Introduction to social media for researchers

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Slides for an introduction to social media for researchers at the University of Bristol, UK, on 5th February 2014.

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  • Aggregation: an automated process that uses software to pull content from different sources
    Curation: “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.” Beth Kanter
  • Aggregation: an automated process that uses software to pull content from different sources
    Curation: “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.” Beth Kanter
  • Aggregation: an automated process that uses software to pull content from different sources
    Curation: “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.” Beth Kanter
  • Aggregation: an automated process that uses software to pull content from different sources
    Curation: “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.” Beth Kanter
  • Aggregation: an automated process that uses software to pull content from different sources
    Curation: “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.” Beth Kanter
  • Aggregation: an automated process that uses software to pull content from different sources
    Curation: “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.” Beth Kanter
  • Aggregation: an automated process that uses software to pull content from different sources
    Curation: “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.” Beth Kanter
  • Aggregation: an automated process that uses software to pull content from different sources
    Curation: “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.” Beth Kanter
  • Aggregation: an automated process that uses software to pull content from different sources
    Curation: “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.” Beth Kanter
  • Aggregation: an automated process that uses software to pull content from different sources
    Curation: “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.” Beth Kanter
  • Aggregation: an automated process that uses software to pull content from different sources
    Curation: “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.” Beth Kanter
  • Aggregation: an automated process that uses software to pull content from different sources
    Curation: “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.” Beth Kanter
  • Aggregation: an automated process that uses software to pull content from different sources
    Curation: “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.” Beth Kanter
  • Aggregation: an automated process that uses software to pull content from different sources
    Curation: “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.” Beth Kanter
  • Aggregation: an automated process that uses software to pull content from different sources
    Curation: “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.” Beth Kanter
  • Aggregation: an automated process that uses software to pull content from different sources
    Curation: “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.” Beth Kanter
  • Aggregation: an automated process that uses software to pull content from different sources
    Curation: “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.” Beth Kanter
  • Aggregation: an automated process that uses software to pull content from different sources
    Curation: “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.” Beth Kanter
  • Aggregation: an automated process that uses software to pull content from different sources
    Curation: “the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.” Beth Kanter
  • Introduction to social media for researchers

    1. 1. Introduction to Social Media for researchers How Social Media can benefit your research and career 1 Gilles Couzin February 2014
    2. 2. About you • In small groups, introduce yourself and say: • Who you are and where you work. • What your research interests are. • What you hope to gain from this workshop. • Share with everyone: • What you hope to gain from this workshop. • Any interesting or surprising facts you learnt about other participants. 2
    3. 3. About this workshop • What are Social Media? • How are they relevant to you as a researcher? • Key Social Media tools for researchers • Risks and concerns • Case studies: • Prof. Alex Marsh from the School for Policy Studies • Dr Matthew Brown from the School of Modern Languages 3
    4. 4. What are social media? 4 I wish Twitter had been invented!
    5. 5. A cynic’s definition: 5 “A continuously evolving collection of time-wasting web- based and mobile applications that demean communication and collaboration between internet trolls* and other social misfits, through the exchange, creation and discussion of mostly irrelevant drivel.” * Internet troll : a person who submits deliberately inflammatory articles to an internet discussion (The Free Dictionary)
    6. 6. An evangelist’s definition: 6 “An umbrella term for a continuously evolving collection of web-based and mobile applications that empower us to interact, communicate, collaborate, connect and learn, through the exchange, creation and discussion of user-generated content.”
    7. 7. Tools of the trade 7 Categories • Content aggregation and curation (e.g. RSS feeds, social bookmarking) • Collaborative writing (e.g. wikis, Google Docs) • Media sharing (e.g. video, photos, presentations) • Blogging & microblogging (e.g. Blogger, Twitter) • Social networking (e.g. Facebook, LinkedIn)
    8. 8. Consuming vs. producing social media Lurking is ok…  a good way to get started and learn the rules  a good way to discover people with similar interest  can be more effective than search engines to gather and filter relevant information 8 Photo by Jean-François Chénier CC BY-NC
    9. 9. Consuming vs. producing social media …but, making your own is the goal!  become a participant in a community  build your reputation  start small (e.g. ‘like’, post a comment on a blog) 9
    10. 10. 10 A conversation space… Illustration by Khalid Albaih CC BY
    11. 11. 11 …rather than a broadcasting platform Illustration by Khalid Albaih CC BY Photo by ehnmark CC BY
    12. 12. How are they relevant to researchers? 12 I must write a blog about this!
