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© Wolff Olins   Page 1
OUR PROPOSITION IS ARTICULATED
AROUND ONE PRINCIPLE:
IN A WORLD WHERE WHAT YOU DO IS
MORE IMPORTANT THAN WHAT YOU SAY,
WE AIM TO CREATE BETTER REALITIES,
NOT JUST A NICER IMAGE.




© Wolff Olins                        Page 2
AMBITIOUS
FOR CLIENTS
OPTIMISTIC
FOR THE WORLD

© Wolff Olins
We help companies invent, not predict,
the future. In this world, we’re ambitious
for clients.

We think the future will be better
than the past. We believe in progress.
We’re optimistic for the world.

What we do is create brands, redefine
and reinvent existing brands, and increasingly
create brand-led product, service and
experience innovation.

This helps our clients become something
unique. Not one of many, but one of one.



© Wolff Olins
WE HELP YOU EXPAND YOUR
AMBITION THROUGH A BOLDER
BRAND-LED STRATEGY.
WE HELP YOU CREATE BETTER
PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
THROUGH BRAND-LED INNOVATION.
WE USE THE POWER OF BRAND
TO DELIVER TRANSFORMATION
INSIDE YOUR ORGANIZATION.
AND WE HELP YOU TAKE YOUR PLACE
IN THE WORLD THROUGH A STRONGER
BRAND EXPRESSION.




© Wolff Olins
SOME OF THE WAYS
IN WHICH WE’VE HELPED
OUR CLIENTS




Brand idea-inspired                                                                                                            Since launching the new
85 new “Imagination                                                                                                            brand in 2007, NYC tourism
Breakthroughs,” creating        In the first four months after the launch, the museum                                          has increased by 5% and
$25 billion in additional       attracted a 600% surge in visitors and 400% boom in                                            tourism spending by
revenues.                       new members.                                                                                   13.31%.
                                                                                                                                                               Every Unilever business,
                                                                                                                                                               from China to Argentina,
                                                                                                                                                               embraced the brand idea of
                                                                                                                                                               adding vitality to life. The
                                                                                                                                                               idea continues to be used
                                                                                                                                                               to determine which
                                                                                                                                                               businesses to invest in,
                                                                                                 Helping Target deliver more                                   which to exit from, and
                                                                                                 Targetness through                                            where to innovate (almost
                                                                                                 a simpler architecture                                        €1 billion a year is spent on
                                                                                                 and new product brands.                                       vitality-driven innovation).
                                                                                                                                                               The new vitality-inspired
                                Created new business offer                                                                                                     Knorr Vie drink has sold
                                that helped Mercedes                                                                                                           over 60 million bottles.
                                extend its brand beyond                                                                                                        By June 2008 Unilever was
                                automotive and into                                                                                                            achieving an underlying
                                services.                                                                                                                      sales growth close to 8%.


From the day it opened,
London’s Tate Modern was                                       In its first five years, Orange
a huge success, attracting                                     attracted a huge and                                            Within the UK, brand
double its target visitor                                      unusually loyal customer                                        recognition has already
numbers and becoming the                                       base of 7 million people.                                       reached 85% and globally,
most popular art gallery in                                    Year after year, Orange                                         recognition is over 50%.
the world. After a year,                                       scored highest of the                                           Sponsorship exceeded
Tate’s overall annual visitor                                  mobile networks on                                              expectations with partners
numbers had risen 87% to                                       customer satisfaction, and        Created a new business        spending more than €400
7.5 million. As the wrote in                                   lowest (less than 15%) on         model and raised $100         million in the first year and
May 2005, Tate “has                                            churn. By the time France         million to combat AIDS in     the 2012 Olympic games          Created a new online social
changed the way that            Sony Ericsson increased its    Telecom bought the                Africa, Inspi(RED) is the     are setting records for         commerce experience to
Britain sees art, and the       income by 139% to €362         business, it was worth an         biggest-selling t-shirt in    generating more money           transform the UK’s largest
way the world sees Britain.”    million.                       astonishing €25 billion           Gap history.                  than any previous games.        home shopping retailer.
AOL:
RENEWED
NOT MORE OF THE SAME
Wolff Olins have been working with AOL in translating this
vision into an innovative new brand platform for their business.
Deliberately disruptive, deliberately unlike what is being done
by other media businesses. because the media world of today
is entirely unlike the media world of yesterday.
Today’s media world is not broadcast, it is discovered in
fragmented, messy, non-linear, niche conversations. It is a
world where AOL already has over 80m unique users engaging
with every possible flavor of content from Gothic nightclubs to
Tiger Woods’ driving skills.
Under these circumstances, how a brand behaves matters
much more than old-fashioned pre-conceptions of identity.
READY TO DISRUPT
Our job was not to make things more consistent, but instead
to disrupt accepted web 2.0 conventions by creating a
platform that embraces fragmentation, sharing and non-
linear pathways into content.
Because AOL is content, the brand has to be like content:
fluid, flexible, and changeable. It exists as a host for new
innovations and new content experiences.




© Wolff Olins
© Wolff Olins
MERCEDES-BENZ:
10 MONTHS, 3 NEW BUSINESSES
GROWING A GLOBAL ICON
In 2007, Daimler set up a team of senior executives to develop new
growth initiatives beyond the world of cars. Having identified the
brand as one of the most important assets to leverage, the Business
Innovation team approached Wolff Olins to help develop appropriate
businesses to generated new and profitable growth without putting
one of the world’s most iconic brands at risk.

FROM IDEAS TO REALITY
Wolff Olins developed a brand-led innovation framework that ensures
that each venture protects the Mercedes-Benz brand, leverages what
is tangibly special about it (e.g., German engineering), gives the brand
new relevance in the world (attracting younger customers and
building new sustainability credentials) and makes money (with a
return on sales of 20% or more). Working with Daimler’s Business
Innovation team and the leaders of the business in UK, US, China and
Japan, we developed ten new businesses to pilot. In January 2009
(ten months after the commencement of the project), Daimler
launched solutions for family mobility at the Mercedes-Benz brand
centre in Surrey UK.

A PLATFORM FOR GROWTH
Kinderclass has already led to a significant increase in the sale of
child safety accessories and continues to attract younger families to
the Mercedes-Benz brand. Later in 2009, a new high profile venture
and an exclusive travel service will be launched in the UK and China,
respectively. Wolff Olins continues to provide advice and creative
assistance as other products and services are being developed and
launched around the world.




