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Transit-oriented development (TOD): Integrating rail and commercial development schemes

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Atkins' technical director Jason Hutchings explores the ways in which cities across the world can gain maximum benefit from their investment in transport, commercial and civic projects through transit …

Atkins' technical director Jason Hutchings explores the ways in which cities across the world can gain maximum benefit from their investment in transport, commercial and civic projects through transit oriented development (TOD). TOD facilitates and encourages the use of public transport and provides alternative revenue streams for transport providers and operators, reducing their reliance on state funding for capital investment and operation/maintenance costs. It means transit systems are more popular, accessible and better connected for the commuting population, and commercial property development can be integrated and benefit from such a holistic approach to critical city centre locations. But TOD is not without its challenges. Atkins illustrates the issues and solutions across a range of international projects.

This presentation was first delivered in May 2013 at the 3rd Annual Modern Railways Conference, Singapore.

Published in: Engineering

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  • 1. Transit-oriented development (TOD) – integrating rail and commercial development schemes 3rd Annual Modern Railways Conference, Singapore Atkins Lectures
  • 2. Jason Hutchings, technical director, Architecture 29-31 May 2013
  • 3. Developing an integrated solution from the start In any process, the ability to affect change is greatest at the beginning, and the cost of change is greatest at the end. Transit-oriented development (TOD) projects are complex and take a long time to deliver but must include the requirements of other sectors as early as possible.
  • 4. What is transit-oriented development (TOD)? TOD allows the transport operator to benefit from alternative revenue, and increased ridership. In turn, this provides opportunity for better services to be offered to the public. One third of Hong Kong’s Mass Transit Railway Corporation revenue comes from non-fare box receipts.
  • 5. Profit Diversity – Mass Transit Railway Corporation (Hong Kong) In Hong Kong, operating profit from the transport services (blue) is less than profit from other businesses. This profit allows re-investment in the transport system and means the operator can always provide a world-class service. Profit from retail and property management
  • 6. Transport / land use Planning Stage one - Strategy Planning Stage two - Station Planning Stage three - Scheme Development Transport corridor plan Preliminary Route Investigation Engineering Property Retail Advertising Fare box Constr. cost Positive Impact on Profit Property Railway / Station Design Financing Strategy Property master plan Station planning Alignment engineering Railway operations Transport network plan Station design layout Engineering design Commercial / retail plan Property design TOD/ Urban Design TODStation property opportunities Case for Investment Outline business case Full business case Land-use optimisation Main Some Little Three-stage strategy
  • 7. Civil benefits of TOD – Birmingham New Street Station (UK) In Birmingham (UK), Atkins’ re-development of New Street station as a TOD is promoting movement of pedestrians through the centre of the city and acting as a catalyst for urban regeneration to the South. Old New
  • 8. Civic benefits of TOD – Birmingham New Street Station (UK) This refurbishment project (the largest in Europe) creates an innovative transport interchange, a place to meet and a destination at the heart of the city.
  • 9. Social benefits of TOD – Pingouyuan, Beijing (China) In providing good, safe connections to adjacent plots, this TOD is supported by the government as it increases the value of land and acts a catalyst for urban regeneration in this previously industrial area. Understanding passenger movement is a key part of the success of TOD retail and commercial planning.
  • 10. TOD resolves and improves transport services The reprovision of a large bus station in the basement of this TOD project in Chongqing (China) improved transport services, reduced congestion, and provided a flow of people through the retail areas.
  • 11. TOD resolves and improves transport services By designing a waiting ‘lounge’ above the bus station (similar to Birmingham New Street), passengers are provided with improved conditions, amenity and direct access to/through the retail mall.
  • 12. TOD connects sites and increases safety for pedestrians For Atkins’ TOD design in Guizhou (China), all four parts of the project are connected by a retail ‘ring’, which provides safe and convenient pedestrian movement to/from the station, and above the busy road intersection.
  • 13. TOD connects sites and increases safety for pedestrians The ‘ring’ is a retail bridge, increasing the developer’s ability to generate revenue and creating an exciting, vibrant and safe environment for the public and for residents of the towers and adjacent developments.
  • 14. Transport planning and passenger movement analysis Atkins use computer modeling to predict the movement of people through transport projects, like this one in Norway, and identify possible congestion, overcrowding or inefficient design.
  • 15. Transport planning and passenger movement analysis Other programmes predict how people will move through cities and buildings based on visibility. (That is, people are likely to move to where or what they can see.) This is a heat map of Leeds (UK) showing highly visible areas in red. High Low Visual Connections
  • 16. Transport planning and passenger movement analysis How far can a person see in the city, and if they move what can they see then? This Atkins computer program determines the visual connectivity of a place. 1 2 3 4
  • 17. Combining people movement and value By combining the analysis of people movement with land-use and value, Atkins is helping London authorities plan successful and vibrant streets.
  • 18. Combining people movement and value In Washington DC (USA), Atkins is identifying which shops people are more likely to walk past. We are then able to improve circulation to create increased opportunities for commercial success.
  • 19. Summary 1. Consider TOD at the beginning of a project, to maximise sustainability 2. Recognise the value of public transport and integrate the network 3. Holistic masterplanning to maximise public transport use 4. Locate stations to serve existing communities and facilitate future growth (including urban regeneration) 5. Maximise connectivity and encourage and engage modal transfer 6. Think horizontally and vertically.
  • 20. For more information contact: Jason Hutchings jason.hutchings@atkinsglobal.com
  • 21. Celebrating 75 years of design, engineering and project management excellence. www.atkinsglobal.com