    13. 13. Over to you In pairs (or groups of 3 or 4): • Discuss what you do in the course of your research. • What do you do which is similar to other researchers in other disciplines? 13
    14. 14. What you (collectively) do… • Talk to colleagues and exchange ideas. • Attend conferences, listen to speakers and discuss their ideas with them and with your peers. • Have an idea for a paper or project and discuss it with potential co-authors and collaborators. • Write the paper, project proposal or submission jointly with others. • Listen to and ask questions of the stakeholders. • Do the work with project partners and collaborators. • Ensure that the outcome is known about by: • your peers (who may cite you) • others, including the general public, in order to enhance the impact of your work. 14
    15. 15. The academic research cycle 15 From the Research Information Network’s Social Media: A guide for researchers (http://www.rin.ac.uk/our-work/communicating-and-disseminating-research/social-media-guide-researchers)
    16. 16. 1. Identification of knowledge 16 • The ability to find and filter information is a key aspect of research. • Social Media enables you:  to make the most of your professional network…  …to discover more relevant information and filter it more effectively. • RSS feeds, social bookmarking and social citation tools are particularly useful for this function. Flickr photo by zphaze CC BY-NC
    17. 17. 2. Creation of knowledge 17 • Social media can help you:  collaborate more effectively  create opportunities to forge new collaborations and benefit from the experience of others  draw in expertise to help you with research processes (e.g. techniques, methods)  receive feedback as you go  raise the profile of your work more rapidly. • Social networks, wikis, blogs, online office suites like Google Docs are particularly useful. Flickr photo by ragesoss CC BY-SA
    18. 18. 3. Quality assurance of knowledge 18 • Social Media provide tools to:  filter information  share recommendations through social bookmarking and social citation sites  review and discuss new ideas and research  get feedback on your ideas and work Flicker photo by olalindberg CC BY-NC-SA
    19. 19. 4. Dissemination of knowledge 19 • Social Media allows you to:  disseminate your work more widely and more effectively  enhance your online profile  reach out to new audiences  enhance ‘impact’ and maximise dissemination  enhance awareness of your research activities Flickr photo by an untrained eye CC BY-NC
    20. 20. Key social media tools for researchers 20 Flickr photo by Lukeroberts CC BY-SA Maybe I should use a different brush!
    21. 21. Content aggregation and curation tools Content aggregation: An automated process that uses software to pull content from different sources. 21 Content curation: “The process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme.” Beth Kanter - http://www.bethkanter.org/content-curation-101/
    22. 22. Content aggregation and curation 22 Rich Site Summary (RSS) feed An RSS news feed is a format for delivering regularly changing web content.
    23. 23. Content aggregation and curation 23 Use an RSS news aggregator like Feedly (feedly.com)
    24. 24. Content aggregation and curation Diigo: Social bookmarking and much more 24
    25. 25. Reference and citation managers 25 • Network and Discover papers, people and public groups. • Manage citations and bibliographies. • Read and annotate PDFs. • Import and organise PDFs. • Connect with colleagues and securely share your papers, notes and annotations. • Access your papers on the web, iPhone or iPad.
    26. 26. Reference and citation managers 26 (www.mendeley.com) (www.zotero.org) (www.citeulike.org)
    27. 27. Writing collaboration tools 27 Google Docs / Drive • Drive is a file storage and synchronization service. • Docs is a web- based office suite provided as part of Drive. • Easily create and share your work online. • Access from anywhere. • Available with your UoB Gmail account.
