The use of Social Media for Sexual Health Promotion among First Nations, Inuit and Metis Youth

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Presented by Colleen Patterson, Senior Communications Officer,
Building and Enhancing Capacity for Hepatitis C Prevention
International Development Research Centre
November 4, 2012

Published in: Health & Medicine
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  • Key message:
    Great things can happen when youth are brought together to created products they are interested in and invested in.
  • Half of the:
    Inuit population is 22 years old and younger
    First Nations population is 25 years old and younger
    Métis population is 30 years old and younger
    Non-Aboriginal population is 40 years old and younger.
  • From the 2004 Report on Aboriginal Community Connectivity Infrastructure by the Aboriginal Canada Portal survey team in cooperation with Indian and Northern Affairs Canada.
  • Question audience on what social media tools they currently utilize and/or are familiar with.
  • Unlike media, social media is interactive, easily changed, accessible, available in real time, easily linked, reusable, etc.
    Blogs, wikis rss, online chat, video sharing, social networking, photo sharing, micro blogs…
    Traditional media such as printed publications and broadcast television are experiencing shrinking audiences as social media expands.
  • Twitter users: About 6 million. Kazeniac, Andy (2009-02-09). "Social Networks: Facebook Takes Over Top Spot, Twitter Climbs". Compete.com. http://blog.compete.com/2009/02/09/facebook-myspace-twitter-social-network/. Retrieved 2009-02-17.
    400,000,000 activeusers on Facebook: OVER 13,000,000 in CANADA
    http://www.digitalbuzzblog.com/facebook-statistics-facts-figures-for-2010/
    Figures provided by Facebook
    % of companies using LinkedIn as a primary tool to find employees….80%
    27.3 million tweets per day (Nov. 2009)http://royal.pingdom.com/2010/01/22/internet-2009-in-numbers/
  • http://www.facebook.com/#!/group.php?gid=2397400368&ref=search&sid=_DYvOOw5np8E1i3NFgBG5A.979243329..1
    NAHO uses facebook for groups, mascot profiles and fan pages to engage its stakeholders.
    Facebook is very popular among the Aboriginal population. There are over 15, 000 individuals in the facebook group, Natives on Facebook.
    3 NARMP role models have been trained (through a partnership with SOGC) to speak about sexual health on their community visits.
  • NAHO COORDINATES THE NATIONAL ABORIGINAL ROLE MODEL PROGRAM. 12 YOUTH ARE CHOSEN ANNUALLY AS ROLE MODELS AND MAKE COMMUNITY VISITS.
    WE GIVE THE ROLE MODELS THE OPPORTUNITY TO BLOG ABOUT THEIR EXPERIENCE.
    SOME DO AND SOME DON’T. THIS IS THE KEY TO SUCCESS WITH THINGS LIKE BLOGS – YOU CANT MAKE PEOPLE DO IT.
    NOT EVERYBODY IS COMFORTABLE WITH SOCIAL MEDIA.
    WE TRIED TO HAVE A COUPLE OF OUR RESEARCHERS BLOG. SOME PEOPLE ARE JUST NOT COMFORTABLE WITH BEING “OUT THERE”.
  • TWITTER IS THE BIG THING RIGHT NOW AND IT DOESN’T LOOK LIKE THAT’S GOING TO CHANGE ANYTIME SOON.
    IT’S A VERY INTERESTING TOOL.
    TWITTER, IS A HUGELY IMPORTANT PART OF OUR COMMUNICATIONS WORK.
    TWITTER HAS LINKED US WITH INDIGENOUS PEOPLES ORGANIZATIONS AROUND THE GLOBE, LINKED NAHO WITH HEALTH PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND RESEARCHERS, AND GIVEN US A SUPPORTIVE AND HELPFUL COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNITY THAT WE HAVE COME TO DEPEND ON.
    NAHO has 522 new followers (Nov 2010), this is an increase of over 150 followers since June.
  • This screen capture was taken November 5, 2010 at 10:00 a.m. to illustrate the use of twitter hashtags (#) as a search tool.
    It basically turns the word into a key word / link and by clicking on the results you get relevant information on the topic you are searching.
  • This screen capture was taken November 5, 2010 at 10:00 a.m. to illustrate the use of twitter hashtags (#) as a search tool.
