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SREB slides for presentation

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These slides were presented for the SREB 2014 Summer Session

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SREB slides for presentation

  1. 1. Using Tech Tools and Literacy Strategies to support Close Reading. Presented by Valerie R. Burton, M.Ed. @MsBisOnline
  2. 2. Valerie R. Burton, M.Ed. Classroom teacher for 17.5 years Professional Development Coach and Department Chair Currently teaching A. P. Literature, English III, and English IV at West Jefferson High School in Harvey, LA. (suburb of New Orleans) Mother of 2 Morrah 12 Nathaniel 22 *(today)
  3. 3. Brief description: Practice using a variety of Literacy Strategies and tech tools aimed to help students become purposeful, active readers who are in control of their own reading comprehension. CCSS encourages students to connect to text and this presentation is geared to demonstrate how to use strategies that will help students to connect with text and improve text comprehension. Strand: Best Practices Literacy Strategies 1. Anticipation guides - B 2. Vocabulary support - B 3. Annotating - D 4. Summarizing - D & A 5. Notetaking templates D & A 6. Self-generated questions D & A B=Before D=During and A=After
  4. 4. To read well, that is to say, to read slowly, deeply, looking cautiously before and aft, with reservations, with doors left open, with delicate eyes and fingers … (Friedrich Nietzsche Preface to Daybreak, 1886)
  5. 5. Extensive reading & skimming are essential dimensions of reading text. Close reading, reading carefully, slowly, with ‘delicate eyes and fingers’, is what really matters.
  6. 6. I will define and demonstrate the literacy strategies I will define and demonstrate technology tools and resources We (You) will discuss AND USE literacy strategies to analyze the poem “Ballad of Birmingham” by Dudley Randall using ●Google Forms ●Paper ●PBWorks wiki ●Padlet post-it wall
  7. 7. Literacy Strategies #Anticipation guides #Vocabulary support #Annotating #Summarizing #Notetaking templates #Self-generated questions
  8. 8. Integrate technology and increase engagement by using literacy strategies and ….. 1. Google Docs for collaboration, Google Forms to gather information 2. Wordle.net for presentations and assessment 3. Padlet.com to gather ideas and resources 4. PicLit.com (and other image sources) that relate to text 5. Weebly.com for ePortfolios and easy websites 6. Kidblog.org or Edublogs.org for student blogs 7. PBWorks.com for collaborating and presenting
  9. 9. In order for students to become college and career ready, they must learn to read and comprehend complex texts independently and proficiently. To develop these skills, students must be presented with many opportunities to read and re-read complex, layered texts and be provided with numerous strategies and activities.
  10. 10. •Are we asking them to perform a task that requires them to examine, analyze, synthesize, manipulate, mash-up, or rework the text? •Do they have to discuss, write, publish, produce or create something?
  11. 11. Using short passages and excerpts Diving right into the text with limited pre- reading activities Focusing on the text itself Rereading deliberately Reading with a pencil Noticing things that are confusing Discussing the text with others Responding to text-dependent questions
  12. 12. Scaffolding is very important This student works with others to complete a puzzle. Each of them is given a bag of pieces that they organize and then SHARE.
  13. 13. Scaffolding requires us to break up the reading process into bite-size pieces and then give students the utensils, tools, or structures needed to devour each bite. Discuss key vocabulary GIST statements Annotating
  14. 14. •We are not going to HARD WORK but… •I want you to see what it will look like when you use the strategies in your class.
  15. 15. Anticipation guides (or Opinionnaires) involve giving students a list of statements about the topic to be studied and asking them to respond to it before reading and learning, and then again after reading and learning. While the opinionnaire works well with ideas that are open to debate and discussion, the anticipation guide strategy is better suited to information that is verifiable.
  16. 16. Generate interest in the theme or plot
  17. 17. Discuss the results
  18. 18. Brief Description: These strategies help students make new words ‘their own.’ Teaching vocabulary is an essential component of standards-based curriculum alignment. Making the critical words second nature to our students will enhance achievement on assessments and will be useful in college and their career.
