Update on fish value chain development in Egypt
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Update on fish value chain development in Egypt

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Presented by Malcolm Beveridge at the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish Planning meeting, Nairobi, 27-29 September 2011

Presented by Malcolm Beveridge at the CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish Planning meeting, Nairobi, 27-29 September 2011

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Update on fish value chain development in Egypt Update on fish value chain development in Egypt Presentation Transcript

  • Update on fish value chain development in EgyptMalcolm Beveridge (WorldFish Center)CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish Planning meeting Nairobi, 27-29 September 2011
  • target value chain structure and impact
  • Egypt – general vision and outcome General Vision • With partners, we will work to understand aquaculture value chains in Egypt so that we can identify market-based interventions which, when implemented, help develop efficient, pro-poor and sustainable value chains Outcome • Increased supplies of affordable, nutritious food, increased employment and equitable benefits to actors throughout the value chain
  • Existing and probable project inventoryCurrently Funded Projects Level of effort, areas of focus (roughly approximate to resource allocation but reflecting areas where outputs and outcomes are expected)Project title Location, Countries Species Donor End Funds Technology development VC Development Targeting, gender & date remaining at impact mm/yy end 2011 % mapped to (1000s of $) Animal Geneti Feeds Ecosyst Sectora VC VC Spatial Gende M&E CRP3.7 health cs/ em l and Assess Innova , r& and breedi Policy ment tion syste equity impact ng ms & HHNational breeding program for Egypt Tilapia ARDF May-12 14 100%genetically improved N. Tilapia 100% Level of effort, areas of focus (roughly approximate to resource allocationImpending Projects (strong likelihood of funding) but reflecting areas where outputs and outcomes are expected)Project title (Probability) Location, Countries Species Donor End Total Technology development VC Development Targeting, gender & date funding impact % mm/yy (1000s Animal Geneti Feeds Ecosyst Sectora VC VC Spatial Gende M&E mapped of $) health cs/ em l and Assess Innova , r& and to CRP3.7 breedi Policy ment tion syste equity impact ng ms & HHDevelopment of Egypt’s aquaculture Egypt Aquacultu SDC Apr-15 2373 25% 50% 25%sector - SDC (50%) 100% re • total = ~$US 2.5 million; mostly genetics
  • strategic partnerships • national – ARC and GAFRD – universities – industry • regional and global – CARE – ARIs – industry
  • Egypt – value chain development objectives• produce more fish for the poor• create employment for marginalized youth and women Direct and indirect aquaculture employment, Kafr el-Sheikh Feed Feed mills retailers Wholesale traders Collection •Al-Obour auctions Retail (Cairo) •Zawiya •Fish shops •Alexandria •Damro •Restaurants •Kafr el Sheikh •Local markets Hatcheries •Desouk •Other •Baltim •Supermarkets governorates Producers •Fewa •etc Fertiliser producers Input Suppliers Traders Ice factories Transport Plastics factory Other services (telephone, food, etc) source: Finegold et al. (2009)
  • Egypt – producing more fish • production increases must come largely from increased productivity how?numbers of producers • better - more profitable - technologies – seed, feed and water • better management productivity t ha-1 • capacity building
  • Egypt – increasing employment • expand production – profitability • more productive technologies • better management • new product lines; new markets – better trained (youth; women) – stronger organizations – improved value chain governance – enabling institutional framework
  • sub-component work plans and activities
  • sub-component work plans – 2012 Priority Outcomes 1. Capacity in VCA methods built among partners in Egypt 2. Improved understanding of aquaculture VCs, including the roles of women in input, production and output aquaculture VC components, and their structure and efficiency Priority Outputs 1. VCA completed for various aquaculture VCs in Egypt 2. Baseline data collected 3. Analytical framework for VC development to meet objectives developed 4. Priority interventions identified 5. Genetic improvement program continued
  • sub-component work plans – 2012 Priority Organizational, Capacity Development and Communication Activities 1. Recruit an additional VC scientist, Egypt 2. Restructure team to match CRP needs 3. Identify and develop collaboration on innovation across 3.7 Centers 4. Conduct an assessment of our capacity and that of partners to support genetic improvement plan in Egyptian VC Priority Resource Mobilization Activities 1. VCA 2. Technology development (development of genetically improved strains) 3. Cross-project evaluation of VCA process, development of better metrics and guidelines
  • sub-component work plans – 2013 Priority Outcomes 1. More farms established; farm productivity increased 2. Aquaculture value chain development is occurring in program areas, increasing fish production, creating employment 3. Fish prices stabilized 4. Gross margins for farms using unimproved and improved strains understood Priority Outputs 1. Value chain interventions trialed and impacts on production, profitability and employment understood 2. Partner hatcheries are producing genetically improved fish 3. First commercial trials with genetically improved Abbassa (Egypt) strain tilapia completed and results effectively disseminated among aquaculture producers 4. Relationships between fish production, prices and consumption understood
  • sub-component work plans – 2013 Priority Organizational, Capacity Development and Communication Activities • Continued team building to meet evolving program needs • Analysis of skills gaps identified and recruitment pursued Priority Resource Mobilization Activities • Collaborative efforts with partners to seek funds for expansion of VC analysis work in Egypt and Uganda pursued
  • implementation plan – 2012
  • gaps, resource mobilization needs and opportunities
  • funding gap, needs and opportunities • funding gap estimated at ~ $US 7 million – multiplication and distribution of genetically improved seed – technology development – capacity building of farmers • opportunities – investment to stabilize food security – changes in governance