, remix, reuse here: http://is.gd/openphilslides Christina Hendricks http://blogs.ubc.ca/christinahendricks (website) http://blogs.ubc.ca/chendricks (blog) Twitter: @clhendricksbc