© Wolff Olins                                                              Page 10
(RED)
EMBRACING CONSCIOUS
COMMERCE
AMBITION
(RED)’s ambition was to harness the power of the world’s greatest
companies to help eliminate AIDS in Africa. To do this, it created both
a new business model and a new brand model to achieve three goals:
deliver a source of sustainable income for the Global Fund, provide
consumers with a choice that makes giving effortless and last but not
least, generate profits and a sense of purpose for partner companies.

ACTION
The first challenge was to get the all-important founding partners
on board. So we helped Bobby Shriver and Bono paint a vision of what
(RED) could be. This vision of the future provoked Amex, Converse,
Emporio Armani and Gap to take the plunge.

We built the brand around the idea that (RED) inspires, connects
and gives consumers power, with a unique brand architecture that
unites participating businesses by literally embracing their logos
to the power (RED). Many partners have gone the extra mile and
manufactured products or packaging in African countries, generating
jobs and opportunities for local people.

IMPACT
Within the first five weeks of the US launch, the (RED) brand
registered 30% unaided awareness. Over 1.35 million people watched
a YouTube video showing the impact and there are over 850,000 (RED)
friends on MySpace. In its first two years, (RED) partners delivered
$108 million to the Global Fund, more than most countries donated in
the same period. This is enough money to give 650,000 people life-
saving drugs for a year.




© Wolff Olins
2012 OLYMPIC GAMES
AMBITION
London’s bid for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games was like no
other. It promised to inspire the youth of the world. To engage, involve
and enthuse – to change lives. It promised to put the Olympic and
Paralympic Games at the heart of contemporary life. To achieve this,
London’s Organizing Committee needed a powerful brand, one that
could inspire and engage with a global audience of four billion
people. A brand that could make the Olympic and Paralympic Games
more relevant, accessible and inspiring than ever.

ACTION
We worked with London’s Organizing Committee to define a clear
ambition for London 2012. These Games were to be everyone’s. They
would call on people to challenge themselves – to try new things, to
go further, to discover new abilities. The brand we created supports
this ambition. The emblem is 2012, an instantly recognizable symbol
and a universal form – one already closely associated with the
Games in London. It is unconventionally bold, deliberately spirited
and unexpectedly dissonant, echoing London’s qualities of a modern,
edgy city. Containing neither sporting images nor pictures of London
landmarks, the emblem shows that the Games is more than London,
more than sport. It is for everyone, regardless of age, culture and
language. It is designed to be populated, to contain infills and
images, so it is recognizable enough for everyone to feel and be part
of London 2012.

IMPACT
The ambition – everyone’s – is already shaping London 2012.
For the first time the Olympic and Paralympic Games will share the
same brand, using their own variant of the emblem. And in another
first, the Cultural Olympiad will be able to share the brand. New
technology is being put in place to get everyone closer to the action
and more deeply involved. Digital media will be used to create a
Games in which everyone can play a part wherever they are. The
brand we created will shape the experience of 2012. It will take the
Games beyond sport, creating wider interest and even greater
inspiration. It will create a Games for everyone.




© Wolff Olins                                                              Page 14
NYC:
THE UNBRANDABLE CITY
UNIFIED,NOT UNIFORM
There’s only one New York City. But within that one city are five
boroughs, approximately 191 neighborhoods, nearly a million
buildings and over 8.2 million people. Each individual has their own
New York.

Within the mind of every single New Yorker resides a different version
of New York City. It’s a city loved in 138 different languages and
viewed through an almost infinite mix of cultures, ideologies and
ways of life. Everyone living side-by-side.

This kaleidoscopic quality is one of the greatest things about this city.
It’s the very thing we love. But it also makes it difficult to represent.
There is no one symbol, no one logo or brand that means New York
City to everyone.

CAPTURE THE ESSENCE
To create a brand for New York City, the challenge was not to define a
purpose, but to capture an essence. This was articulated by the idea:
“only one, but no one NYC.”

The resulting brand identity has now been embraced not just by
New York City’s official marketing, tourism and partnership
organization, NYC & Company, but across many City departments.

ONE CITY, ONE BRAND
From what was once many disparate and confusing identities,
the NYC brand has become the singular strong voice for the City,
clearly articulated. Tourism revenues rose and the first international
advertising campaign has launched, bringing this rigorous brand
to a global audience.




© Wolff Olins                                                               Page 15
TARGET:
UP&UP
AMBITION
In 2006, Target came to Wolff Olins with the challenge of creating an
architecture for their own brand portfolio that would enable them to
achieve a new level of growth.

Our work led to a range of recommendations to simplify and upgrade
Target’s own brands. One of the central insights was that Target
had the opportunity to re-energize their presence in everyday items
by creating a new, vibrant brand that would directly appeal to their
female guests’ needs. The ambition was to create a new brand
spanning all Target products in cleaning, beauty, personal care and
pharmacy, that would drive growth by creating new levels of guest
loyalty and purchase frequency.

ACTION
We worked with Target senior management to define how the
essence of the Target brand should be applied to its own brands. We
conducted both quantitative and qualitative analysis to understand
the competitive landscape, consumer needs and Target’s unique
advantages.

The key insight uncovered that no retailer was providing consumables
that deliver on the three core customer needs of value, ease and
connection, a position that Target was able to own. These learnings
led to the strategy of bringing a helpful, positive attitude to daily
purchases, and the brand name of Up&Up, brought to life through
new packaging design, messaging strategies and online strategies.

IMPACT
Up&Up launched in April 2009 with suncare products and is now
launched in diapers, baby formula, shampoo, cleaning products and
other household goods. “We believe that it will stand out on the shelf,
and is so distinctive that we’ll get new guests that will want to try it
that maybe didn’t even notice the Target brand before,” said Kathee
Tesija, executive vice president of merchandising for Target. Initial
sales results have exceeded expectations and garnered considerable
media and consumer interest. We look forward to tracking its
continued success as it expands into new categories.


© Wolff Olins
UNILEVER:
ADDING VITALITY
TO BUSINESS
AMBITION
Unilever is big. 150 million times a day, in 150 countries, people
choose to make Unilever brands part of their lives. But in the
consumer goods industry, growth is hard. Unilever decided that
it was too diffuse, with too many brands and with no unifying driver
of growth. Unilever wanted to become a single-minded, idea-led
growth business.