  19. 19. There are many ways to support vocabulary acquisition 1.Scavenger Hunt 2.Cloze Reading 3.Password Game 4.Context clues 5.Charade 6.Frayer Model Vocabulary teaching boils down to two critical concepts. 1.Meaningful use— multiple opportunities to use new words in reading, writing and soon discussion. 2.Integration— connecting new vocabulary to prior knowledge
  20. 20. Macbeth Vocabulary Words Minion-a submissive follower or dependent; slave Duncan’s minion relayed the news that that the Scottish forces were victorious. First I show my students the sentence and ask them to define it using context clues. Next, I have them check their guess against the definition.
  21. 21. Students complete a story summary by filling in the blanks of this cloze reading passage with the appropriate vocabulary word.
  22. 22. The Frayer Model is graphical organizer used for word analysis and vocabulary building. This four-square model prompts students to think about and describe the meaning of a word or concept by 1.Defining the term, 2.Describing its essential characteristics, 3.Providing examples of the idea, and 4.Offering non-examples of the idea.
  23. 23. Annotating Brief description: Students closely examine written or visual text and make personal and meaningful connections via comments or explanations. Students read text and identify points of interest in a fiction or nonfiction text. These points of interest can either be teacher or student driven/directed.
  24. 24. College ready students must be able to connect to text. Have them to read and annotate an article. ●Summarize ●Make predictions ●Formulate opinions (agree or disagree with the author) ●Make connections ●Ask questions (Clarify/ Connect/ Conclude) ●Analyze author’s point of view (tone, diction, syntax) ●Write reflections/ reactions/ comments
  25. 25. Marking up an article does not need to happen with pen and paper only. This is a pdf that I highlighted and left comments on as example of how annotating can be done online. Diigo and Evernote can also be used to annotate online.
  26. 26. What do you want them to focus on? What do you want them to know? Feel free to have them look at ALL or SOME of the elements
  27. 27. •Details: that have a definite effect. Think about why the author includes these details. Note the importance of the details in the margin. •Word Choice: Do the words bring to mind positive or negative feelings? What emotions do the words suggest? Is there a pattern to the kinds of words the author uses? What does the author want to convey through those word choices? Make sure to comment on the effect in the margins. •Imagery: Words or phrases appealing to the senses—and write comments about the effect of the imagery in the margin. What does this image bring to mind? What emotions are stirred by the images? •Comparisons: Similes, metaphors, personification—and briefly note the effect of the comparison. What is the similarity between the two objects being compared? What understanding is created through the comparison? •Point of view: Does the perspective from which the story or information is presented have an effect on how the emotions or understanding? Write comments in the margin. •Repetition: What is the author trying to emphasize through repeated ideas, images, or words and phrases? •Shifts: Note changes in tone, point of view, verb tense—anything that changes the overall pattern. Write comments in the margin.
  28. 28. I will read Ballad of Birmingham (1st Read) Feel free to annotate ANYthing that you find of interest. ANYthing
  29. 29. •Imagery: Words or phrases appealing to the senses—and write comments about the effect of the imagery in the margin. What does this image bring to mind? What emotions are stirred by the images? •Point of view: Does the perspective from which the story or information is presented have an effect on how the emotions or understanding? Write comments in the margin.
  30. 30. Brief description: GISTing is an excellent strategy for helping students paraphrase and summarize essential information. Students are required to limit the gist of a sentence/ paragraph to a set number of words. Students read text and create individual summary sentences from a paragraph. These sentences are condensed until the students create a gist that must contain only the predetermined number of words.
  31. 31. They can use templates like this one to help them to visualize what it looks like to create a 25 word summary sentence regarding text. Give them a template to use ORRR have them create #hashtags
  32. 32. What is a #hashtag? The # symbol is called a hashtag and it is used to mark keywords or topics in a microblogging forum.
  33. 33. 1. Read the text. 2. Identify the 5Ws and H. •Who: •What: •Where: •When: •Why: •How: 3. Write a 25-word GIST. 4. Create a hashtag It is difficult to create a summary of exactly twenty- five words because this wonderful technique requires the student to separate the important from the non-important.
  34. 34. Consider the Who? is doing What? Where? When? Why? and How? What are the big ideas? #analyze the author’s intent #evaluate how the author made you feel #summarize what is happening
  35. 35. Brief description: Notebook Templates (dialectical journals) allow students to self-monitor as they read and learn. These templates can lead to an increase in attention, comprehension, and achievement.
