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Aboriginal Peoples and HPV Prevention
Aboriginal Peoples and HPV Prevention
Aboriginal Peoples and HPV Prevention
Aboriginal Peoples and HPV Prevention
Aboriginal Peoples and HPV Prevention
Aboriginal Peoples and HPV Prevention
Aboriginal Peoples and HPV Prevention
Aboriginal Peoples and HPV Prevention
Aboriginal Peoples and HPV Prevention
Aboriginal Peoples and HPV Prevention
Aboriginal Peoples and HPV Prevention
Aboriginal Peoples and HPV Prevention
Aboriginal Peoples and HPV Prevention
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Aboriginal Peoples and HPV Prevention

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26th International Papillomavirus Conference: Satellite Symposium …

26th International Papillomavirus Conference: Satellite Symposium
Enhancing HPV Prevention among Indigenous Populations: International Perspectives on Health and Well-Being
Montreal, Quebec
July 5, 2010

Opening Address

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  • Far north – Inuit NWT – Dene YK – Gwichin & Tlingit BC – Haida, Tsimshian, Chinook, Shuswap, Salish, Kutenai AB – Beaver, Blackfoot, Blood SK – Plains Cree, Assiniboine MB – Plains Cree ON – Cree, Ojibwa, Algonquin, Mohawk, Oneida, Onandaga, Cayuga, Seneca, Erie, Huron QC – Algonquin, Inuu (Montagnais) Atlantic – Mi’kmaq Nfdld – Beothuk Labrador – Innu Language groups: Athapaskan, Tlingit, Tsimshian, Haida, Wakashan Salishan, Eskimoan, Algonquin, Kutenai, Siouan Iroquoian
  • ACCORDING TO CANADA’S 2006 CENSUS THERE ARE 31.6 MILLION PEOPLE IN CANADA OUT OF WHICH 1.2 MILLION ARE FIRST NATIONS, INUIT OR METIS AND ARE REPRESENTED ACROSS CANADA MAINLY IN THE NORTHERN AND WESTERN PROVINCES AND TERRITORIES. THE PERCENTAGES SHOWN ON THE MAP REPRESENT THE AMOUNT OF PEOPLE THAT ARE FIRST NATIONS, INUIT AND METIS IN THE PROVINCES AND TERRITORIES OF CANADA. Yk – 25% NWT - 50% Nunuavut - 85% BC – 5% AB – 6% SK – 15% MB – 15% ON – 2% QC – 1% NB – 2% NS – 3 % PEI –1% NFD/LB – 5%
  • REGIONAL REFERENCES Healy SM, Aronson KJ, Mao Y, Schlecht NF, Mery LS, Ferenczy A, et al. 2001. Oncogenic human papillomavirus infection and cervical lesions in Aboriginal women of Nunavut, Canada. Sex Transm Dis. 2001; 28(12):694-700. Band PR, Gallagher RP, Threlfall WJ, Hislop TG, Deschamps M, Smith J. 1992. Rate of death from cervical cancer among native Indian women in British Columbia. Canadian Medical Association Journal. 1992; 147(12):1802-4. Marrett LD, Chaudhry M. 2003. Cancer incidence and mortality in Ontario First Nations, 1968-1991 (Canada). Cancer Causes Control. 2003; 14(3):259-68. Young TK, Kliewer E, Blanchard J, Mayer T. 2000. Monitoring disease burden and preventive behavior with data linkage:Cervical cancer among Aboriginal people in Manitoba, Canada. American Journal of Public Health. 2000; 90(9):1466-8. Louchinin R, Beaupre M. 2008. Cancer incidence and mortality among Aboriginal people living on reserves and northern villages in Quebec, 1988-2004. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2008; 67(5):445-51.
  • Transcript