ACTION
Wolff Olins helped Unilever change, from an invisible owner of
brands to a much more visible business, leading its brands through
a single idea: “adding vitality to life.” We created a visual identity
that expresses “Vitality” and that is starting to appear on every
Unilever product. Under this banner, we also worked on dozens of
projects to put vitality at the heart of the organization – from
designing workplaces to transforming the recruitment process t
o training employees how to pass on the stories that underlie the idea.
And we’ve helped Unilever invent new products and projects that
deliver vitality.

IMPACT
Since implementation of the Vitality idea, Unilever’s operating profit
has increased at an average rate of more than 15% per year. Every
Unilever business, from China to Argentina, has embraced the Vitality
idea. Unilever is using the idea to determine which businesses to
invest in, which to exit from, and where to innovate, and now spends
almost €1 billion a year on vitality-driven innovation. Results are
coming through: the new vitality-inspired Knorr Vie drink, for example,
has sold 60 million bottles since launch, driving Unilever’s profits to
new heights.




© Wolff Olins
GE:
MOST ADMIRED
TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY POWERHOUSE
With 300,000 people in 174 countries, and 3,500 businesses, all
number one or two in their markets, GE defined the 20th century
corporation. With the transfer of leadership from Jack Welch to
Jeff Immelt, GE was poised for transformation. From manufacturing
to technology and service. From US-centric to an emphasis on Asia
and Europe. From a business driven by organizational silos to greater
focus on the customer. From an under-leveraged atomized old-world
brand to a 21st century powerhouse of innovation and impact.

MARKET-FACING BRAND
Wolff Olins worked with GE to create a market-facing brand
architecture that hugely simplified its portfolio of businesses into
solution platforms for customers. This allowed GE to enhance
existing relationships with businesses and develop new relationships
with consumers. We created a modern identity that liberates and
celebrates the GE monogram, and that’s flexible enough to work with
everything from jet engines to light bulbs. We traveled the world to
excite GE leaders about the brand idea ‘Imagination at work’, and
defined with them how the brand should be made real throughout
the business.

$25 BILLION NEW REVENUES
GE was named “most admired company” for two years running
by Fortune magazine. It’s now pitching to countries and governments,
using its new ability to bring unified solutions to its customers. $25
billion in additional revenues have been added by 85 “Imagination
breakthroughs,” inspired by the brand idea. GE is now the fourth
biggest brand in the world, valued in 2008 at $53 billion.




© Wolff Olins
NEW MUSEUM:
NEW ART ENERGY
NEW FOR A NEW MUSEUM
The New Museum of Contemporary Art is New York City’s only
museum dedicated exclusively to showcasing contemporary art.
It’s an adventurous, progressive institution with an internationally
renowned program.

In a city over-saturated with cultural institutions, we faced an exciting
challenge: to create a brand that would drive the museum’s vision
and ambition to become a world player in contemporary art and a
first-choice 21st century cultural destination.

NEW ART AND NEW IDEAS
Based on the idea of “New Art and New Ideas,” our first step was to
simplify the name to loosen up the museum’s institutional feel. More
importantly, this broadened their scope from the narrow definitions
of an art museum to becoming recognized as a cultural hub.

In an exciting collaboration with the museum, we created a visual
expression that features a spectrum of color and language, and a logo
that literally moves and flexes to welcome new artists and audiences,
and announce new art and the new museum. The mantra “open,
fearless and alive” quickly became an invaluable tool for internal
decision-making.

OPEN, FEARLESS AND ALIVE
The award-winning identity system captured the immediate
attention, hearts and minds of onlookers and museum lovers. In the
first four months after the launch, the museum attracted a 600%
surge in visitors and 400% boom in new members. The New Museum
– the place and the brand – continues to self-renew, opening the
doors to future creative collaborations and inviting in new art and
new ideas.




© Wolff Olins                                                               Page 21
Page 22
TATE:
DEMOCRATIZING ART
AMBITION
In the 1990s, the Tate Gallery at Millbank had opened new sites
in Liverpool and St. Ives and formed a breathtaking new ambition:
to create a huge new modern art gallery at Bankside power station
in London. Tate wanted to make all four sites into something new:
not traditional institutions, but exciting destinations.

ACTION
With help from Wolff Olins, Tate reinvented the idea of a gallery
from a single, institutional museum, with a single, institutional view,
to a branded collection of experiences, sharing an attitude but
offering many different ways of seeing. The new Tate would become
a part of everyday national life, democratizing without dumbing
down. Wolff Olins created the Tate brand under the idea “look again,
think again”: both an invitation and a challenge to visitors. Instead of
the confusing “Millbank” and “Bankside,” we named the London sites
Tate Britain and Tate Modern to signal what kind of art people would
find inside. We designed a range of logos that move in and out of
focus, suggesting the dynamic nature of Tate –always changing but
always recognizable. And we shaped Tate’s visual style, influencing
its posters, website, publications and shops. Seven years after the
initial launch, we helped Tate refresh its vision for the decade ahead.

IMPACT
From the day it opened, Tate Modern was a huge success, attracting
double its target visitor numbers, and becoming the most popular
modern art gallery in the world. After a year, Tate’s overall annual
visitor numbers had risen 87% to 7.5 million. As the wrote in May
2005, Tate “has changed the way that Britain sees art, and the way
the world sees Britain.”




© Wolff Olins
Page 24
ALLIANZ: DELIVERING WHAT’S
VALUED
OVERARCHING PROPOSITION
Allianz Global Investors (AGI) is one of the world’s leading asset
managers, with over a trillion euros under management. Its
parent, Allianz, targeted asset management as a core activity in
1998 and grew its presence by acquisition. AGI therefore
consists of a number of independent asset managers, many of
them, such as PIMCO and RCM, extremely well known in their
markets. Having completed cost and performance restructuring
programs, the company recognized that good returns (top
quartile) were not driving the growth they wanted. What they
needed was a value proposition across the group to drive
preference and sales behavior and to improve consistency
across the group.