  36. 36. •Details: that have a definite effect. Think about why the author includes these details. Note the importance of the details in the margin. •Word Choice: Do the words bring to mind positive or negative feelings? What emotions do the words suggest? Is there a pattern to the kinds of words the author uses? What does the author want to convey through those word choices? Make sure to comment on the effect in the margins. •Imagery: Words or phrases appealing to the senses—and write comments about the effect of the imagery in the margin. What does this image bring to mind? What emotions are stirred by the images? •Comparisons: Similes, metaphors, personification—and briefly note the effect of the comparison. What is the similarity between the two objects being compared? What understanding is created through the comparison? •Point of view: Does the perspective from which the story or information is presented have an effect on how the emotions or understanding? Write comments in the margin. •Repetition: What is the author trying to emphasize through repeated ideas, images, or words and phrases? •Shifts: Note changes in tone, point of view, verb tense—anything that changes the overall pattern. Write comments in the margin.
  37. 37. Notebook Template Sample
  38. 38. Brief Description: Students generate higher-level questions that address issues of interpretation and analysis as they read. When students, rather than the teacher, ask questions of the text, they begin the process of critical thinking and connect with the text more fully.
  39. 39. LEVEL ONE: READING ON THE LINE FOR RECALL QUESTIONS •As students read, they are mentally asking questions that can be answered by explicit information they can physically point out in the passage. LEVEL TWO: READING BETWEEN THE LINES FOR INTERPRETIVE QUESTIONS •Students make interpretations based upon details in the text. LEVEL THREE: READING BEYOND THE LINES FOR UNIVERSAL MEANING QUESTIONS •Students move beyond the text to connect to universal meaning.
  40. 40. LEVEL ONE: READING ON THE LINE FOR RECALL QUESTIONS 1) Question: What does Dee think about orchids? 2) Question: How does Maggie walk? LEVEL TWO: READING BETWEEN THE LINES FOR INTERPRETIVE QUESTIONS 1) Question: How is the orchid the narrator wishes her daughter would give her symbolic of their relationship? 2) Question: How is the narrator different from the person Dee wishes her to be? LEVEL THREE: READING BEYOND THE LINES FOR UNIVERSAL MEANING QUESTIONS 1) Question: How does television impact the way we view family relationships? 2) Question: What is a “good” mother?
  41. 41. Showcasing work This is wiki houses student responses to literature circle jobs. They were Discussion Leader, Vocabulary Builder, Symbol Tracker Theme Tracker, Character Tracker, and Extender.
  42. 42. Connecting to Vocabulary
  43. 43. Creating 4x4s Create a 4 x 4 summary of what we have read so far. A literary 4 x 4 summary is creating a literary analysis using 4 sentences that contain 4 words in each sentence. Re-visit the text and your notes and construct mini- poems that delve into the themes, events, characters, historic surroundings, etc. of the text. Here is a link to the assignment blog post. Directions
  44. 44. We will be connecting visual text to our written text Your mission is to select an image that relates to the text and support your choice with textual evidence.
  45. 45. We have been given the charge of covering the literacy standards across the curriculum. Everyone is a literacy teacher. This presentation demonstrates activities that can be used to engage students.
  46. 46. Anchor: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
  47. 47. Key Ideas and Details R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the visual or written text. R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a visual or written text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. R.3 Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course of a visual or written text. Craft and Structure R.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a visual or written text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word or image choices shape meaning or tone. R.5 Analyze the structure of visual or written texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. R.6 Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a visual or written text. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas R.7 Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words. R.8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a visual or written text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. R.9 Analyze how two or more visual or written texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity R.10 Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.
  48. 48. Text Types and Purposes W.1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. W.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. W.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details and well-structured event sequences. Production and Distribution of Writing W.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. W.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. W.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others. Research to Build and Present Knowledge W.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. W.8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism. W.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. Range of Writing W.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences
  49. 49. Comprehension and Collaboration SL.1 Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. SL.2 Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. SL.3 Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric. Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas SL.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. SL.5 Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations. SL.6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.
  50. 50. Contact me if you need me I am an English Language Arts teacher from New Orleans, Louisiana who looks for all opportunities to integrate technology into my classroom. I blog. http://2blog2share2learn.edublogs.org/ I tweet. http://twitter.com/MsBisOnline I share. http://msbisonline.weebly.com/ Need to contact me? MsVRBurton@gmail.com or MsBpresents@gmail.com (504) 298-9764 about.me/VRBurton – myself about.me/BurtonsScholars – my class

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