    28. 28. Writing collaboration tools 28 Confluence: the University wiki • Can be used as a reflective space. • A space for writing drafts of papers and reports. • Building a knowledge base. • Collaborative authoring of papers and reports. • A document repository for agendas and minutes. • Compiling a manual or glossary of useful terms.
    29. 29. Writing collaboration tools: Wikipedia 29 Dr Evan Jones is a Senior Lecturer in Economic and Social History in the Department of History.
    30. 30. Writing collaboration tools: Wikipedia 30 Dr Evan Jones is a Senior Lecturer in Economic and Social History in the Department of History. “Given the great public interest in the exploits of John Cabot, millions of people had followed the story in the media and many came forward with important information. Some of this information has been used by Evan to update the page on John Cabot in Wikipedia, using the page as an effective way of sharing research findings with the public and as a tool to garner further public contribution. All these developments have resulted in the research becoming an international collaboration, encompassing academics in Italy, Canada, Australia and the United States. It also led to him receiving additional funding, of £120,000, from a private Canadian benefactor.” http://www.bris.ac.uk/research/impact-stories/2012/john-cabot.html
    31. 31. Media sharing tools: videos 31 YouTube • Good way to publicise and promote research. • Helps promote public understanding. • Easy to embed videos in your website or blog. • Build a community of researchers with similar interests. • Helps articulate ideas clearly for a range of audiences. • Get feedback via comments and reviews. http://www.youtube.com/user/BristolIG
    32. 32. Media sharing tools: photos 32 Flickr • Good way to publicise and promote your research. • Easy to embed images in your website or blog. • Provides a photographic record of your research. • 1 terabyte of storage for free! http://www.flickr.com/groups/koehllab
    33. 33. Media sharing tools: presentations 33 SlideShare • An online repository for your presentations. • Easy to embed presentations in your website or blog. • Get feedback from viewers. • Join groups to connect with members who share your interests. • View presentations by other researchers and comment on them. • Good way to publicise and promote your research. http://www.slideshare.net/SarahG_SS/using-impactstory-an-introduction
    34. 34. Blogging and micro-blogging: Blogs 34 • As a collaborative space to keep a log of ideas, resources, events attended, etc. • As a private space for reflection and note- taking (similar to a personal diary). • As a public-facing website to:  develop a personal voice and presence  receive early feedback on research ideas  record reflexions on research or events attended  engage with a wider audience  tell stories related to your research.
    35. 35. Blogging and micro-blogging Blogging tools: 35 (http://www.blogger.com) (http://wordpress.com) (University hosted, can be UoB branded, including UoB URL, e.g. mygroup.blogs.bris.ac.uk) (http://blogs.ilrt.org)
    36. 36. Blogging and micro-blogging: Twitter 36 • Connect with people who have similar interests. • Publicise events, new blog post, etc. • Filtering relevant information. • Participate in discussions (e.g. #ecrchat). • Write short reflective notes during an event (using the event #tag) • Keep up-to-date with funding opps, calls for papers, etc. A waste of time? Yes, for those with time to waste… …a valuable filtering, communication and dissemination channel for everyone else!
    37. 37. Blogging and micro-blogging: Twitter Twitter: anatomy of a “tweet” 37 @ identifies Twitter username (handle) Mention – when you mention someone # (hashtag) used to categorise tweets. Similar to a keyword Short URL Number of times this tweet has been “retweeted” People who have “retweeted” or “Favorited” the tweet For further info on Twitter read the LSE guide guide “Using Twitter in university research, teaching, and impact activities” (http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2011/09/29/twitter-guide/)
    38. 38. Social networking: Facebook 38 Facebook • Allows the creation of a personal profile, groups and pages. • A collaborative space to share with fellow researchers. • Create a conference or workshop page (e.g. Chi2012). • Create private or public spaces for themed discussions. • Promote and publicise your research to a wider audience. • Recruit research participants. • Publish research news as they happen. • Receive early feedback for research ideas. http://www.facebook.com/CHI2012
    39. 39. Social networking: LinkedIn 39 LinkedIn • A professional networking site. • Your online CV and more. • Can include details of:  research activities  Publications • Tend to be easily found by Google. • Join groups and engage in discussions with peers. • Build a professional network beyond the boundaries of academia. • Promote visibility for jobs & consulting opportunities. • Network for funding and employment opportunities.