MEETING REAL NEEDS
We began by understanding the needs of AGI’s clients –
institutions like pension funds, the consultants who advise
them, and the intermediaries who advise individual investors
and pension holders. These needs turned out to be different in
important ways from what AGI had thought mattered most. Out
of all this, we built a new value proposition, and shared it with
AGI’s top management. We developed a sales academy and
training programs to retrain AGI’s salesforce to deliver these
needs. We built the value proposition into appraisal
mechanisms and recruiting profiles. We developed
communications strategies that drove preference, and we
developed criteria for new services that AGI would offer to
financial intermediaries. And we set up a system to track the
delivery of the value proposition across the firm.

RESILIENT BUSINESS
AGI started to implement its new value proposition internally,
with all these strategies and tools, in 2008. The mindset
internally has changed from a singular focus on financial
performance to one where the client’s performance is central.
The business was inevitably hit hard by the 2008 financial
crisis, but its new approach has given it resilience, new
distribution channels and a new confidence in its future.
© Wolff Olins                                                        Page 25
LIVING PROOF:
PUTTING THE BRAINS
BACK INTO
THE BEAUTY INDUSTRY
AMBITION
Living Proof started with a molecule, and some chemistry between
like-minded individuals in Cambridge, MA. They came together,
under the name Andora, as outsiders with absolutely no
preconceived notions about what could and couldn’t be done in the
beauty industry. They shared one, clear ambition to cure the most
common hair and skin ills of the beauty frustrated, one product at
a time, once and for all, and to become the next big beauty company
as a result.

ACTION
Armed with a lab full of radical, never before seen technologies,
access to some of the best life scientists in the world and an initial
product line nearly ready for consumers, Wolff Olins helped to build
and guide the entire brand, from top to bottom. We started by doing
a lot of homework. We took a deep dive into the world of beauty, ran
diagnostics on the competition and went well beneath the skin of
consumer needs to find real insights. We observed that the beauty
industry largely ignored or committed to the basic needs of
consistency, simplicity, confidence, truth and responsibility. We
developed the brand idea – solving problems – and the brand name
“Living Proof” based on the idea that the products produced results
you can see from across a room.

IMPACT
Living Proof has achieved unparalleled success. It is the first brand to
ever receive Allure’s Beauty Breakthrough Award before the first
product (No Frizz) even hit the shelves. With each appearance on
QVC, product has completely sold out. In February 2009, Living Proof
was the first brand to ever launch nationwide in Sephora, and is
credited with increasing traffic during a retail slump and driving
incremental sales. Initial selling led Sephora to triple its 2009 sales
forecast, give the brand a secondary location in all stores and feature
Living Proof in their windows. It has also received huge notoriety in
the design world and been awarded a prestigious Art Directors Club
Silver Cube, a One Show Bronze Pencil, a coveted D&AD Award, and
the prestigious platinum Pentaward all for its packaging, created and
designed by Wolff Olins.

© Wolff Olins                                                              Page 26
TARGET:
UP&UP
AMBITION
In 2006, Target came to Wolff Olins with the challenge of creating an
architecture for their own brand portfolio that would enable them to
achieve a new level of growth.

Our work led to a range of recommendations to simplify and upgrade
Target’s own brands. One of the central insights was that Target
had the opportunity to re-energize their presence in everyday items
by creating a new, vibrant brand that would directly appeal to their
female guests’ needs. The ambition was to create a new brand
spanning all Target products in cleaning, beauty, personal care and
pharmacy, that would drive growth by creating new levels of guest
loyalty and purchase frequency.

ACTION
We worked with Target senior management to define how the
essence of the Target brand should be applied to its own brands. We
conducted both quantitative and qualitative analysis to understand
the competitive landscape, consumer needs and Target’s unique
advantages.

The key insight uncovered that no retailer was providing consumables
that deliver on the three core customer needs of value, ease and
connection, a position that Target was able to own. These learnings
led to the strategy of bringing a helpful, positive attitude to daily
purchases, and the brand name of Up&Up, brought to life through
new packaging design, messaging strategies and online strategies.

IMPACT
Up&Up launched in April 2009 with suncare products and is now
launched in diapers, baby formula, shampoo, cleaning products and
other household goods. “We believe that it will stand out on the shelf,
and is so distinctive that we’ll get new guests that will want to try it
that maybe didn’t even notice the Target brand before,” said Kathee
Tesija, executive vice president of merchandising for Target. Initial
sales results have exceeded expectations and garnered considerable
media and consumer interest. We look forward to tracking its
continued success as it expands into new categories.


© Wolff Olins
HEATHROW EXPRESS:
A BETTER WAY
SWITCH TO THE TRAIN
Heathrow is one of the world’s busiest airports, used by over 50
million people a year. In the early 1990s, BAA, its operator, set up a
joint venture with British Rail to build a fast rail link to central London.
But how would it tempt passengers away from the cheaper Tube or
from the privacy of cars?

AIRLINE SERVICE
To bring travelers on board, Wolff Olins defined a service offer that,
in effect, reinvented the rail link. The model would be airline service
standards, with high speed, high capacity, high levels of information
and special ticketing. Rather than just a piece of infrastructure, this
would be a seamless part of the customer’s whole journey. Wolff Olins
designed almost every aspect of this customer experience, from the
station architecture at Heathrow, through train interiors, to details
like tickets and uniforms. We advised on pricing and ticketing, helped
create the on-board television service, and inspired a highly
professional service culture. And to signal this dramatically new way
to travel, we created the Heathrow Express brand.

A THIRD OF ALL TRAFFIC
The impact was immediate. The service launched in June 1998,
and has grown from zero take 34% of all airport traffic.




© Wolff Olins                                                                  Page 28
BEELINE:
RUSSIA’S TOP BRAND
COMPETE FOR LOYALTY
In 2005, the Russian mobile communications market was
approaching saturation, especially in Moscow. The challenge
was to turn Beeline into a brand that could stand apart and compete
effectively in this context. A more clearly differentiated position
was required, one that focused on creating long-term customer
relationships and deeper emotional bonds to drive real loyalty.
This, combined with a strong identity, has been key to setting a new
standard in the Russian market.

BRIGHT SIDE
With Beeline and BBDO, Wolff Olins developed a new positioning,
identity, communications style, image libraries and campaign for
launch. We then rolled out the brand across all communications,
packaging, retail, web and HQ interiors, alongside a number of
internal brand-building initiatives. The rebrand was a huge success
and at the end of 2005 revenue was up by 40%, market capitalization
by 28% and ARPU by 7%. We continue to work with Beeline as it grows
into new regions and product areas.

