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Getting CLOSE to the text to Read CLOSEly
To read well, that is to say, to read slowly, deeply, looking cautiously before ...
Getting CLOSE to the text to Read CLOSEly
Getting CLOSE to the text to Read CLOSEly
Annotating
Targeted Reading Skills:
ü Formulate questions in response to
text
ü ...
Getting CLOSE to the text to Read CLOSEly
Targeted Reading Skills:
ü Interpret and synthesize recurring
themes/ideas
ü Pos...
Getting CLOSE to the text to Read CLOSEly
Reading Focus - Author Techniques and Related Questions
Authors use a TECHNIQUE ...
Getting CLOSE to the text to Read CLOSEly
Mini-Rubrics to score student participation for Sharing Questions
When they ask ...
Getting CLOSE to the text to Read CLOSEly
Name_______________________________________________Date_______________Pd_______
...
Getting CLOSE to the text to Read CLOSEly
“O, here’s the shoe my baby wore,
But, baby, where are you?”
Dudley Randall, “Ba...
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Getting close to the text to read closely handout

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This handout was used for my Southern Regional Education Board Summer Session presentation. I presented methods of integrating literacy strategies and technology to engage students.

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Getting close to the text to read closely handout

  1. 1. Getting CLOSE to the text to Read CLOSEly To read well, that is to say, to read slowly, deeply, looking cautiously before and aft, with reservations, with doors left open, with delicate eyes and fingers … (Friedrich Nietzsche Preface to Daybreak, 1886) During this session we will discuss ways to.. ü group, annotate and converse with assigned text ü Today, we will read closely a poem and apply several literacy strategies to analyze the poem ü respond to Google Forms for assessment ü create Word Art that shows understanding of text ü post to Padlet.com to share knowledge during reading ü view images and connect them to text read ü create wikipages or blogposts to analyze text read ü publish an ePortfolio to display work ü publish a digital story that highlights theme and main ideas Resources for this session can be found here http://msbisonline.weebly.com/my-presentations.html Valerie R. Burton, M.Ed. eCard: http://About.me/VRBurton Presentations: http://MsBisOnline.Weebly.com/ Twitter: http://Twitter.com/MsBisOnline Google+: https://Plus.Google.com/+ValerieBurton/posts Facebook: http://www.Facebook.com/MsVRBurton PLN Blog: http://2Blog2Share2Learn.Edublogs.org/
  2. 2. Getting CLOSE to the text to Read CLOSEly
  3. 3. Getting CLOSE to the text to Read CLOSEly Annotating Targeted Reading Skills: ü Formulate questions in response to text ü Analyze and interpret elements of poetry or prose ü Draw conclusions and make inferences based on explicit (literal) and implicit (figurative) meaning Objective: read closely to determine the main idea or purpose of a text, the key information that supports it, and further clarify/illustrate main idea by connecting it to life. Learning experience: Learners will read and locate information of interest. Learners can highlight, underline, put questions in margins, etc. Student product: Text based notes to be used for writing, presenting or discussing Assessment: Teacher rubric, observation, essay or participation in discussion Rationale: Annotating a text is an effective strategy to promote active and critical reading skills by requiring students to read text and identify points of interest. These points of interest can either be teacher directed or student driven. Suggestions for annotating text can include labeling and interpreting literary devices; labeling and explaining the writer’s rhetorical devices and elements of style; or labeling the main ideas, supportive details and/or evidence that leads the reader to a conclusion about the text. There are many protocols/templates that can be used to help guide the annotation: D.I.D.L.S., D.I.T.S., D.U.C.A.T.S., S.M.E.L.L., S.O.A.P.S.Tone, S.O.L.L.I.D.D.D., T.A.P.S. Learning Log/Notebook Template Targeted Reading Skills: ü Condense or summarize ideas from one or more texts ü Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information ü Compare/contrast information from one or more texts ü Make