    It basically turns the word into a key word / link and by clicking on the results you get relevant information on the topic you are searching.
  • ONE OF THE GREAT THINGS ABOUT THE INTERNET IS THAT IT HAS REALLY DEMOCRATIZED VIDEO.
    IT IS VERY EASY AND INEXPENSIVE TO MAKE WEB READY VIDEO.
    WE HEAR TIME AND TIME AGAIN THAT VIDEO WORKS LIKE NOTHING ELSE TO COMMUNICATE WITH ABORIGINAL PEOPLES.
    RECENTLY, WE LAUNCHED OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL WHERE WE ARE POSTING ALL OF THE VIDEOS WE’VE WORKED ON IN THE PAST.
    WE INITIALLY STARTED MAKING OUR OWN SHORT VIDEOS – MOCK MEDIA INTERVIEWS WITH OUR CEO. ITS FUN, EASY AND REALLY INEXPENSIVE.
    We have also received funding to make do larger productions on topics such as Sexual Health, Immunization and Suicide Prevention. All will be released this fiscal year.
  • History with Anchorage meeting.
  • Committee planned the event via teleconference and closed facebook group discussion.
  • NAHO partnered with Ilisaqsivik Society in Clyde River, Nunavut to work with 5 youth to develop a sexual health messaging video.
    Clyde River is located North of 70, North east side of Baffin Island. White island on top right of screen.
    Northern youth insist while they have issues specific to their geographic region they have many similarities to urban youth in the regions of Winnipeg, Edmonton, Ottawa, Montreal, where their families often migrate to and from.
    As such, the video project must be relate able to Northern and Urban Inuit youth.
  • Produced a 12 minute sexual health messaging video with additional footage from the service provider in English and Inuktitut.
    Special peer to peer message from female lead to all youth about healthy sexual health decision making.
    Combined themes of healthy sexuality with importance of condom use to reduce STI transmission.
  • Findings are the result of all the youth projects funded by FNIHB, not just the Inuit one.
  • Findings are the result of all the youth pilot projects funded by FNIHB, not just the Inuit one.
    An invitation to First Nations, Inuit and Métis youth and organizations was distributed in December 2009.
    The purpose was to pilot messaging projects using a form of social media and addressing one of three key priority messages identified.
    Social media projects were initiated to engage youth in developing their own STBBI messages to reach their peers.
    Upon review of the proposal submissions, it was determined that there were no Inuit specific submissions and as a result PHAC supported four projects (three developed by First Nations youth for First Nations youth and one targeted towards First Nations, Inuit and Métis youth).
    Since there was no Inuit specific project proposal received, PHAC was unable to support an Inuit specific initiative. Thus a gap was created.
    Utilizing remaining funds from the WORKSHOP FOR FIRST NATIONS, INUIT AND MÉTIS YOUTH: SEXUAL HEALTH PROMOTION AND SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED AND BLOOD BORNE INFECTIONS (STBBI) PREVENTION MESSAGING USING SOCIAL MEDIA, NAHO proposed to create an Inuit youth sexual health video messaging project by investing in a partnership with the Ilisaqsivik Society in Clyde River, Nunavut.
  • The use of Social Media for Sexual Health Promotion among First Nations, Inuit and Metis Youth

    1. 1. National Aboriginal Health Organization The Use of Social Media for Sexual Health Promotion among First Nations, Inuit and Métis youth Colleen Patterson, Senior Communications Officer Workshop: Building and Enhancing Capacity for Hepatitis C Prevention Venue: International Development Research Centre (IDRC) 150 Kent Street, Ottawa November 4, 2010 2:40 p.m.
    2. 2. National Aboriginal Health Organization Mission The National Aboriginal Health Organization advances and promotes the health and well-being of all First Nations, Inuit and Métis through collaborative research, Indigenous Traditional Knowledge, building capacity, and community led initiatives.
    3. 3. National Aboriginal Health Organization First Nations, Inuit and Métis • First Nations, Inuit and Métis are recognized as the three original peoples in Canada. • Each population is distinct from the others and has a unique history. • Within Each group there is considerable diversity. • First Nations, Inuit and Métis are a young and growing population.