    40. 40. Researcher-specific social networking services 40 Academia.edu • Aimed at academics across the world. • Provide a list of papers. • Upload open access versions of papers. • Discuss your research and connect with other researchers in your field. • Join and participate in research interest groups.
    41. 41. Researcher-specific social networking services • ResearchGate (www.researchgate.net) – aimed at scientists and other researchers • MethodSpace (www.methodspace.com) – aimed at social scientists, run by SAGE publishing • Colwiz (www.colwiz.com) – research collaboration and productivity platform to manage the entire research lifecycle • ORCID (orcid.org) – an international standard for creating and maintaining a registry of unique researcher IDs and a method of linking research outputs to these identifiers. 41
    42. 42. Over to you In pairs (or groups of 3 or 4) discuss: • whether you think some of these tools might useful to you; • how you might be able to integrate them in your research activities. 42
    43. 43. Risks and concerns 43 I don’t like this pigeon sitting on my head!
    44. 44. Over to you: In pairs (or groups of 3 or 4) discuss: • What concerns do you have about using social media? • What risks do you envisage? • What limitations might social media have in your research area? 44
    45. 45. Concerns, limitations and risks • Information overload… or “filter failure” • Privacy and confidentiality • Ownership, IPR and copyright • Work/life balance • Stability of technology: here/free today, gone/paid tomorrow (e.g. Nature Network)! • Quality and authority: how to separate the wheat from the chaff? • Speed of change of social media technologies 45
    46. 46. Final thoughts N 46 Flickr photo by Stefano Bussolon CC BY-NC
    47. 47. How to become alive: the case of Dr Bex Lewis 47 Her “official” page on the University of Durham website.
    48. 48. How to become alive: the case of Dr Bex Lewis 48 Her personal website.
    49. 49. How to become alive: the case of Dr Bex Lewis 49 Her LinkedIn page.
    50. 50. How to become alive: the case of Dr Bex Lewis 50 Her Twitter account.
    51. 51. How to become alive: the case of Dr Bex Lewis 51 …and finally, her Academia.edu profile!
    52. 52. Top 10 tips to get started 1. Explore online guides (start with delicious.com/uobittraining/social-media-for-researchers). 2. Do some “lurking” (look at examples of good practice). 3. Locate pertinent and relevant online sources (e.g. who to follow on Twitter, interesting bloggers). 4. Start using content aggregation and curation tools (e.g. RSS, Diigo). 5. Identify a few key tools and start with those – know your limits! 6. Develop your network (e.g. LinkedIn, Twitter hashtags). 7. Join academic social network sites (e.g. ResearchGate, Mendeley). 8. Create your own website 9. Start blogging and twittering about your research (or whatever else takes your fancy!). 10. Participate, join in the conversation! 52
    53. 53. Where to find more information • List of social media accounts at the University http://www.bristol.ac.uk/social-media • Making use of social media and mobile applications at the University: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/web/guide/social-media • Research Information Network – Social Media: A guide for researchers http://www.rin.ac.uk/our-work/communicating-and-disseminating- research/social-media-guide-researchers • Vitae Innovate / Open University – Handbook of social media for researchers and supervisors http://www.vitae.ac.uk/policy-practice/567271/Handbook-of-social-media- for-researchers-and-supervisors.html • Links to social media resources for researchers on Delicious http://delicious.com/uobittraining/social-media-for-researchers 53
    54. 54. Questions? 54
    55. 55. Credits and licence Some of the ideas in this presentation are based on Using Social Media to Enhance Your Research Activities by Brian Kelly available at http://ukwebfocus.wordpress.com/2013/12/18/using-social- media-to-enhance-your-research-activities-workshop/ under the Creative Commons Attribution Unported 3.0 (CC BY 3.0) licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/). This presentation is licenced under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/). 55

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