Academic Web 2.0: An Introduction to Social and Participatory Media
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Academic Web 2.0: An Introduction to Social and Participatory Media

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Training presentation for the Commonwealth Scholars (Midlands and Oxford) Conference, ESGC, University of Nottingham, 27 March 2012.

Training presentation for the Commonwealth Scholars (Midlands and Oxford) Conference, ESGC, University of Nottingham, 27 March 2012.

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  • 1. Andy CoverdaleAcademic Web 2.0An Introduction to Social and Participatory MediaCommonwealth Scholars ConferenceEngineering & Science Graduate CentreUniversity of Nottingham27 March 2012
  • 2. • Share work and ideas• Network• Engage with specialist or wider audiences• Gain recognition in research field• Develop academic profile• Engage in dialogue• Get critical feedback• Conceptualise / synthesise ideas• Source, manage and share resources• Develop new skills• Gain confidence• Create evidence of research impact
  • 3. The Social WebSocial & Participatory Media• Blogging• Microblogging (Twitter)• Social Networking Sites (SNS)• Social Bookmarking & Citation• Ning Sites• Content Sharing Sites• Collaborative Texts & Wikis• Social Annotation• Virtual Worlds
  • 4. Academic Practices Source, Manage & Networking Share ResourcesCollaborative Dissemination Working
  • 5. Academic Practices Source, RSS READER FACEBOOK Manage & Networking Share TWITTER Resources SOCIAL BOOKMARKING FACEBOOK GROUPS NING SITES BLOGS WIKISCollaborative Dissemination Working GOOGLE DOCS
  • 6. Tools and Spaces
  • 7. BloggingBlogs• e.g. Wordpress http://wordpress.org• e.g. Blogger http://www.blogger.com‘Tumblogs’• e.g. Tumblr http://www.tumblr.com• e.g. Posterous https://posterous.comHosting• Developer-hosted• Self-hostedTechnologies• Increasingly multimedia – links, tags, RSS feeds, images & video• New forms of blogging – e.g. audio & video blogging
  • 8. Blogging: Blog WritingWriting Skills• Regularity – writing discipline• Informality – opportunities to experiment with different writing styles• Generality – writing to a wider audienceWriting Contexts• Shape ideas, formulate thoughts, and concepts• Work in progress – raw content for thesis, journal article or conference paper• Subjective and biographical – emphasis on personal perspective, opinion and experience
  • 9. Blogging: Impact and Peer ReviewThe ‘Blogosphere’• Blogging community – reading, linking to, and commenting on other blogs• Comments and pingbacks – feedback and peer reviewInformal, Distributed and Frequent• Establish sustainable channels of discussion, feedback and peer support• Extend beyond immediate research community – geographically and disciplinary
  • 10. Blogging: Process and ReflectionNarrative• Journal style entry provides narrative structure (e.g. doctoral experience)Reflective and Evidential• Demonstration and documentation of processNavigation• Searchable facility• Chronological (time-based) – by date, month, year• Conceptual (ideas-based) – by category or tags
  • 11. TwitterFeatures• Microcontent – ‘tweets’ (maximum 140 characters)• Following and followers• Retweeting, direct messaging and replies• Lists, favourites and hashtagsTwitter Technologies• Twitter clients and services – interfaces, content support, tracking and visualisation etc.• Interconnectivity with other social media – e.g. linking to blogs
  • 12. Twitter: Academic Practice• Knowledge / resource sharing – posting, accessing and ‘retweeting’ links• Notification – new blog posts, publications and bookmarks, events, call for papers, announcements etc.• Self-promotion• ‘Crowdsourcing’ – asking questions, making enquiries, seeking solutions• Real-time social networking and interaction• Real-time search engine• Events and conferences – the ‘backchannel’ and remote conferencing• Institutions and organisations
  • 13. Tagging: BookmarkingPersonal Bookmarking• Personal organisation / management of Bookmarks• Searchable – Tag List / Cloud• Further Organisation Tools – Bundle Tags / Multiple SitesSocial Bookmarking• Use as search engine – keyword / user• Search other users bookmarks• Subscriptions, networks etc.• http://delicious.com• http://pinboard.in• http://evernote.comTagging Content• Tagging also used in blogging, and content sharing sites (e.g. Flickr, YouTube, Slideshare etc.)