MOST VALUABLE
Since relaunching the brand, Beeline has been independently ranked
the most valuable brand in Russia for three consecutive years,
according to Interbrand Zintzmeyer & Lux in Business Week. It has
become the benchmark for all recent brand launches and the one to
beat in mobile telephony.




© Wolff Olins
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL:
GLOBAL IMPACT
HUMAN RIGHTS GOES GLOBAL
Founded in 1961, Amnesty International played for 40 years a unique
role in championing human rights. Focusing on political rights, it
found most of its support in the west, and operated in separate
country units. From 2000 onwards, Amnesty started to adapt to a
globalised world. It broadened its agenda to include economic, social
and cultural rights. It sought more supporters in the developing
world. And in a world where human rights abuses cross borders,
and where the media is international, it knew it needed a single
global voice. To help achieve all this, Amnesty asked Wolff Olins to
create a global identity.

OUTRAGE AND HOPE
We worked in a highly collaborative style, involving Amnesty people
from around the world, bringing many of them together at a
week-long creative conference in London. Everyone agreed that
Amnesty needed to be less legalistic and more activist. Alongside
its rigorous research work, it would increasingly intervene in the
world: a combination of fact and act. We identified its character as
a mix of outrage (about human rights abuses) and hope (for a better
world). We kept Amnesty’s famous candle symbol, building it into a
visual style that dramatizes the idea of intervention, and uses
yellow as the color of hope.

IN THE WORLD
Since its launch in 2008, almost all of Amnesty’s country units have
adopted the global identity. One country, Germany, has been
particularly successful, winning a D&AD award in 2009 for its work.
The next step is for Amnesty in the US, the UK and the Netherlands
to switch to the new brand. Meanwhile, Amnesty has successfully
broadened its scope, mounting a huge global campaign to stop
violence against women, and has attracted 2.2 million supporters in
150 countries. The global brand is already helping Amnesty achieve
a global impact.




© Wolff Olins                                                           Page 30
OI:
PHENOMENON
NEW NETWORK
In 2001, Telemar, the Brazilian telecoms giant, decided to launch
a new mobile phone service. In a market dominated by formal
 and formulaic brands, Telemar wanted to be very different.

CUT THE CRAP
Wolff Olins started by defining a brand idea that captured this
ambition: cut the crap. We created a name for the new brand (Oi
means “hi”), and its visual identity, brand language, communication
style, packaging and many other brand applications. More than 2.2m
people signed up in the first year – almost 20% of the Brazilian
market and four times more than the target. Oi successfully took
customers away from other networks: 75% of Oi’s customers left
other providers to join Oi. The launch was so successful that in 2007
Oi become the brand for all of Telemar’s fixed line, broadband and
mobile services. Wolff Olins developed the brand strategy, brand
architecture and visual expressions for this new, bigger Oi, which is
currently being rolled out across Brazil.

LARGEST NETWORK
In December 2002, the Brazilian business newspaper Istoé Dinheiro
called the new brand a “phenomenon” – and it has continued to
perform phenomenally since. Oi is now the largest telecoms provider
in South America, with 14 million fixed-line and 17 million mobile
customers.




© Wolff Olins                                                           Page 32
150 PEOPLE
21 LANGUAGES
3 OFFICES
1 BUSINESS
PART OF OMNICOM




© Wolff Olins
Michael Wolff and Wally Olins set up Wolff Olins in 1965.   The 80s was the great age of corporate identity.
                                                            Wally wrote the book. We worked For 3i, Q8 and
In the 60s, we did convention-breaking design work for      Prudential. Repsol took us into Spain. And we created
big companies like boc, for government bodies like          a little banking brand in Britain called First Direct.
Camden and for the Beatles.
                                                            We started the 90s with Europe’s biggest corporate
In the 70s, we pioneered corporate identity for P&O.        identity project, BT, and then morphed into branding with
And with tough economic times in Britain, we moved into     Orange, then Heathrow Express. And we closed
France with Colr and Germany with Aral.                     the decade by opening in New York.

                                                            In the 00s, we’ve become a world business with GE, Oi,
                                                            PwC and (RED) in the Americas. Beeline, London 2012,
                                                            Macmillan, Sony Ericsson, Tate and Unilever in Europe.
                                                            And Airtel, Sony, Tokyo Metro and Wacom in Asia.




© Wolff Olins                                                                                                   Page 34
WE’D LOVE TO TALK:
Matthew Adams
Main: +1 212 471 1504
Direct: +1 646 298 7916
matthew.adams@wolffolins.com
Wolff Olins
200 Varick Street
10th Floor
New York, NY 10014
www.wolffolins.com




