Writing To Learn
Writing To Learn… <ul><li>Engages students in recording information </li></ul><ul><li>Making connections </li></ul><ul><li...
Four Attitudes of Content Area Writing  (Scarborough 2001) <ul><li>Does not have to be graded </li></ul><ul><li>Does not h...
Student Benefits of Writing To Learn <ul><li>Organize and clarify thoughts </li></ul><ul><li>Find out what they know and d...
Teacher Benefits of Writing To Learn <ul><li>Assess prior and subsequent knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Assess how students o...
Reasons To Write! <ul><li>Inform </li></ul><ul><li>Persuade </li></ul><ul><li>Entertain  </li></ul><ul><li>Reflect </li></ul>
Writing To Inform <ul><li>When you are writing to inform, you are sharing what you know about a topic or subject with anot...
Writing To Persuade <ul><li>When you write to persuade, you want to convince someone else to do or think the way you do. W...
Writing To Entertain <ul><li>When you write to entertain, it is usually creative, or includes humor – it’s meant to bring ...
Writing to Reflect <ul><li>When you write to reflect, you explore, clarify, and think deeply about the concepts and ideas ...
What Is Reflective Writing? <ul><li>It is not necessarily the publishing of a formal writing piece </li></ul><ul><li>Stude...
Quickwrites As a Form of  Reflective Writing <ul><li>What are Quickwrites? </li></ul><ul><li>A form of impromptu writing t...
Quickwrites cont. <ul><li>Why use Quickwrites? </li></ul><ul><li>Provides students with a means of quickly representing th...
Types of Quickwrites <ul><li>Journal Writing </li></ul><ul><li>Dialogue Journals </li></ul><ul><li>Double Entry Journals <...
Journal Quickwrites <ul><li>Cognitive Activities in Journal Entries  (things to put in your journal) </li></ul><ul><li>Obs...
To Do!!  Quickwrite Passport Task <ul><li>Use a blog to do a Quickwrite </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt(s) should be tied to a co...
Dialogue Boards As  Writing To Learn <ul><li>This assessment focuses on students interacting with the prompt and/or each o...
Dialogue Boards cont… <ul><li>As a reflection on learning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>State one or two facts that you did not kn...
Format of Dialogue Boards <ul><li>Interactive </li></ul><ul><li>Focused on one activity or prompt </li></ul><ul><li>Meant ...
Creating A Dialogue Board Refer to the Podcast under  “Tutorials”
Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy <ul><li>Asking students to think at higher levels, beyond simple recall, is an excellent way to s...
To Think About… <ul><li>As you review the Revised Bloom’s tutorial, consider how the levels of thinking align with the GLC...
Congratulations! <ul><li>You have completed the overview of Writing to Learn.  Remember to… </li></ul><ul><li>check the Pa...
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Writing To Learn

