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PAPER 0130Social media practicesBenefits and risks for doctoral researchersAndy CoverdaleSchool of Education | University ...
THE DOCTORAL CONTEXT   Social media adoption and use   In context with established practices:        – Legitimise forms of...
DETERRITORIALISATION      Spaces of Enclosure (Edwards & Usher, 2008)      Affinity Spaces (Gee, 2004)      Academic Tribe...
y                       alit              - form ency                -f requ nt                         e                 ...
BARRIERS?
Time-consumingLow initial rewardsLack of knowledge / awareness (‘best practices’)TechnophobiaLack of institutional / depar...
PRACTICE        Time-consuming                Low initial rewards                Lack of knowledge / awareness (‘best prac...
BLOGGING CONTENTCommentary on general academic activities – teaching, internships andresearch projectsReports on academic ...
BLOGGING PURPOSES Writing practice – experimenting, developing and refining ‘academic voice’ Writing discipline – regulari...
Based on: Jacob E Bardram | The “Fish Model” (2007) http://www.itu.dk/people/bardram/pmwiki/?n=Main.ArtPhD
BLOG > THESISContribute to the development of formal textsWork-in-progress – shape ideas, concepts and methodologiesPresen...
SOME FINAL THOUGHTS   Social media practice as a contested space   Institutional leveraging of social media (platforms and...
Thanks!This presentation is available on my blog http://www.phdblog.net
Social media practices: Benefits and risks for doctoral researchers
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Social media practices: Benefits and risks for doctoral researchers

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Presentation at the SRHE Annual Research Conference 2012, Celtic Manor, 12-14 December 2012, as part of a symposium: Feral spaces? Social media as higher education practice: Blogs, wikis, and twitter feeds with a pedagogical intent (with Pat Thomson, Inger Mewburn, Anna Tarrant and Jeremy Segrott).
http://www.srhe.ac.uk/conference2012/

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Social media practices: Benefits and risks for doctoral researchers

  1. 1. PAPER 0130Social media practicesBenefits and risks for doctoral researchersAndy CoverdaleSchool of Education | University of NottinghamSRHE Conference | Celtic Manor | 14 December 2012
  2. 2. THE DOCTORAL CONTEXT Social media adoption and use In context with established practices: – Legitimise forms of academic quality and reward – Regulate processes of induction and socialisation Social media as disruptive technology – opportunities and challenges Paradox – engagement vs. conformity Framing the ‘feral’ in social media practice: – Deterritorialisation – Granularity
  3. 3. DETERRITORIALISATION Spaces of Enclosure (Edwards & Usher, 2008) Affinity Spaces (Gee, 2004) Academic Tribes and Territories (Becher & Trowler, 1989)
  4. 4. y alit - form ency -f requ nt e - cont t -f orma - lengthGRANULARITY
  5. 5. BARRIERS?
  6. 6. Time-consumingLow initial rewardsLack of knowledge / awareness (‘best practices’)TechnophobiaLack of institutional / departmental supportInstitutional constraints or regulationsNot formally recognised / rewarded by institutionInsignificant and frivolousEgocentric, opinionated and self-publicisingNot trustworthy, unreliable contentLack of academic rigourSocial media as a ‘commercial imperative’ (non-academic)Compromise formal publication opportunitiesThreats to representation (self, institution, research)Risks of disclosure (research design, findings etc.)Issues of privacyCopyright and IPPotential misappropriation of contentRisk of exposing academic naivety / immaturityLow regard of contribution – “I’ve nothing to say”Compromise existing personal / recreational use and online identitiesCompromise professional relationships (e.g. lecturer / student)
  7. 7. PRACTICE Time-consuming Low initial rewards Lack of knowledge / awareness (‘best practices’) Technophobia Lack of institutional / departmental support Institutional constraints or regulations Not formally recognised / rewarded by institutionLEGITIMACY Insignificant and frivolous Egocentric, opinionated and self-publicising Not trustworthy, unreliable content Lack of academic rigour Social media as a ‘commercial imperative’ (non-academic) Compromise formal publication opportunities Threats to representation (self, institution, research)RISK AVERSION Risks of disclosure (research design, findings etc.) Issues of privacy Copyright and IP Potential misappropriation of content Risk of exposing academic naivety / immaturity Low regard of contribution – “I’ve nothing to say” Compromise existing personal / recreational use and online identities Compromise professional relationships (e.g. lecturer / student)
  8. 8. BLOGGING CONTENTCommentary on general academic activities – teaching, internships andresearch projectsReports on academic events – workshops, seminars and conferences(including ‘live-blogging’)Development of theoretical and conceptual thinkingResearch methods and methodologiesAcademic writing practicesUsing research tools and softwareTraining and professional developmentEmotional development and well-being related to academic practiceBook and article reviews
  9. 9. BLOGGING PURPOSES Writing practice – experimenting, developing and refining ‘academic voice’ Writing discipline – regularity, time-constraints Identity work – defining research and professional contexts Scoping – potential leads and future collaborations Self-promotion – skills, knowledge and experience Engaging with wider audience – including interdisciplinary and non-academic Informal peer review – blogging and commenting Exploring wider contexts of research field – sociocultural, political and economic Advocacy – doctoral, disciplinary and departmental Biographical – creative and reflective processes of narrative and documentation Contribute to networking activities
  10. 10. Based on: Jacob E Bardram | The “Fish Model” (2007) http://www.itu.dk/people/bardram/pmwiki/?n=Main.ArtPhD
  11. 11. BLOG > THESISContribute to the development of formal textsWork-in-progress – shape ideas, concepts and methodologiesPresent personal perspectives, experiences and subjectivities BLOG THESIS ‘Blogify’ formal texts Present summaries of formal texts and personal perspectives Public engagement (non-specialist, non-academic) THESIS > BLOG
  12. 12. SOME FINAL THOUGHTS Social media practice as a contested space Institutional leveraging of social media (platforms and practices) Impact, outreach and public engagement agendas Output vs. process
  13. 13. Thanks!This presentation is available on my blog http://www.phdblog.net

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