Stuttering
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Stuttering

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This presentation contains information regarding stuttering (a type of disfluency). Its definition, characteristics, onset and management/intervention.

This presentation contains information regarding stuttering (a type of disfluency). Its definition, characteristics, onset and management/intervention.

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  • periods of days, weeks or even months pass between episodes of disfluency. Gradually, the interval shrinks and the problem becomes chronic and consistent. (Cullata & Goldberg, 1995)
  • Gyrations - circular or spiral motion; revolution ; rotation; whirling.
  • gyrations
  • gyrations
  • – “ talking to his dog until he would fall asleep” - had a stutter as a child and had problems with the letter B. He overcomes it through over-articulation which he turned into a comic device.
  • Alice in Wonderland - hoped to become a priest but was not allowed to because of his stuttering.

Stuttering Stuttering Presentation Transcript

  • Stuttering Ancellie Espino Raizel Rose Leuterio
  • Overview  Definition  Core and Secondary Behaviors  Onset  Management/Intervention  Sample Case/s
  • What is Stuttering?
  • What Differentiates Stuttering from Other Types of Disfluencies?1. Disfluency pattern is highly episodic at first then gradually becomes chronic and consistent.2. Symptoms can be modified by any number of clinical manipulations -- helpful for differential diagnosis. e.g. Adaptation effect (Johnson and Knott, 1937)3. Distractibility when presented with white noise, speaking in time to a metronome, singing group recitation, finger tapping, arm swinging.4. [bae-baesbaul]  [b^-b^-baesbaul]
  • Core Behaviors
  • Core Behaviors Blocks - typically the last behavior to appear; occurs whena person inappropriately stops the flow of air or voiceand often the movement of his articulators as well.(Guitar,2006)
  • Secondary Behaviors Presence of an apparent struggle toproduce sounds and words that havelittle to do with speech production:jaw tremors, head shaking, eyeclosing, or total body gyrations Absent during fluentcommunication productions
  • Secondary Behaviors
  • Secondary Behaviors
  • Onset may occur at any time duringchildhood, from the beginning ofmultiword utterances, around 18months, until puberty, around 11 ortwelve years of age. most likely to occur between ages 2and 5 years. (Andrew et al, 1983)
  • Developmental Phases of Stuttering
  • Developmental Phases of Stuttering
  • Developmental Phases of Stuttering
  • Developmental Phases of Stuttering
  • Management/InterventionReduce the frequency of stutteringReduce the abnormality of stutteringReduce negative feelings about stuttering andabout speakingReduce negative thoughts and attitudes aboutstuttering and about speakingReduce avoidanceIncrease overall communication abilitiesCreate an environment that facilitates fluency
  • Famous People Who Stutter
  • Learn well your grammar, And never stammer, Write well and neatly, And sing soft sweetly, Drink tea, not coffee; Never eat toffy. Eat bread with butter. Once more dont stutter. - Lewis Carroll
  • References
  • Thank you for listening! Have a blessed day! Soli Deo Gloria! :D