Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Design Meets Disability
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Design Meets Disability

1,603
views

Published on

Sharon Rush's talk from Big Design Conference 2012. Sharon explains how designing for disability is another design requirement.

Sharon Rush's talk from Big Design Conference 2012. Sharon explains how designing for disability is another design requirement.

Published in: Design, Technology

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,603
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Accessible vs Inclusive
  • Disability is age related. More seniors are online, many aging baby-boomers expect technology to work for them. While disability is often associated with poverty, as people live longer, there is a prosperous group of consumers who require accommodation. It is a market that should not be ignored.Some people are born with disability.Some people get sick or have an accident .Some people develop disability as they age.“The reality is that just about everyone – women, men and children of all races and ethnicities – will experience a disability at some time during his or her lifetime.”US HHS Office on Disabilityhttp://www.hhs.gov/od/about/fact_sheets/whatisdisability.htmlFortune: “$1 trillion annual market”$200 B in discretionary spending
  • Accessibility as a civil rightCorporate responsibilityGovernment obligation to serve allNonprofit mission of inclusion
  • the Italian Pellegrino Turri in 1808 for his blind friend Countess Carolina Fantoni da Fivizzono (as established by Michael Adler in his excellent 1973 book The Writing Machine); unfortunately, we do not know what the machine looked like, but we do have specimens of letters written by the Countess on it. Numerous inventors in Europe and the U.S. worked on typewriters in the 19th century, but successful commercial production began only with the "writing ball" of Danish pastor Malling Hansen (1870). This well-engineered device looked rather like a pincushion. Nietzsche's mother and sister once gave him one for Christmas. He hated it.
  • Based on the latest developments in neuro-technology, Emotiv has developed a revolutionary new personal interface for human computer interaction.  The Emotiv EPOC is a high resolution, neuro-signal acquisition and processing wireless neuroheadset.  It uses a set of sensors to tune into electric signals produced by the brain to detect player thoughts, feelings and expressions and connects wirelessly to most PCs. Headset Features: Limited edition design  14 saline sensors offer optimal positioning for accurate spatial resolution  Gyroscope generates optimal positional information for cursor and camera controls  Hi-performance wireless gives users total range of motion  Dongle is USB compatible and requires no custom drivers  Lithium Battery provides 12 hours of continuous useThe limited edition EPOC is released in the US in limited quantities, and early users will have access to the Emotiv App Store and the very first games and programs developed exclusively for this one-of-a-kind neuro-technology platform. Developers are currently utilizing Emotiv EPOC technology in a variety of new and exciting ways. Artistic and creative expression - Use your thoughts, feeling, and emotion to dynamically create color, music, and art. Life changing applications for disabled patients, such as controlling an electric wheelchair, mind-keyboard, or playing a hands-free game.Games & Virtual Worlds - Experience the fantasy of controlling and influencing the virtual environment with your mind. Play games developed specifically for the EPOC, or use the EmoKey to connect to current PC games and experience them in a completely new way.Market Research & Advertising - get true insight about how people respond and feel about material presented to them. Get real-time feedback on user enjoyment and engagement.  Included Free with the Emotiv EPOC: EmoKeyEmoKey links the Emotiv technology to your applications by easily converting detected events into any combination of keystrokes. EmoKey is a nonintrusive, lightweight, background process that runs behind your existing applications or games. EmoKey lets you create profiles that define how detections are mapped to keystroke combinations. Your profiles can then be saved and shared so you can use profiles that your friends have created for your favorite games and software. EmoKey profiles can be as simple as linking the Expressiv smile detection to characters such as ":)", so that chat applications instantly know when you smile. Or they can be as complex as linking a "lift" command to a sequence of keystrokes that trigger a levitation spell in a game. When combined, the Emotiv EPOC neuroheadset and Emokey make your inputs more simple, personal, natural, and direct. There's no need for keystroke combinations, simply smile or focus on a command and your applications respond. Use EmoKey to interact with your digital applications like instant messaging and virtual environments, or experience your current PC games in a completely new way. Based on the latest developments in neuro-technology, Emotiv has developed a revolutionary new personal interface for human computer interaction.  The Emotiv EPOC is a high resolution, neuro-signal acquisition and processing wireless neuroheadset.  