Karin Talbert Addison -"Addressing Obesity in the Commonwealth"

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The Youth-Nex Conference on Physical Health and Well-Being for Youth, Oct 10 & 11, 2013, University of Virginia

Karin Talbert Addison - Assistant Secretary for Children's Health and Education

Wrap-Up Panel. This panel will kicked off the final discussion of the conference's two day dialogue. Panelists suggest directions for public policy to help promote physical activity, health and well-being in children and adolescents.

Website: http://bit.ly/YNCONF13

Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
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  • The Virginia Youth Survey provides data on high school obesity prevalence and health risk behaviors. To expand the data available, the VA Foundation for Healthy Youth administered the Virginia Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey to gather data for middle school students. From these surveys we can begin to identify trends, draw comparisons, and look at specific age groups and demographics. The Virginia Youth Survey is administered with assistance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC selects schools to participate utilizing a random sampling method. The CDC also provides validated survey questions for use in all states to allow for comparison. The survey is designed to be completed in one class period and provides data for students ages 13 to 18 enrolled in Virginia high schools. To provide expanded data for Virginia, the Virginia Foundation for Healthy Youth administered the Virginia Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey. This survey used CDC-validated survey questions and was given to students 10 to 16 enrolled in the Virginia middle schools
  • Obesity is common, serious and costlyMore than one-third of U.S. adults (35.7%) are obese. Obesity-related conditions include heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer, some of the leading causes of preventable death. By state, obesity prevalence ranged from 20.7% in Colorado to 34.9% in Mississippi in 2011. No state had a prevalence of obesity less than 20%. 39 states had a prevalence of 25% or more; 12 of these states had a prevalence of 30% or more: Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas, and West Virginia. The South had the highest prevalence of obesity (29.5%), followed by the Midwest (29.0%), the Northeast (25.3%) and the West (24.3%).Obesity continues to be a major health concern in our nation and throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia. Virginia currently ranks 15th among the nation’s most obese states according to the Trust for America’s Health “F as in Fat” report.
  • Obesity is common, serious and costlyMore than one-third of U.S. adults (35.7%) are obese. Obesity-related conditions include heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer, some of the leading causes of preventable death. By state, obesity prevalence ranged from 20.7% in Colorado to 34.9% in Mississippi in 2011. No state had a prevalence of obesity less than 20%. 39 states had a prevalence of 25% or more; 12 of these states had a prevalence of 30% or more: Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas, and West Virginia. The South had the highest prevalence of obesity (29.5%), followed by the Midwest (29.0%), the Northeast (25.3%) and the West (24.3%).Obesity continues to be a major health concern in our nation and throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia. Virginia currently ranks 15th among the nation’s most obese states according to the Trust for America’s Health “F as in Fat” report.
  • Obesity is common, serious and costlyMore than one-third of U.S. adults (35.7%) are obese. Obesity-related conditions include heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer, some of the leading causes of preventable death. By state, obesity prevalence ranged from 20.7% in Colorado to 34.9% in Mississippi in 2011. No state had a prevalence of obesity less than 20%. 39 states had a prevalence of 25% or more; 12 of these states had a prevalence of 30% or more: Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas, and West Virginia. The South had the highest prevalence of obesity (29.5%), followed by the Midwest (29.0%), the Northeast (25.3%) and the West (24.3%).Obesity continues to be a major health concern in our nation and throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia. Virginia currently ranks 15th among the nation’s most obese states according to the Trust for America’s Health “F as in Fat” report.
  • Obesity prevalence among children has nearly tripled over the past three decades. In America today, practically one in three children are either obese or overweight. The numbers are even higher in African-American and Hispanic communities, where nearly 40% of the children are overweight or obese. Childhood obesity has been associated with cardiovascular risk factors, increased health care costs, and premature death. Children who are obese or extremely obese during early childhood are also likely to be obese during middle or late childhood and adulthood.If we don't solve this problem, one-third of all children born in 2000 or later will suffer from diabetes at some point in their lives.
  • We are beginning to see some signs of progress, thanks to efforts in increasing access to healthy foods and opportunities for physical activities coupled with standards for early childcare centers and messaging to parents. For the first time, we are seeing that obesity and extreme obesity among U.S. low-income, preschool-aged children has decreased. According to theCDC’s national study, from 2003 through 2010, the prevalence of obesity decreased slightly, from 15.21% to 14.94%. Similarly, the prevalence of extreme obesity decreased from 2.22% to 2.07%. That’s a step in the right direction.
