Philip Sheldrake - Web 3.0 and The Internet of Things

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  • 1. THE FUTURE IS NOW. AN INTRODUCTION TO WEB3.0 AND THE INTERNET OF THINGS AS THEY ARE HAPPENING TODAY AND AS THEY IMPACT MARKETING & PUBLIC RELATIONS1
  • 2. Philip Sheldrake Influence Crowd LLP, www.influencecrowd.com Meanwhile, www.wearemeanwhile.com Blog, www.philipsheldrake.com LinkedIn /in/philipsheldrake @sheldrake CIPR SOCIAL SUMMER SERIES #CIPR #CIPRSM 23rd June 20112
  • 3. My goal today These technologies massively impact marketing and PR. We are about to witness a technological Cambrian explosion. Today is about gaining an insight into this explosion. We can only begin to determine the effects if we deeply understand the causes. We’ll broach some of the effects in conversation, but we don’t have time to explore them in any detail today. My goal: provide you with serious food for thought.3 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 4. My book  The topics in today’s presentation are covered in my book, The Business of Influence: Reframing Marketing and PR for the Digital Age. www.influenceprofessional.com4 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 5. “Web 3.0” “The Web of Data” THE SEMANTIC WEB5 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 6. Web 1.0 Fellow Londoner Sir Tim Berners-Lee put the first website online 6th August 1991, and things have moved pretty fast since then. The first consumer Web revolution was embodied by companies such as Yahoo!, AOL, Amazon, eBay, PayPal, Ticketmaster and services such as browser based email and online banking. This was the Transactional Web if you like, retrospectively labeled Web 1.0.6 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 7. Web 2.0 “A powerful global conversation has begun. Through the Internet, people are discovering and inventing new ways to share relevant knowledge with blinding speed. As a direct result, markets are getting smarter – and getting smarter faster than most companies. “These markets are conversations. Their members communicate in language that is natural, open, honest, direct, funny and often shocking. Whether explaining or complaining, joking or serious, the human voice is unmistakably genuine. It cant be faked.” Cluetrain Manifesto, 19997 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 8. Web 3.0 Whilst there is some confusion over the term, most people use “Web 3.0” to refer to the Semantic Web. I do. Either way, the label is a bit of a distraction, but marketers love it, so what can I say! I use the terms interchangeably here, and we explain it in the following slides.8 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 9. Web 3.0 cont. If Web 2.0 was all about (user generated) content and community participation, Web 3.0 is about the Web itself understanding the meaning of all the content and participation. Indeed, the Web becomes a universal medium for data, information and knowledge exchange.9 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 10. The document metaphor You can consider the development of the Web as having been informed by a document metaphor:  Files, desktop, documents  Open, read, close  Everything has a location (like files in a filing cabinet).10 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 11. The URL The location of a document is specified with a Unique Resource Locator (URL).  Eg, http://influencecrowd.com/philip_sheldrake/index.php The folder. The file. The domain name that relates to an IP address of a server (via a domain name server (DNS)), in this case right now a shared server at 69.89.31.175. Stipulates the protocol for retrieving the resource.11 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 12. Triples A hypothesis of the Semantic Web is that meaning can be conveyed via expressions known as triples: Subject Predicate Object (resource) (property) (value) Kathryn Bigelow Directed Hurt Locker Mark Boal Wrote Hurt Locker Hurt Locker Stars Jeremy Renner12 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 13. RDF Resource Description Framework (RDF) is a language at the heart of the Semantic Web for expressing data models using statements expressed as triples. And the secret sauce?... to avoid ambiguities, each and every subject, predicate and object of a triple can be referred to uniquely with a URL (objects can have literal values too however).13 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 14. Local and global Subject Predicate Object (resource) (property) (value) Philip Sheldrake Knows Doc Searls We could define all three of these locally, in our own little worlds, but all three are likely to be referred to elsewhere too. And that’s where the power of the Semantic Web starts to kick in.14 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 15. The subject and object I’m not the one and only Philip Sheldrake. Eg, Professor Philip Sheldrake is a Professorial Research Fellow in the Department of Theology and Religion at Durham University. So how do we define me uniquely? Well, with reference to: http://sheldrake.myopenid.com or http://philipsheldrake.com or http://www.google.com/profiles/philip.sheldrake. Similarly, Doc Searls may be http://searls.com.15 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 