It uses a set of sensors to tune into electric signals produced by the brain to detect player thoughts, feelings and expressions and connects wirelessly to most PCs. Headset Features: Limited edition design  14 saline sensors offer optimal positioning for accurate spatial resolution  Gyroscope generates optimal positional information for cursor and camera controls  Hi-performance wireless gives users total range of motion  Dongle is USB compatible and requires no custom drivers  Lithium Battery provides 12 hours of continuous useThe limited edition EPOC is released in the US in limited quantities, and early users will have access to the Emotiv App Store and the very first games and programs developed exclusively for this one-of-a-kind neuro-technology platform. Developers are currently utilizing Emotiv EPOC technology in a variety of new and exciting ways. Artistic and creative expression - Use your thoughts, feeling, and emotion to dynamically create color, music, and art. Life changing applications for disabled patients, such as controlling an electric wheelchair, mind-keyboard, or playing a hands-free game.Games & Virtual Worlds - Experience the fantasy of controlling and influencing the virtual environment with your mind. Play games developed specifically for the EPOC, or use the EmoKey to connect to current PC games and experience them in a completely new way.Market Research & Advertising - get true insight about how people respond and feel about material presented to them. Get real-time feedback on user enjoyment and engagement.  Included Free with the Emotiv EPOC: EmoKeyEmoKey links the Emotiv technology to your applications by easily converting detected events into any combination of keystrokes. EmoKey is a nonintrusive, lightweight, background process that runs behind your existing applications or games. EmoKey lets you create profiles that define how detections are mapped to keystroke combinations. Your profiles can then be saved and shared so you can use profiles that your friends have created for your favorite games and software. EmoKey profiles can be as simple as linking the Expressiv smile detection to characters such as ":)", so that chat applications instantly know when you smile. Or they can be as complex as linking a "lift" command to a sequence of keystrokes that trigger a levitation spell in a game. When combined, the Emotiv EPOC neuroheadset and Emokey make your inputs more simple, personal, natural, and direct. There's no need for keystroke combinations, simply smile or focus on a command and your applications respond. Use EmoKey to interact with your digital applications like instant messaging and virtual environments, or experience your current PC games in a completely new way.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Design Meets Disability
      Big (D)esign 2011
      Sharron Rush
      July 15
      Good design is accessible design
      ~ Dr. John Slatin
    • 2. Knowbility
      • 501(c)3 nonprofit organization
      • 3. Based in Austin Texas
      • 4. Advocacy, training, and consulting for accessible technology since 1998
    • Accessible
      People with disabilities
      …can acquire the same information
      …participate in the same activities
      …be active producers
    • 5. Why advocate for inclusive design?
      Legal Technical
      Market
      Humanitarian Visionary
    • 6. Legal Mandates
      International – UN Declaration on Rights of People with Disabilities
      Global requirements based on WCAG2
      US Federal standards, Section 508
      Other national laws
      State and local laws
    • 7. Demographic Forces
      Number of people with disabilities is growing
      55 million Americans / 1 billion worldwide
      Fortune: “$1 trillion annual market” in US
      $200 billion in discretionary spending
      • More as population ages
    • Improved technical performance
      • Harmonize with global standards
      • 8. Internationalization
      • 9. Demonstrated ROI
    • How to advocate?
      Depends on where you and company are…
      Develop policy with practices that support it
      Assess legal risks in your industry
      Form interest group
      Hold information/demo sessions
      Include people with disabilities
      Participate in AIR (or start one)
      Be honest
    • 10. Steps to IT Accessibility
      Convene wide group of stakeholders
      Make commitment - adopt explicit policy
      Provide support, including training and internal resources
      Develop implementation plan
      Test, verify, repair – and use feedback loops
      Integrate into purchasing process
      Include people with disabilities
      Maintain timetable to evaluate and revise
    • 11. Because we can!
    • 12. Typewriter
      The Italian romantic
      PelligrinoTurri
      Blind Countess that he loved Carolina Fantoni da Fivizzono
    • 13. Telephone
      Alexander Graham Bell
      Mother and wife were deaf
    • 14. Punch Card
      Non-text method for capturing data
      An IBM founder
      Herman Hollerith was learning disabled
    • 15. Design meets disability today
    • 16. Braingate research uses brain waves as UI control
      Watch the subject control computer screen and prosthetic arm
    • 17. LifeHand Project allows brain control of robotic arm
      PierpaoloPetruzziello's amputated arm was connected to a robotic limb, allowing him to feel sensations and control the arm with his thoughts.
    • 18. Mainstream Uses
      Tan Le, cofounder
      Emotivneuro tech interface
    • 19. Universal design
      Allows access by widest array of UI
      Designing to standards allows innovation
      www.w3.org/WAI
    • 20. A few examples…
      Austin Independent School District
      Ticket Sales
      Southern California Edison
      Financial Services
      University of California
    • 21. Surprise! …the accessible iPhone
      Apple accessibility came late, but is changing the paradigm of disability and tech
    • 22. Screenshot of Knowbility AccessWorks signup page
    • 23. Let’s Talk
      Image of phone made of tin cans
    • 24. Please stay in touch…
      www.Knowbility.org
      srush@knowbility.org
      512 305-0310
      Twitter: @knowbility
      Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/#!/knowbility
      Thank you!

    ×