  • From the Virginia Youth Survey, we can begin to look at where we as a state are in terms of overweight and obesity.The obesity rates for high school youth in Virginia at 11 percent are lower than the national average of 13 percent. However, 17.2 percent of youth in Virginia are overweight, which is a higher prevalence compared to the national rate of 15.2 percent of overweight youth.
  • In looking at gender differences, among Virginia high school youth, boys are more likely to be overweight and obese than girls. Approximately, 1 out of every 4 (24.1 percent) girls is considered overweight or obese whereas, 1 out of every 3 (36.5%) boys is either overweight or obese.
  • When comparing between age groups, middle school youth obesity prevalence at 12 percent is slightly above the high school obesity prevalence (11 percent).
  • According to the survey, the highest childhood overweight/obesity rate is found in Southeast Virginia, with 36%, closely followed by Southwest Virginia, with 35%%. Obesity rates are lowest in Central Virginia and Northern Virginia.
  • As we all know, obesity is a multi-faceted problem and health behaviors and environments play a large role in the childhood obesity epidemic. Over the last 30 years, American lifestyles have dramatically changed. Children would walk to and from school every day and in the afternoons neighborhood kids would be playing outdoors until the street lights came on. Home-cooked meals were usually served and portion sizes were reasonable. But today, walks to and from school have been replaced by car and bus rides. Gym class and after-school sports have been cut; afternoons are now spent with TV, video games and the Internet. Parents are busier than ever and families eat fewer home-cooked meals. Snacking between meals is now commonplace.
  • Today, people’s lifestyles are quite different. In 2011, 83 percent of high school students did not eat the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables each day.
  • And only 24 percent of high school students met the recommended 60 minutes of physical activity each day.
  • Children today are trading their activity time with screen time. According to the Virginia Youth Survey, 77% of students reported MORE than two hours of total screen time per day.
  • Sugar-sweetened beverages are a main source of added calories and sugar in the daily diets of children. 1 out of 7 (14%) Virginia youth consume soda at least three times a day, increasing their chances of becoming obese by more than 60%.
  • Many children consume at least half of their meals at school, and for low-income children, food served at school may be the only food they regularly eat. Virginia public schools have been committed to make changes throughout the state to better our youth’s health and to teach the importance of practicing healthy behaviors.
  • The Virginia Farm to School Program has been an opportunity for schools and local farmers to work together to increase fresh and nutritious products offered in schools. Local school nutrition programs have invited farmers into the classrooms and cafeterias and have featured Virginia-grown foods such as apples, broccoli, and sweet potatoes. Since 2010, the Virginia General Assembly has recognized the second week of November as Virginia Farm to School Week. This year Farm to School Week will take place from November 11 to November 15. Due to the success of the Farm to School Program, 85.9 percent of school divisions have taken steps to serve meals featuring local foods.
  • In 2010, the Healthy and Hunger Free Kids Act was signed into law, improving school nutrition. Nationally, more than 31 million children receive meals through the federally assisted National School Lunch Program. Of those children, 17 million come from food-insecure households. That is why schools are often considered to be on the front lines of the obesity epidemic. Based on recommendations from the Institute of Medicine, the new school meals include these changes: More whole grains, fruits, and vegetables; low-fat milk dairy products; and less sodium and fat. The right portion. Menus are planned for grades K-5, 6-8 and 9-12 and will demonstrate right size portions.Additional funding will be made available to schools that meet the new standards. Schools will be reimbursed an additional 6 cents for each lunch they serve in accordance with the new standards.
  • Virginia schools also participate in the Healthier U.S. School Challenge, which recognizes excellence in nutrition and physical activity. The Healthier U.S. School Challenge (HUSSC) establishes rigorous standards for schools' food quality, participation in meal programs, physical activity opportunities and nutrition education. This nationwide program has encouraged spurred schools all across the country to transform their environments into places where healthy eating and physical activity is experienced and learned. Schools that are doing the very best work to keep kids healthy are recognized and even receive monetary incentives251 schools in nine different Virginia school districts have received awards. Virginia schools have also worked to set tougher standards for competitive foods.Later in the conference you will hear from the Virginia Department of Education’s School Nutrition Director on changes that have been made to the school lunch programs across the state, including increasing fruits and vegetables.
  • In addition to improved meal quality, many Virginia schools are meeting the challenge by promoting increased physical activity. Schools across the Commonwealth are hosting events such as weekly Walk to School Days and Active School Days. Last October, more than 150 elementary schools across Virginia hosted Walk to School Days in their communities.
  • Karin Talbert Addison -"Addressing Obesity in the Commonwealth"