16. The predicate But what about the concept of “knows”? What does “knows” mean to you right now? What about in different social contexts? How might other cultures and languages regard “knows”? Eg, The French language has “savoir” & “connaître”.16 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 17. The predicate cont. Well FOAF (Friend Of A Friend) is a machine-readable ontology / vocabulary describing persons, their activities and their relations to other people and objects. To invoke reference to the FOAF ontology we write: <rdf:RDF xmlns:foaf=http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/> At that URI we will find a definition of “knows”: http://xmlns.com/foaf/spec/#term_knows17 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 18. The resultant triple So now, when we express a statement as a triple like Subject - http://philipsheldrake.com Predicate - foaf:knows Object - http://searls.com there is no ambiguity as to what it means. Note: this format is for explanation purposes only and does not constitute sound syntax!18 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 19. Simple complicated http://xkcd.com/355 How about?! http://xkcd.com/stickman foaf:complicated http://xkcd.com/stickwoman19 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 20. RDF is happening today RDF is being used today by:  dbpedia – a project to represent Wikipedia content in RDF  data.gov.uk – making the UK’s data mashable!  Amazon.com – to mark up its and its partners’ products  bbc.co.uk – Aunty Beeb is well along the RDF road, in fact you could consider the BBC to be a global leader in the publishing, news and content world.20 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 21. News from the IPTC In April 2010, the International Press Telecommunications Council announced the official launch and widespread adoption of its G2 family of news exchange standards, supported by:  Agence France-Presse  Associated Press  dpa  The Press Association  Thomson Reuters It’s XML, and contains some RDF components.21 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 22. Google loves RDF GoodRelations is the name of an ontology for ecommerce. Jay Myers, Lead Web Development Engineer for Best Buy, reported that applying GoodRelations:  Improved the rank of the respective pages in Google tremendously  Increased traffic on the BestBuy stores pages by 30%. Search Engine Strategies 2009 conference, Chicago. http://ebusiness-unibw.org/pipermail/goodrelations/2009-December/000152.html22 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 23. Google’s rich snippets Google reads semantically marked up content and, as of May 2009, uses it to create “rich snippets” it in its search results. Eg, This “rich snippet” is possible only because Pocket-lint marks its content up semantically and to a standard recognised by Google. http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2009/05/introducing-rich-snippets.html23 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 24. The full potential I referred earlier to the Semantic Web’s full potential, and that full potential is described by a vision known as Linked Data. The following diagram of Linked Data, and ones like it, are as important to PR and marketing professionals as any Web 2.0 illustration you will have seen bandied around over the years.24 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 25. LinkedData image Chris Bizer http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Lod-datasets_2010-09-22_colored.png Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.025 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 26. See Linked Data in action Visit http://relfinder.dbpedia.org/relfinder.html Type "Million Dollar Baby" in the 1st box Type "Letters from Iwo Jima" in the 2nd box …selecting the first result the engine finds for both. Now click "Find Relations" and sit back and feel the power of the semantic Web! Click the boxes with rounded corners. Movie databases are one of the first data sources to be RDF’d, but this kind of analysis will become increasingly possible in Semantic Web browsers whatever your search terms as the Semantic Web continues to grow.26 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 27. Tim Berners-Lee on the Semantic Web http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=HeUrEh-nqtU27 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 28. (Today’s) Facebook is dead The Web of Data exposes connections, correlations, relationships. Discovery is the new search. Discovery is the new social graph. The founding business models of Web 1.0 companies such as eBay and Rightmove, and Web 2.0 companies such as Facebook and LinkedIn, which rely on network effects – where the analytical power accrues to the host with the largest data set so more data is gravitationally attracted – are dead.28 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 29. Reputation management has a new meaning Some pundits already refer to Google’s search engine as the “reputation engine”. With a specific intention in mind, one can seek out various facts and opinions relating to an organisation, a product or service. With Web 3.0, the multi-dimensional informational assets can be extracted, synthesised and presented to you real-time to take