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David Banes
Mada Centre
April 15 2010
History of Assistive Technology
Models of Disability
 Religious
 Medical
 Social
Definition of Assistive Technology
 Any item, piece of equipment, or system, whether acquired
commercially, modified, or ...
Assistive Technology across the spectrum
 Mobility
 Daily Life
 Environmental control
 Literacy
 Communication
AT/IT
 Mechanical
AT/IT
 Early Experiments
 Standalone Devices
 BBC Micro
 Win 3.1
AT/IT Windows and Beyond
 Integration of AT into ICT’s
 Accessibility Options
 Supported Third Party Devices
 Hardware...
Accessibility and the OS
Third party devices – growth in demand
Hardware
Software
Vision
Hearing
Physical
Reading and Writing
Communication
The Future – Trends in Assistive Technology
AT/IT – Advent of Mobility
 Mobile Phones
 PDA’s
 Netbooks
AT/IT – AT in the Cloud
 System Access to Go
 Write Online
AT/IT – Ubiquitous and Pervasive AT
 Inredis
AT/IT – Next steps
 Touch
 Voice
 Brain
 Gesture
AT/IT - Convergence
 AT/IT impacts on
 Mobility
 Daily Life
 Environmental control
 Literacy
 Communications
Key themes
 Enabling Access – not mending the user
 Access embedded – designed for access not retrofit
 Anytime Anywher...
Assistive Technology past present and future
Assistive Technology past present and future
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Assistive Technology past present and future

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This is a presentation used to stimulate discussion around trends and looking ahead - it poses many questions about what enabling technology will mean within a generation

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Assistive Technology past present and future

  1. 1. David Banes Mada Centre April 15 2010 History of Assistive Technology
  2. 2. Models of Disability  Religious  Medical  Social
  3. 3. Definition of Assistive Technology  Any item, piece of equipment, or system, whether acquired commercially, modified, or customized, that is commonly used to increase, maintain, or improve functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities. (section 508 ADA)  Assistive technology is hardware or software that helps a person use the computer. Assistive technologies include screen reader software (provides an aural translation of the information on the screen), voice recognition software (allows people to navigate with voice rather than a keyboard or mouse), and many input devices such as large keyboards and mouse pedals. (ADE)
  4. 4. Assistive Technology across the spectrum  Mobility  Daily Life  Environmental control  Literacy  Communication
  5. 5. AT/IT  Mechanical
  6. 6. AT/IT  Early Experiments  Standalone Devices  BBC Micro  Win 3.1
  7. 7. AT/IT Windows and Beyond  Integration of AT into ICT’s  Accessibility Options  Supported Third Party Devices  Hardware  Software
  8. 8. Accessibility and the OS
  9. 9. Third party devices – growth in demand
  10. 10. Hardware
  11. 11. Software
  12. 12. Vision
  13. 13. Hearing
  14. 14. Physical
  15. 15. Reading and Writing
  16. 16. Communication
  17. 17. The Future – Trends in Assistive Technology
  18. 18. AT/IT – Advent of Mobility  Mobile Phones  PDA’s  Netbooks
  19. 19. AT/IT – AT in the Cloud  System Access to Go  Write Online
  20. 20. AT/IT – Ubiquitous and Pervasive AT  Inredis
  21. 21. AT/IT – Next steps  Touch  Voice  Brain  Gesture
  22. 22. AT/IT - Convergence  AT/IT impacts on  Mobility  Daily Life  Environmental control  Literacy  Communications
  23. 23. Key themes  Enabling Access – not mending the user  Access embedded – designed for access not retrofit  Anytime Anywhere Access  Portable  Mobile  Pervasive  Converged Technologies  Transference into mainstream – no limitations

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