    1. 1. ADDRESSING OBESITY IN THE COMMONWEALTH Karin Addison Deputy Secretary of Education and Children’s Services
    2. 2. Survey Methodology Virginia Youth Survey • Assistance from CDC • Students ages 13 to 18 enrolled in high school grades 9 – 12 • Youth were surveyed in Fall 2011 • Provides comparison to other states and national data Virginia Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey • Formatted using CDC-validated survey questions • Students ages 10 to 16 enrolled middle school grades 6 – 8 • Youth were surveyed from September 2011 through May 2012 Next surveys will be administered in Fall 2013
    3. 3. Adult Obesity Virginia • 34.2 % of adults are overweight • 29.2 % of adults are obese
    4. 4. Adult Obesity MIDWEST WEST 24.3% 29% 29.5% SOUTH NORTHEAST 25.3%
    5. 5. Adult Obesity Virginia currently ranks 15th among the nation’s most obese states according to the Trust for America’s Health “F as in Fat” report.
    6. 6. Childhood Obesity • Over the past three decades, childhood obesity rates in America have tripled. • Today, nearly one in three children in America are overweight or obese. – Higher in African American and Hispanic communities, where nearly 40% of the children are overweight or obese. – Predicted that one-third of all children born in 2000 or later will suffer from diabetes at some point in their lives. – Many others will face chronic obesity-related health problems.
    7. 7. 2011 State Prevalence Among Low-Income Children Aged 2 to 4 years
    8. 8. Virginia High School Overweight/Obesity 2011 Virginia Youth Survey
    9. 9. Virginia High School Overweight/Obesity 1 out of 4 high school girls is considered overweight or obese. 1 out of 3 high school boys is considered overweight or obese. 2011 Virginia Youth Survey
    10. 10. Comparing Age Groups 12% Middle school Obesity prevalence 11% High school Obesity prevalence 2011 Virginia Youth Survey and 2012 Virginia Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey
    11. 11. Middle School Overweight and Obesity by Region 2010 Virginia Childhood Obesity Survey, VFHY
    12. 12. Virginia Youth Health Behaviors • Obesity is a multi-factoral problem • American lifestyles have drastically changed
    13. 13. Fruit and Vegetable Intake 83% of high school students did not eat the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables each day. 2011 Virginia Youth Survey
    14. 14. Physical Activity 24% of high school students met the recommended 60 minutes of physical activity each day. 2011 Virginia Youth Survey
    15. 15. Screen Time 77% of students reported MORE than two hours of total screen time per day. 2011 Virginia Youth Survey
    16. 16. Sugar Sweetened Beverages 1 out of 7 Virginia youth consume soda at least three times a day, increasing their chances of becoming obese by more than 60%. 2011 Virginia Youth Survey
    17. 17. Schools are part of the Solution Virginia public schools have been committed to improve health and to teach students the importance of practicing healthy behaviors.
    18. 18. Virginia Farm to School • 85.9 percent of school divisions have taken steps to serve meals featuring local foods. • Farm to School Week will take place from Nov. 11- Nov. 15
    19. 19. Healthy and Hunger Free Kids Act • More whole grains, fruits, and vegetables; low-fat milk dairy products; and less sodium and fat. • The right portion. Menus are planned for grades K-5, 6-8 and 9-12 and will demonstrate correct size portions. • Schools will be reimbursed an additional 6 cents for each lunch they serve in accordance with the new standards.
    20. 20. Healthier U.S. Schools Challenge • Establishes rigorous standards for schools' food quality, participation in meal programs, physical activity opportunities and nutrition education • 251 schools in nine different Virginia school districts have received awards.
    21. 21. Healthier U.S. Schools Challenge In addition to improved meal quality, many Virginia schools are meeting the challenge by promoting increased physical activity. • In addition to improved meal quality, many Virginia schools are meeting the challenge by promoting increased physical activity.
    22. 22. Future Directions The Virginia Youth Obesity survey provides valuable baseline obesity data.

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