  • 14. Content Sharing• Sharing of academic content in different forms / media• Dissemination of work to a wider audience• Tagging and annotation of content• Content can be linked to / embedded on other sites (e.g. blogs)Presentations• e.g. Slideshare http://www.slideshare.netPapers / Documents• e.g. Scribd http://www.scribd.comNetworking Sites• e.g. Academia http://academia.edu
  • 15. Syndication and AggregationThe navigation and management of digital environments through thesyndication and aggregation of multiple sites, tools and services.RSS (Really Simple Syndication)Subscribe to blogs, websites, podcasts etc.Types of RSS / Feed Readers• Desktop-based• Browser-based• Web-basedWeb PortalsIntegration between applications(e.g. http://google/ig, http://netvibes.com etc.)
  • 16. Collaborative EditingGoogle Docs• Collaborative real-time editing of texts and documents• Basic chat functionality• https://docs.google.com/Wikis• Collaborative text development• Collaborative project work and text development• Resource sharing• http://www.wikispaces.com/• http://pbworks.com/• https://sites.google.com/
  • 17. Digital Identity“The persona an individualpresents across all the digitalcommunities in which he or sheis represented”http://thisisme.reading.ac.uk
  • 18. Digital Identit(y/ies): Identity in PracticeIdentity Dichotomies• Public & Private• Work & Recreational• Professional & Personal• Formal & InformalContexts• Social, cultural and professional• Physical, online and virtual• Communities and networks• Social interactions are increasingly distributed – networked individualism’• Multiple domains – multi-membership
  • 19. Digital Identit(y/ies)Modernist (‘Confessional’ Practice)• Identity is determined by dominant social structure• Identity is stable• Identity is singular and developmental• Identity is unified across multiple contextsPostmodernist (‘Critical’ Practice)• Identity is socially constructed and culturally mediated• Identity is flexible – in constant flux• Identity can be multiple and fragmentary• Identity is diversified across multiple contexts
  • 20. Digital Identity and ReputationIdentity Control• Personal profiles• Digital / online CVs and e-Portfolios• Password management (e.g. Open ID)• Ownership and intellectual propertyDigital Artefacts• Records of social interaction – blog posts, tweets, etc.• Permanence - digital artifacts are increasingly searchable / traceableModality• Textual, visual etc.• Multimedia – images, video etc.
  • 21. Summary• Social media both challenges and augments established academic practices• Effectiveness of social media is situated in individual practices and disciplinary knowledge cultures• Should be embedded in everyday academic practice• Researchers need to develop their own strategies and develop context specific solutions• Effective use of social media requires developing reflective and critical practices
  • 22. Reflective and Critical Practices• Identifying appropriate tools and platforms and evaluating their affordances• Developing self- and collaborative organisational and time-management skills• Identifying appropriate training needs and training opportunities• Transference to lifelong learning and professional development contexts• Engaging in opportunities for sharing practice• Developing potential for individual, participatory and collaborative design• Negotiating new socio-technical academic communities and networks• Boundary-crossing of disciplinary and interdisciplinary contexts• Recognising shifts in academic protocols; new modes and means of production, peer review and knowledge resources• Adapting to new practices in academic integrity and responsibility - referencing and attribution of digital sources and artefacts• Negotiating institutional, proprietary, freeware and open-source tools and platforms• Understanding emerging multimedia and multimodal literacies• Managing online identities and reputation
  • 23. http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/graduateschool/resources/socialmedia/index.aspx
  • 24. ThanksAndy Coverdalehttp://phdblog.netTwitter: andycoverdalettxac20@nottingham.ac.uk