                Page 35
© Wolff Olins                  Page 35

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WOLFF OLINS 2010

  • 1. © Wolff Olins Page 1
  • 2. OUR PROPOSITION IS ARTICULATED AROUND ONE PRINCIPLE: IN A WORLD WHERE WHAT YOU DO IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN WHAT YOU SAY, WE AIM TO CREATE BETTER REALITIES, NOT JUST A NICER IMAGE. © Wolff Olins Page 2
  • 4. We help companies invent, not predict, the future. In this world, we’re ambitious for clients. We think the future will be better than the past. We believe in progress. We’re optimistic for the world. What we do is create brands, redefine and reinvent existing brands, and increasingly create brand-led product, service and experience innovation. This helps our clients become something unique. Not one of many, but one of one. © Wolff Olins
  • 5. WE HELP YOU EXPAND YOUR AMBITION THROUGH A BOLDER BRAND-LED STRATEGY. WE HELP YOU CREATE BETTER PRODUCTS AND SERVICES THROUGH BRAND-LED INNOVATION. WE USE THE POWER OF BRAND TO DELIVER TRANSFORMATION INSIDE YOUR ORGANIZATION. AND WE HELP YOU TAKE YOUR PLACE IN THE WORLD THROUGH A STRONGER BRAND EXPRESSION. © Wolff Olins
  • 6. SOME OF THE WAYS IN WHICH WE’VE HELPED OUR CLIENTS Brand idea-inspired Since launching the new 85 new “Imagination brand in 2007, NYC tourism Breakthroughs,” creating In the first four months after the launch, the museum has increased by 5% and $25 billion in additional attracted a 600% surge in visitors and 400% boom in tourism spending by revenues. new members. 13.31%. Every Unilever business, from China to Argentina, embraced the brand idea of adding vitality to life. The idea continues to be used to determine which businesses to invest in, Helping Target deliver more which to exit from, and Targetness through where to innovate (almost a simpler architecture €1 billion a year is spent on and new product brands. vitality-driven innovation). The new vitality-inspired Created new business offer Knorr Vie drink has sold that helped Mercedes over 60 million bottles. extend its brand beyond By June 2008 Unilever was automotive and into achieving an underlying services. sales growth close to 8%. From the day it opened, London’s Tate Modern was In its first five years, Orange a huge success, attracting attracted a huge and Within the UK, brand double its target visitor unusually loyal customer recognition has already numbers and becoming the base of 7 million people. reached 85% and globally, most popular art gallery in Year after year, Orange recognition is over 50%. the world. After a year, scored highest of the Sponsorship exceeded Tate’s overall annual visitor mobile networks on expectations with partners numbers had risen 87% to customer satisfaction, and Created a new business spending more than €400 7.5 million. As the wrote in lowest (less than 15%) on model and raised $100 million in the first year and May 2005, Tate “has churn. By the time France million to combat AIDS in the 2012 Olympic games Created a new online social changed the way that Sony Ericsson increased its Telecom bought the Africa, Inspi(RED) is the are setting records for commerce experience to Britain sees art, and the income by 139% to €362 business, it was worth an biggest-selling t-shirt in generating more money transform the UK’s largest way the world sees Britain.” million. astonishing €25 billion Gap history. than any previous games. home shopping retailer.
  • 7. AOL: RENEWED NOT MORE OF THE SAME Wolff Olins have been working with AOL in translating this vision into an innovative new brand platform for their business. Deliberately disruptive, deliberately unlike what is being done by other media businesses. because the media world of today is entirely unlike the media world of yesterday. Today’s media world is not broadcast, it is discovered in fragmented, messy, non-linear, niche conversations. It is a world where AOL already has over 80m unique users engaging with every possible flavor of content from Gothic nightclubs to Tiger Woods’ driving skills. Under these circumstances, how a brand behaves matters much more than old-fashioned pre-conceptions of identity. READY TO DISRUPT Our job was not to make things more consistent, but instead to disrupt accepted web 2.0 conventions by creating a platform that embraces fragmentation, sharing and non- linear pathways into content. Because AOL is content, the brand has to be like content: fluid, flexible, and changeable. It exists as a host for new innovations and new content experiences. © Wolff Olins
  • 9.
  • 10. MERCEDES-BENZ: 10 MONTHS, 3 NEW BUSINESSES GROWING A GLOBAL ICON In 2007, Daimler set up a team of senior executives to develop new growth initiatives beyond the world of cars. Having identified the brand as one of the most important assets to leverage, the Business Innovation team approached Wolff Olins to help develop appropriate businesses to generated new and profitable growth without putting one of the world’s most iconic brands at risk. FROM IDEAS TO REALITY Wolff Olins developed a brand-led innovation framework that ensures that each venture protects the Mercedes-Benz brand, leverages what is tangibly special about it (e.g., German engineering), gives the brand new relevance in the world (attracting younger customers and building new sustainability credentials) and makes money (with a return on sales of 20% or more). Working with Daimler’s Business Innovation team and the leaders of the business in UK, US, China and Japan, we developed ten new businesses to pilot. In January 2009 (ten months after the commencement of the project), Daimler launched solutions for family mobility at the Mercedes-Benz brand centre in Surrey UK. A PLATFORM FOR GROWTH Kinderclass has already led to a significant increase in the sale of child safety accessories and continues to attract younger families to the Mercedes-Benz brand. Later in 2009, a new high profile venture and an exclusive travel service will be launched in the UK and China, respectively. Wolff Olins continues to provide advice and creative assistance as other products and services are being developed and launched around the world. © Wolff Olins Page 10
  • 11. (RED) EMBRACING CONSCIOUS COMMERCE AMBITION (RED)’s ambition was to harness the power of the world’s greatest companies to help eliminate AIDS in Africa. To do this, it created both a new business model and a new brand model to achieve three goals: deliver a source of sustainable income for the Global Fund, provide consumers with a choice that makes giving effortless and last but not least, generate profits and a sense of purpose for partner companies. ACTION The first challenge was to get the all-important founding partners on board. So we helped Bobby Shriver and Bono paint a vision of what (RED) could be. This vision of the future provoked Amex, Converse, Emporio Armani and Gap to take the plunge. We built the brand around the idea that (RED) inspires, connects and gives consumers power, with a unique brand architecture that unites participating businesses by literally embracing their logos to the power (RED). Many partners have gone the extra mile and manufactured products or packaging in African countries, generating jobs and opportunities for local people. IMPACT Within the first five weeks of the US launch, the (RED) brand registered 30% unaided awareness. Over 1.35 million people watched a YouTube video showing the impact and there are over 850,000 (RED) friends on MySpace. In its first two years, (RED) partners delivered $108 million to the Global Fund, more than most countries donated in the same period. This is enough money to give 650,000 people life- saving drugs for a year. © Wolff Olins
  • 12.
  • 13.