text-to-text, text-to-self, and/or text-to-world connections Objective: read closely to determine literal and inferential meaning, determine central ideas and supporting details, and assess author’s point of view – while attending to and citing specific textual evidence. Learning experience: Learners will read and locate/synthesize information Student product: Text based notes to be used for writing, presenting or discussing Assessment: Teacher rubric, observation, essay or participation in discussion Rationale: Learning Logs and/or Note-taking Pages are useful when reading, listening or observing. Students can focus on thinking about a text or topic on the surface level and then at a deeper level with students providing evidence to support their interpretations. It requires students to engage by note taking, visually representing ideas, and recording ideas in writing. Self-generated Questions Objective: read text closely: attending to details, language, and perspective; posing and responding to text-dependent questions; and analyzing connections and relationships to deepen understanding. Learning experience: Learners will read and locate/synthesize information and create 6 questions. They will share questions with group and the group will submit 6 questions to be included on class quiz. Student product: Personal notes/questions and Group generated questions for quiz. Assessment: Teacher rubric, observation, and participation in discussion Rationale: Students pose questions about a text at different levels of
  4. 4. Getting CLOSE to the text to Read CLOSEly Targeted Reading Skills: ü Interpret and synthesize recurring themes/ideas ü Pose personally relevant questions about texts ü Relate new information to prior reading and/or experience by making text-to-text, text-to-self, and text-to- world connections comprehension and analysis. They share these questions and formulate answers to each other's questions based on their discussion. The questions should vary from "right there" questions, "think and search" questions, "author and you" questions, and "on my own" questions. Gist statements (#hashtags) Targeted Reading Skills: ü Condense or summarize ideas from one or more texts ü Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information ü Compare/contrast information from one or more texts ü Make text-to-text, text-to-self, and/or text-to-world connections Objective: Accurately paraphrase sentences, keeping original meaning, and changing the structure of the sentence if necessary Learning experience: Learners will read and locate/synthesize information and create a summary of 20-25 words. Student product: Summary and 5 #hashtags. Assessment: Teacher rubric and observation Rationale: These strategies help students identify the most important ideas in a text, put those ideas into their own words, and then make connections between among these important ideas. Students can be asked to summarize a text using established parameters. Gist statements call for a student to summarize text using a certain number of words and #Hashtag statements call for a text to be labeled by category or by internal feeling. Text Discussions Targeted Reading Skills: ü Draw conclusions and make inferences based on explicit and implied information ü Understand that one text may generate multiple interpretations Targeted Listening and Speaking Skills: ü Express a viewpoint and listen to others’ perspectives in order to reach consensus Objective: analyze plot, characters, themes, setting, and language of the text so that they are prepared to discuss and write about it. Learning experience: Learners will read and locate/synthesize information Student product: Discussion questions that will drive the conversation about the text. Assessment: Teacher rubric, observation, essay or participation in discussion Rationale: Discussions often help students gain a deeper understanding of text. In addition to requiring students to find textual evidence to support their claims, this strategy encourages students to express their own viewpoint while acknowledging their peers’ perspectives. These discussions explore ideas, values, and issues drawn from the assigned text. A successful seminar is focused on making meaning and not on mastering information. Close Reading can only be done if we require them to read with a purpose!!