    • 1. 26 th International Papillomavirus Conference Palais Des Congres, Montreal, Quebec Aboriginal Peoples & HPV Prevention Paulette Tremblay, Ph.D., Chief Executive Officer July 5, 2010
    • 2. Mission <ul><li>NAHO advances and promotes the health and well-being of all First Nations, Inuit and Métis through collaborative research, Indigenous Traditional Knowledge, building capacity and community led initiatives. </li></ul>
    • 3. Good Health <ul><li>Good health for Aboriginal People is much more than the physical, it is seen as a “state of balance and harmony involving body, mind, emotions and spirit. It links each person to family, community and the earth in a circle of dependence and interdependence.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ True health comes from the connectedness of human systems, not their separate dynamics” (RCAP, 1996, Vol. 3, pp. 153 & 221). </li></ul>
    • 4.  
    • 5. Aboriginal 1,172,785 non-Aboriginal 30,068,780 First Nations 698,025 Inuit 50,480 Métis 389,780 Aboriginal Peoples in Canada 2006 Census, Statistics Canada
    • 6. Where do Aboriginal People live in Canada? 2006 Census
    • 7. Characteristics of Aboriginal Peoples in Canada – 2006 Census Data <ul><li>The fastest growing segment of the population - nearly 6 times faster than the 8 per cent increase for the non-Aboriginal population. </li></ul><ul><li>Represents a young population with the median age of the Inuit   - 22 years </li></ul><ul><li>First Nations - 25 years </li></ul><ul><li>Métis - 30 years </li></ul><ul><li>Non-Aboriginal - 40 years. </li></ul><ul><li>54 per cent of Aboriginal people live in urban areas. </li></ul>
    • 8. HPV in Canada <ul><li>Highest rates of HPV in Canada are among women and men between the ages of 15-24. </li></ul><ul><li>The central causal factor of cervical cancer is HPV. </li></ul><ul><li>Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in Canadian women between the ages of 20-44. </li></ul><ul><li>About 1350 new cases of cervical cancer in Canada each year. </li></ul><ul><li>Approximately 400 deaths due to cervical cancer each year. (SOGC, 2007 & 2009) </li></ul>
    • 9. HPV & First Nations, Inuit & M étis <ul><li>Paucity of information regarding HPV screening rates and immunization efforts for First Nations, Inuit and M étis. </li></ul><ul><li>No national data on cervical cancer rates for First Nations, Inuit and M étis. </li></ul>
    • 10. Findings of Regional Studies <ul><li>Higher prevalence of HPV among Aboriginal peoples compared to other Canadians. </li></ul><ul><li>Prevalence of HPV highest among younger Aboriginal women and men under the age of 30 with odds for HPV infection highest for 13-20 year old females. </li></ul><ul><li>Prevalence of cervical cancer among Aboriginal females was found to be 1 to 3 times greater among Aboriginal females compared to the general provincial populations. </li></ul><ul><li>Relative rate of death from cervical cancer for Aboriginal females was 2 to 4 times greater compared to general provincial populations. </li></ul>
    • 11. Challenges <ul><li>Little to no knowledge of HPV in communities. </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of services and shortage of health care providers in remote and northern communities. </li></ul><ul><li>Access to services, distance, and transportation. </li></ul><ul><li>Lower screening rates for Aboriginal women & poor attendance at follow up appointments. </li></ul><ul><li>Negative encounters with health care providers. </li></ul><ul><li>Communication, language, and cultural appropriate programs & services. </li></ul><ul><li>Funding & shortages of trained female and Aboriginal staff. </li></ul><ul><li>(NAHO, 2006, Cancer of the Cervix in North American Indian Women: A Literature Review) </li></ul>
    • 12. Moving Forward <ul><li>Need to fill the information gap among First Nations, Inuit and Métis youth, parents, health care workers, communities, schools, and health centres regarding HPV through awareness campaigns. </li></ul><ul><li>Education and services must be culturally appropriate to the specific population in question and must take into account specific historical and contemporary realities. </li></ul><ul><li>Secure the support and cooperation of service providers in clinics and assist orientation to a prevention approach. </li></ul><ul><li>Recruit First Nations, Inuit, and Métis women to participate in cervical cancer screening programs. </li></ul><ul><li>Need more research regarding HPV and cervical cancer. </li></ul><ul><li>Increased collaboration and cooperation among all stakeholders. </li></ul>
    • 13. For more information contact: NAHO/ONSA Suite 1200 220 Laurier Avenue W. Ottawa, ON K1P 5Z9 1-877-602-4445 www.naho.ca

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