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Writing To Learn

  1. 1. Writing To Learn
  2. 2. Writing To Learn… <ul><li>Engages students in recording information </li></ul><ul><li>Making connections </li></ul><ul><li>Exploring ideas without necessarily publishing a formal writing piece </li></ul><ul><li>Allows for reflection </li></ul><ul><ul><li>See what they’ve learned </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>See what they’ve accomplished </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Look to the future </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Four Attitudes of Content Area Writing (Scarborough 2001) <ul><li>Does not have to be graded </li></ul><ul><li>Does not have to be a finished product </li></ul><ul><li>Can be a stepping stone to more formal writing </li></ul><ul><li>Provides a way to interact with a literary work or content materials in order to gain greater understanding </li></ul>
  4. 4. Student Benefits of Writing To Learn <ul><li>Organize and clarify thoughts </li></ul><ul><li>Find out what they know and don’t know </li></ul><ul><li>Make personal connections to the content </li></ul><ul><li>Generate new ideas, thoughts and observations </li></ul><ul><li>Hypothesize without the fear of being wrong </li></ul><ul><li>Reflect on own thought process </li></ul><ul><li>Summarize what they have learned </li></ul><ul><li>Open a channel of communication with others </li></ul>
  5. 5. Teacher Benefits of Writing To Learn <ul><li>Assess prior and subsequent knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Assess how students organize and express ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Communicate with students one-on-one </li></ul><ul><li>Provide individual learning supports that allow students to develop writing-to-learn skills </li></ul>
  6. 6. Reasons To Write! <ul><li>Inform </li></ul><ul><li>Persuade </li></ul><ul><li>Entertain </li></ul><ul><li>Reflect </li></ul>
  7. 7. Writing To Inform <ul><li>When you are writing to inform, you are sharing what you know about a topic or subject with another person. When you write to inform, you want to do the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Think about what the person you are writing to already knows about the topic. </li></ul><ul><li>Think about what the person you are writing to needs to learn about the topic or subject. </li></ul><ul><li>Put your information in logical order. </li></ul><ul><li>Use examples, definitions, and descriptions to make the information clear to your reader. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Writing To Persuade <ul><li>When you write to persuade, you want to convince someone else to do or think the way you do. When you write to persuade you want to do the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Decide what your position or stand is on the topic or subject. </li></ul><ul><li>Think of the reasons for that stand or position. </li></ul><ul><li>Think about the possible position or stand of the person you are writing to. </li></ul><ul><li>Organize the reasons for your position or stand. </li></ul><ul><li>Invite your reader to understand and share your position or stand. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Writing To Entertain <ul><li>When you write to entertain, it is usually creative, or includes humor – it’s meant to bring a smile to the reader’s face. When you write to entertain, you want to do the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Open your story in an interesting or different way </li></ul><ul><li>Be sure your writing remains clear, precise, lively and interesting </li></ul><ul><li>Work out an interesting theme before you write </li></ul><ul><li>Use precise sensory description </li></ul><ul><li>Never describe for the sake… of describing </li></ul>
  10. 10. Writing to Reflect <ul><li>When you write to reflect, you explore, clarify, and think deeply about the concepts and ideas encountered in reading. When you write to reflect, you do the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Think using background knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Use a different language to communicate what you have learned </li></ul><ul><li>Construct your own meaning of the learned material and transcribe it to paper </li></ul><ul><li>Link new information with prior knowledge by sharing analogies </li></ul><ul><li>Respond critically or personally to what you are reading or learning </li></ul>
  11. 11. What Is Reflective Writing? <ul><li>It is not necessarily the publishing of a formal writing piece </li></ul><ul><li>Students engage in: </li></ul><ul><li>Recording information </li></ul><ul><li>Making connections </li></ul><ul><li>Exploring ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Allowing for reflection </li></ul><ul><li>Students see what they have learned and accomplished as well as look to the future </li></ul>
  12. 12. Quickwrites As a Form of Reflective Writing <ul><li>What are Quickwrites? </li></ul><ul><li>A form of impromptu writing that is an unpolished piece in which the writer responds to a stimulus. The stimulus can be a literary piece, content article, experiment, problem or scenario. Use to help students quickly put ideas, understandings and learnings down on paper. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Quickwrites cont. <ul><li>Why use Quickwrites? </li></ul><ul><li>Provides students with a means of quickly representing their thinking. Most important is simply responding to the prompt in a personal way without regard to conventions. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Types of Quickwrites <ul><li>Journal Writing </li></ul><ul><li>Dialogue Journals </li></ul><ul><li>Double Entry Journals </li></ul><ul><li>Constructed Response </li></ul><ul><li>Extended Response </li></ul><ul><li>Refer to the “Tutorials” in module 5 for a video segment depicting Dialogue Journals </li></ul>
  15. 15. Journal Quickwrites <ul><li>Cognitive Activities in Journal Entries (things to put in your journal) </li></ul><ul><li>Observations : describing what is visible, summarizing and interpreting details, or recalling key ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Questioning : formulating and recording personal doubts, points of confusion, validity of information, and/or how things are done </li></ul><ul><li>Speculation : free to wonder about the meaning of events, issues, facts, readings, interpretations, problems and solutions </li></ul><ul><li>Self-Awareness : become conscious about what they stand for and how they are different from others </li></ul><ul><li>Digression : departs from the subject to connect to something that “comes to mind” </li></ul><ul><li>Synthesis : Organize ideas and find relations and connections between topics </li></ul>
  16. 16. To Do!! Quickwrite Passport Task <ul><li>Use a blog to do a Quickwrite </li></ul><ul><li>Prompt(s) should be tied to a content area </li></ul><ul><li>Time limit should be 3-5 minutes </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage students to respond to each other’s blog </li></ul><ul><li>Be prepared to supply the URL or show your blog in order to validate your passport </li></ul>
  17. 17. Dialogue Boards As Writing To Learn <ul><li>This assessment focuses on students interacting with the prompt and/or each other. It can be used: </li></ul><ul><li>As on-going data gathering activity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ex: What genres of literature have your read this year? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What reading strategy did you use with today’s assignment? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>To activate prior knowledge and experiences </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What are you a science/math/social studies etc. “expert” at? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Explain a time you experienced prejudice. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>For dialogue between students based on opinion statements </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Do you think it is ever right for people to disobey authority? Explain your reasoning. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Should all endangered animals be saved? </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. Dialogue Boards cont… <ul><li>As a reflection on learning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>State one or two facts that you did not know about your topic before beginning your I-search report. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Retell the process for adding fractions with unlike denominators. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>To assess what students know about a topic </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What do you know about photosynthesis? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What is the difference between a fact and an opinion? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>To make a connection to the theme of the unit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Respond to the theme: Facing A Challenge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Respond to the topic: Change </li></ul></ul>
  19. 19. Format of Dialogue Boards <ul><li>Interactive </li></ul><ul><li>Focused on one activity or prompt </li></ul><ul><li>Meant to encourage participation by all </li></ul><ul><li>Publishes opinions or thoughts without acknowledging the author </li></ul>
  20. 20. Creating A Dialogue Board Refer to the Podcast under “Tutorials”
  21. 21. Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy <ul><li>Asking students to think at higher levels, beyond simple recall, is an excellent way to stimulate students’ thought processes. Different types of questions require us to use different kinds or different levels of thinking. </li></ul><ul><li>According to Bloom’s Taxonomy, human thinking skills can be broken down into six categories. </li></ul>
  22. 22. To Think About… <ul><li>As you review the Revised Bloom’s tutorial, consider how the levels of thinking align with the GLCE’s in your content area. </li></ul><ul><li>The hyperlink under the “Tutorial” section of Module 5 gives an in-depth explanation of the revisions to Bloom’s Taxonomy. </li></ul>
  23. 23. Congratulations! <ul><li>You have completed the overview of Writing to Learn. Remember to… </li></ul><ul><li>check the Passport Tasks to be completed for certification </li></ul><ul><li>use the resources and tutorials available under Module 5 </li></ul>

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