  • 14. 2012 OLYMPIC GAMES AMBITION London’s bid for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games was like no other. It promised to inspire the youth of the world. To engage, involve and enthuse – to change lives. It promised to put the Olympic and Paralympic Games at the heart of contemporary life. To achieve this, London’s Organizing Committee needed a powerful brand, one that could inspire and engage with a global audience of four billion people. A brand that could make the Olympic and Paralympic Games more relevant, accessible and inspiring than ever. ACTION We worked with London’s Organizing Committee to define a clear ambition for London 2012. These Games were to be everyone’s. They would call on people to challenge themselves – to try new things, to go further, to discover new abilities. The brand we created supports this ambition. The emblem is 2012, an instantly recognizable symbol and a universal form – one already closely associated with the Games in London. It is unconventionally bold, deliberately spirited and unexpectedly dissonant, echoing London’s qualities of a modern, edgy city. Containing neither sporting images nor pictures of London landmarks, the emblem shows that the Games is more than London, more than sport. It is for everyone, regardless of age, culture and language. It is designed to be populated, to contain infills and images, so it is recognizable enough for everyone to feel and be part of London 2012. IMPACT The ambition – everyone’s – is already shaping London 2012. For the first time the Olympic and Paralympic Games will share the same brand, using their own variant of the emblem. And in another first, the Cultural Olympiad will be able to share the brand. New technology is being put in place to get everyone closer to the action and more deeply involved. Digital media will be used to create a Games in which everyone can play a part wherever they are. The brand we created will shape the experience of 2012. It will take the Games beyond sport, creating wider interest and even greater inspiration. It will create a Games for everyone. © Wolff Olins Page 14
  • 15. NYC: THE UNBRANDABLE CITY UNIFIED,NOT UNIFORM There’s only one New York City. But within that one city are five boroughs, approximately 191 neighborhoods, nearly a million buildings and over 8.2 million people. Each individual has their own New York. Within the mind of every single New Yorker resides a different version of New York City. It’s a city loved in 138 different languages and viewed through an almost infinite mix of cultures, ideologies and ways of life. Everyone living side-by-side. This kaleidoscopic quality is one of the greatest things about this city. It’s the very thing we love. But it also makes it difficult to represent. There is no one symbol, no one logo or brand that means New York City to everyone. CAPTURE THE ESSENCE To create a brand for New York City, the challenge was not to define a purpose, but to capture an essence. This was articulated by the idea: “only one, but no one NYC.” The resulting brand identity has now been embraced not just by New York City’s official marketing, tourism and partnership organization, NYC & Company, but across many City departments. ONE CITY, ONE BRAND From what was once many disparate and confusing identities, the NYC brand has become the singular strong voice for the City, clearly articulated. Tourism revenues rose and the first international advertising campaign has launched, bringing this rigorous brand to a global audience. © Wolff Olins Page 15
  • 16.
  • 17.
  • 18. TARGET: UP&UP AMBITION In 2006, Target came to Wolff Olins with the challenge of creating an architecture for their own brand portfolio that would enable them to achieve a new level of growth. Our work led to a range of recommendations to simplify and upgrade Target’s own brands. One of the central insights was that Target had the opportunity to re-energize their presence in everyday items by creating a new, vibrant brand that would directly appeal to their female guests’ needs. The ambition was to create a new brand spanning all Target products in cleaning, beauty, personal care and pharmacy, that would drive growth by creating new levels of guest loyalty and purchase frequency. ACTION We worked with Target senior management to define how the essence of the Target brand should be applied to its own brands. We conducted both quantitative and qualitative analysis to understand the competitive landscape, consumer needs and Target’s unique advantages. The key insight uncovered that no retailer was providing consumables that deliver on the three core customer needs of value, ease and connection, a position that Target was able to own. These learnings led to the strategy of bringing a helpful, positive attitude to daily purchases, and the brand name of Up&Up, brought to life through new packaging design, messaging strategies and online strategies. IMPACT Up&Up launched in April 2009 with suncare products and is now launched in diapers, baby formula, shampoo, cleaning products and other household goods. “We believe that it will stand out on the shelf, and is so distinctive that we’ll get new guests that will want to try it that maybe didn’t even notice the Target brand before,” said Kathee Tesija, executive vice president of merchandising for Target. Initial sales results have exceeded expectations and garnered considerable media and consumer interest. We look forward to tracking its continued success as it expands into new categories. © Wolff Olins
  • 19. UNILEVER: ADDING VITALITY TO BUSINESS AMBITION Unilever is big. 150 million times a day, in 150 countries, people choose to make Unilever brands part of their lives. But in the consumer goods industry, growth is hard. Unilever decided that it was too diffuse, with too many brands and with no unifying driver of growth. Unilever wanted to become a single-minded, idea-led growth business. ACTION Wolff Olins helped Unilever change, from an invisible owner of brands to a much more visible business, leading its brands through a single idea: “adding vitality to life.” We created a visual identity that expresses “Vitality” and that is starting to appear on every Unilever product. Under this banner, we also worked on dozens of projects to put vitality at the heart of the organization – from designing workplaces to transforming the recruitment process t o training employees how to pass on the stories that underlie the idea. And we’ve helped Unilever invent new products and projects that deliver vitality. IMPACT Since implementation of the Vitality idea, Unilever’s operating profit has increased at an average rate of more than 15% per year. Every Unilever business, from China to Argentina, has embraced the Vitality idea. Unilever is using the idea to determine which businesses to invest in, which to exit from, and where to innovate, and now spends almost €1 billion a year on vitality-driven innovation. Results are coming through: the new vitality-inspired Knorr Vie drink, for example, has sold 60 million bottles since launch, driving Unilever’s profits to new heights. © Wolff Olins
  • 20. GE: MOST ADMIRED TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY POWERHOUSE With 300,000 people in 174 countries, and 3,500 businesses, all number one or two in their markets, GE defined the 20th century corporation. With the transfer of leadership from Jack Welch to Jeff Immelt, GE was poised for transformation. From manufacturing to technology and service. From US-centric to an emphasis on Asia and Europe. From a business driven by organizational silos to greater focus on the customer. From an under-leveraged atomized old-world brand to a 21st century powerhouse of innovation and impact. MARKET-FACING BRAND Wolff Olins worked with GE to create a market-facing brand architecture that hugely simplified its portfolio of businesses into solution platforms for customers. This allowed GE to enhance existing relationships with businesses and develop new relationships with consumers. We created a modern identity that liberates and celebrates the GE monogram, and that’s flexible enough to work with everything from jet engines to light bulbs. We traveled the world to excite GE leaders about the brand idea ‘Imagination at work’, and defined with them how the brand should be made real throughout the business. $25 BILLION NEW REVENUES GE was named “most admired company” for two years running by Fortune magazine. It’s now pitching to countries and governments, using its new ability to bring unified solutions to its customers. $25 billion in additional revenues have been added by 85 “Imagination breakthroughs,” inspired by the brand idea. GE is now the fourth biggest brand in the world, valued in 2008 at $53 billion. © Wolff Olins