    4. 4. National Aboriginal Health Organization Internet Access at the Community Level • 88% of Aboriginal communities have access to internet (Band Office, Community Access Points, School and household levels) • 49% Dial-up and 42% High Speed • 77% had some form of access at the household level. 4
    5. 5. National Aboriginal Health Organization What is Social Media? 5
    6. 6. National Aboriginal Health Organization What is Social Media? Simply put… 6 Social Media is people having conversations online.
    7. 7. National Aboriginal Health Organization Hmmmm. • Wikipedia has more than 4,000,000 articles • 200,000,000 blogs • Youtube has more than 100,000,000 videos • 400,000,000 active users on Facebook • Internet access growing in Canada • Twitter has about 6,000,000 unique visitors to it’s site each month. 27.3 million tweets per day (Nov. 2009) 7
    8. 8. National Aboriginal Health Organization 8
    9. 9. National Aboriginal Health Organization Blogs 9
    10. 10. National Aboriginal Health Organization Twitter! 10
    11. 11. National Aboriginal Health Organization Twitter hashtag for Hepatitis
    12. 12. National Aboriginal Health Organization Twitter hashtag for HCV
    13. 13. National Aboriginal Health Organization NAHO News - Youtube 13
    14. 14. National Aboriginal Health Organization Background • In 2008 a steering committee formed which included a number of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis youth stakeholders, representatives from NAHO, PHAC and Health Canada. • Gaining interest in user-generated content.
    15. 15. National Aboriginal Health Organization Purpose of Youth Messaging Initiative The First Nations, Inuit and Métis Youth STBBI Messaging Initiative (Youth Messaging Initiative, YMI) aims to make effective use of relevant technologies and social media to reach and engage First Nations, Inuit and Métis youth in Canada for sexual health promotion and STBBI prevention.
    16. 16. National Aboriginal Health Organization YMI History To Date An environmental scan was conducted in spring 2009 NAHO hosted a workshop with First Nations, Inuit and Métis youth from across Canada to identify priorities and best ways to reach youth using social media. Youth made recommendations for future initiatives. Pilot Projects were supported by PHAC and FNIHB in 2010.
    17. 17. National Aboriginal Health Organization Key Priorities Identified by First Nations, Inuit and Métis Youth Through the NAHO workshop, three key messaging priorities were identified: • Normalizing healthy sexuality. • Get tested (normalizing testing like any other test, i.e. diabetes). • Awareness building in general and recognizing needs of different audiences.
    18. 18. National Aboriginal Health Organization A holistic understanding of sexual health • First Nations, Inuit and Métis youth shared the issues that are related to STI’s, HIV and other bloodborne infections like Hep C that are in their own communities. • Stigma, education, knowledge, poverty and support were key themes discussed by youth, • These themes are inter-related and youth emphasized the importance of a holistic approach.
    19. 19. National Aboriginal Health Organization 19
    20. 20. National Aboriginal Health Organization Inuit Sexual Health Messaging Ilisaqsivik Society/NAHO Focus group of 5 youth Message: access to condoms and negotiating safer sex. Youth scripted 3 scenes + 2 additional scenes Plain/traditional language and messaging. With Guidance youth can come up with great ideas.
    21. 21. National Aboriginal Health Organization Findings: Lessons Learned • Engaging First Nations, Inuit and Métis youth as partners from concept onwards has led to an informed approach to the development of STBBI messaging. • The process yielded lessons learned on what worked and did not work well in creating social media products. • A good balance of mentors and professionals supporting and working with youth to develop the projects.
    22. 22. National Aboriginal Health Organization Findings: Lessons Learned Good resources already exist, adaptation of resources through consultation and involvement of youth can be effective. Youth are interested, it’s not difficult to find them, but long-term involvement is the challenge. Needs to be a coordinating piece to regularly engage and update youth on activities, resources, etc. Males are gaining more interest in being role models in this area.
    23. 23. National Aboriginal Health Organization Questions or Further Discussion NAHO 220 Laurier Ave. W. Suite 1200 Ottawa, ON K1P 5Z9 Phone: (613) 237-9462 Toll Free: 877-602-4445 Fax: (613) 237-1810 E-mail: info@naho.ca Web site: www.naho.ca

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