  5. 5. Getting CLOSE to the text to Read CLOSEly Reading Focus - Author Techniques and Related Questions Authors use a TECHNIQUE to create their message. Examine the technique and then identify why it is important to the meaning of the text as a whole. What technique was used? Why was it used? How does it drive meaning? What? technique Why? was it used How? does it drive meaning Literary terms:  Similes  Metaphors  Personification  Figurative language  Symbols What is being compared? Why is the comparison effective? (typically because of the clear, strong, or unusual connection between the two) What symbols are present? Why did the author choose these symbols? Literary Terms used to make a point Analyze Dudley Randall’s use of language in Ballad of Birmingham, especially the figures of speech and syntax. How does he use language to convey his state of mind concerning the church burning/ civil rights movement? Word choice What word(s) stand out? Why? (typically vivid words, unusual choices, or a contrast to what a reader expects) How do particular words get us to look at characters or events in a particular way? Do they evoke an emotion? Did the author use nonstandard English or words in another language? Why? What is the effect? Are there any words that could have more than one meaning? Why might the author have played with language in this way? Language used to describe historical and cultural influences Describe major features of the language used in one specific group – occupational, ethnic, social, or age, etc. Indicate the purpose these features serve or what influences they reflect. Textual evidence to support a position Defend a position or one or more issues raised in the poem about the Civil Rights Movement. Tone and voice What one word describes the tone? Is the voice formal or informal? If it seems informal, how did the author make it that way? If it's formal, what makes it formal? Does the voice seem appropriate for the content? Language/Literary devices used to create tone Define Dudley Randall’s attitude toward the Civil Rights Movement and analyze how he uses language to convey this attitude. Sentence structure  Short sentence  Long sentences  Sentence fragments  Sentences in which word order is important  Questions What stands out about the way this sentence is written? Why did the author choose a short sentence here? (for example, so it stands out from sentences around it, for emphasis) Why did the author make this sentence really long? (for example, to convey the "on and on" sense of the experience.) Why did the author write a fragment here? (for example, for emphasis or to show a character's thoughts) Based on the order of the words in this sentence, which word do you think is the most important? Why? What was the author trying to show by placing a particular word in a certain place? Language used to influence theme, characterization, etc? Write an essay analyzing how language functions in the poem, Ballad of Birmingham by Dudley Randall and what it reveals about the characters or themes of the work as a whole.
  6. 6. Getting CLOSE to the text to Read CLOSEly Mini-Rubrics to score student participation for Sharing Questions When they ask questions, look for students to: 0 Ask simple or literal questions about the text  Ask questions about motivation and cause and effect + Ask questions about the logic of an argument and author’s purpose ++ Explain the basis for their questions when asked When they answer questions, look for students to: 0 Suggest literal answers or farfetched answers not related to the text  Suggest simple answers that make sense + Support answers with evidence from the text ++ Recognize when questions are resolved and when they require further exploration When they share notes or responses, look for students to: 0 State notes and responses and point out related passages in the text  Give simple reasons for notes and responses + Explain interpretations of passages noted ++ Explain inferences based on specific words and phrases When they respond to others’ comments, look for students to: 0 State their own unrelated comment  Agree or disagree with another’s comment + Give reasons for agreeing or disagreeing with another’s comment ++ Add to or challenge specific aspects of another’s idea Student Participation Record Record a plus (+), check (), or zero ( 0 ) for each student SharedInquiry discussion Sharingquestions Prereading Firstreading Secondreading Directed orinterpretivenotes Vocabulary Writing John Smith        Jack Holmes    + + + + + Boris Coleman + + +   
  7. 7. Getting CLOSE to the text to Read CLOSEly Name_______________________________________________Date_______________Pd_______ Dudley Randall, “Ballad of Birmingham” from Cities Burning (On the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama, 1963) “Mother dear, may I go downtown Instead of out to play, And march the streets of Birmingham In a Freedom March today?” “No, baby, no, you may not go, For the dogs are fierce and wild, And clubs and hoses, guns and jails Aren’t good for a little child.” “But, mother, I won’t be alone. Other children will go with me, And march the streets of Birmingham To make our country free.” “No, baby, no, you may not go, For I fear those guns will fire. But you may go to church instead And sing in the children’s choir.” She has combed and brushed her night-dark hair, And bathed rose petal sweet, And drawn white gloves on her small brown hands, And white shoes on her feet. The mother smiled to know her child Was in the sacred place, But that smile was the last smile To come upon her face. For when she heard the explosion, Her eyes grew wet and wild. She raced through the streets of Birmingham Calling for her child. She clawed through bits of glass and brick, Then lifted out a shoe.
  8. 8. Getting CLOSE to the text to Read CLOSEly “O, here’s the shoe my baby wore, But, baby, where are you?” Dudley Randall, “Ballad of Birmingham” from Cities Burning. Copyright © 1968 by Dudley Randall. Reprinted with the permission of the Estate of Dudley Randall. Source: Cities Burning (Broadside Press, 1968) Technique lang/lit? (line #) Importance? Gist Statement re: importance of techniques used 2 Hashtags

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