a stroll through. Extant agents work on your behalf to analyse and identify information thought to be most useful to you (based on your “digital detritus” for example).29 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 30. THE INTERNET OF THINGS30 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 31. Defining the Internet of Things The Internet of Things refers to a network of objects not historically connected. We can consider four kinds of objects:  The device containing electronics in order to fulfil its primary function (eg, washing machine, car, aircon unit)  The electrical device traditionally absent of sophisticated electronics (eg, lighting, heating, power distribution)  Non-electrical objects (eg, food and drink packages, animals, clothing)  Environmental sensors (eg, for variables such as temperature, ambient sound and moisture). See the CASAGRAS Final Report for more detailed definition.31 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 32. IBM Internet of Things video http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=sfEbMV295Kk32 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 33. Digital detritus Each and every one of us is going to be kicking off more data describing our use of digital products and services; what some refer to as our digital exhaust or digital footprint, and I like to call digital detritus. Detritus is a biological word for discarded organic matter, such as leaf litter for example, which is then decomposed by microorganisms and re-appropriated by animal and plant life. It is then interestingly analogous to our regard for and treatment of this data we’re all shedding.33 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 34. Digital detritus cont. We collect the clickpath of visitors’ interactions with our website today, but we can’t yet access the data describing their use of physical products. We can invite customers to share their location data with us via their mobile phones, but we can’t yet help them review their driving style (excepting Fiat’s Ecodrive facility) or use of public transport.34 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 35. Digital detritus cont. We can encourage the consumer to reap the anticipated advantages of greener products and services, but we can’t identify the actual advantage they achieve and reflect it back at them. We can market a food product’s expected role in a balanced diet, but not the specific role it plays in a particular household’s diet.35 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 36. Some questions for you… Does Sony sell you a TV or a home entertainment service? Does Fiat sell you a car or a transportation service? How might preventative maintenance be designed and marketed? How does this transform the concept of a warranty, and how might such a redesign of the proposition lay new foundations for a lifetime relationship with the customer?36 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 37. Some questions for you… cont. Is every future marketing communication personalised (and I’m not just referring to the address field!)? How will your customers employ Web 3.0 technologies to mashup their personal and collective use of your products and services? What customer information should you have access to? What should be customer opt-in? What benefits might you offer to entice the customer to share more? …lends a whole new meaning to conversational marketing.37 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 38. Vendor Relationship Management VRM is the other side of the CRM coin. How might you wield semantic Web technologies and the Internet of Things to empower your customers?38 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 39. Two guys walk into a store… Your in-store marketing system detects one is dressed predominantly in clothes from Primark, the other Prada. How does your in-store customer communications respond? How might this impact your real-time pricing strategy? _______________ I have >100 slides like these. Why not make up your own?39 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 40. Optimisation slide With the current paucity of “meaning”, forgive me for helping search engines help others find this presentation:  Marketing and Web 3.0  Marketing and the Semantic Web  Marketing and Linked Data  Marketing and the Internet of Things  Advertising and Web 3.0  Advertising and the Semantic Web  Advertising and Linked Data  Advertising and the Internet of Things  Public relations and Web 3.0  Public relations and the Semantic Web  Public relations and Linked Data  Public relations and the Internet of Things40 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales
  • 41. Reading http://semanticweb.org http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantic_Web http://linkeddata.org http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linked_data http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_of_Things http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/internet-of-things http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vendor_Relationship_Management http://www.philipsheldrake.com - my blog41 23rd June 2011 / Influence Crowd LLP / Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike License 2.0 England and Wales