  • 21. NEW MUSEUM: NEW ART ENERGY NEW FOR A NEW MUSEUM The New Museum of Contemporary Art is New York City’s only museum dedicated exclusively to showcasing contemporary art. It’s an adventurous, progressive institution with an internationally renowned program. In a city over-saturated with cultural institutions, we faced an exciting challenge: to create a brand that would drive the museum’s vision and ambition to become a world player in contemporary art and a first-choice 21st century cultural destination. NEW ART AND NEW IDEAS Based on the idea of “New Art and New Ideas,” our first step was to simplify the name to loosen up the museum’s institutional feel. More importantly, this broadened their scope from the narrow definitions of an art museum to becoming recognized as a cultural hub. In an exciting collaboration with the museum, we created a visual expression that features a spectrum of color and language, and a logo that literally moves and flexes to welcome new artists and audiences, and announce new art and the new museum. The mantra “open, fearless and alive” quickly became an invaluable tool for internal decision-making. OPEN, FEARLESS AND ALIVE The award-winning identity system captured the immediate attention, hearts and minds of onlookers and museum lovers. In the first four months after the launch, the museum attracted a 600% surge in visitors and 400% boom in new members. The New Museum – the place and the brand – continues to self-renew, opening the doors to future creative collaborations and inviting in new art and new ideas. © Wolff Olins Page 21
  • 23. TATE: DEMOCRATIZING ART AMBITION In the 1990s, the Tate Gallery at Millbank had opened new sites in Liverpool and St. Ives and formed a breathtaking new ambition: to create a huge new modern art gallery at Bankside power station in London. Tate wanted to make all four sites into something new: not traditional institutions, but exciting destinations. ACTION With help from Wolff Olins, Tate reinvented the idea of a gallery from a single, institutional museum, with a single, institutional view, to a branded collection of experiences, sharing an attitude but offering many different ways of seeing. The new Tate would become a part of everyday national life, democratizing without dumbing down. Wolff Olins created the Tate brand under the idea “look again, think again”: both an invitation and a challenge to visitors. Instead of the confusing “Millbank” and “Bankside,” we named the London sites Tate Britain and Tate Modern to signal what kind of art people would find inside. We designed a range of logos that move in and out of focus, suggesting the dynamic nature of Tate –always changing but always recognizable. And we shaped Tate’s visual style, influencing its posters, website, publications and shops. Seven years after the initial launch, we helped Tate refresh its vision for the decade ahead. IMPACT From the day it opened, Tate Modern was a huge success, attracting double its target visitor numbers, and becoming the most popular modern art gallery in the world. After a year, Tate’s overall annual visitor numbers had risen 87% to 7.5 million. As the wrote in May 2005, Tate “has changed the way that Britain sees art, and the way the world sees Britain.” © Wolff Olins
  • 25. ALLIANZ: DELIVERING WHAT’S VALUED OVERARCHING PROPOSITION Allianz Global Investors (AGI) is one of the world’s leading asset managers, with over a trillion euros under management. Its parent, Allianz, targeted asset management as a core activity in 1998 and grew its presence by acquisition. AGI therefore consists of a number of independent asset managers, many of them, such as PIMCO and RCM, extremely well known in their markets. Having completed cost and performance restructuring programs, the company recognized that good returns (top quartile) were not driving the growth they wanted. What they needed was a value proposition across the group to drive preference and sales behavior and to improve consistency across the group. MEETING REAL NEEDS We began by understanding the needs of AGI’s clients – institutions like pension funds, the consultants who advise them, and the intermediaries who advise individual investors and pension holders. These needs turned out to be different in important ways from what AGI had thought mattered most. Out of all this, we built a new value proposition, and shared it with AGI’s top management. We developed a sales academy and training programs to retrain AGI’s salesforce to deliver these needs. We built the value proposition into appraisal mechanisms and recruiting profiles. We developed communications strategies that drove preference, and we developed criteria for new services that AGI would offer to financial intermediaries. And we set up a system to track the delivery of the value proposition across the firm. RESILIENT BUSINESS AGI started to implement its new value proposition internally, with all these strategies and tools, in 2008. The mindset internally has changed from a singular focus on financial performance to one where the client’s performance is central. The business was inevitably hit hard by the 2008 financial crisis, but its new approach has given it resilience, new distribution channels and a new confidence in its future. © Wolff Olins Page 25
  • 26. LIVING PROOF: PUTTING THE BRAINS BACK INTO THE BEAUTY INDUSTRY AMBITION Living Proof started with a molecule, and some chemistry between like-minded individuals in Cambridge, MA. They came together, under the name Andora, as outsiders with absolutely no preconceived notions about what could and couldn’t be done in the beauty industry. They shared one, clear ambition to cure the most common hair and skin ills of the beauty frustrated, one product at a time, once and for all, and to become the next big beauty company as a result. ACTION Armed with a lab full of radical, never before seen technologies, access to some of the best life scientists in the world and an initial product line nearly ready for consumers, Wolff Olins helped to build and guide the entire brand, from top to bottom. We started by doing a lot of homework. We took a deep dive into the world of beauty, ran diagnostics on the competition and went well beneath the skin of consumer needs to find real insights. We observed that the beauty industry largely ignored or committed to the basic needs of consistency, simplicity, confidence, truth and responsibility. We developed the brand idea – solving problems – and the brand name “Living Proof” based on the idea that the products produced results you can see from across a room. IMPACT Living Proof has achieved unparalleled success. It is the first brand to ever receive Allure’s Beauty Breakthrough Award before the first product (No Frizz) even hit the shelves. With each appearance on QVC, product has completely sold out. In February 2009, Living Proof was the first brand to ever launch nationwide in Sephora, and is credited with increasing traffic during a retail slump and driving incremental sales. Initial selling led Sephora to triple its 2009 sales forecast, give the brand a secondary location in all stores and feature Living Proof in their windows. It has also received huge notoriety in the design world and been awarded a prestigious Art Directors Club Silver Cube, a One Show Bronze Pencil, a coveted D&AD Award, and the prestigious platinum Pentaward all for its packaging, created and designed by Wolff Olins. © Wolff Olins Page 26
  • 27. TARGET: UP&UP AMBITION In 2006, Target came to Wolff Olins with the challenge of creating an architecture for their own brand portfolio that would enable them to achieve a new level of growth. Our work led to a range of recommendations to simplify and upgrade Target’s own brands. One of the central insights was that Target had the opportunity to re-energize their presence in everyday items by creating a new, vibrant brand that would directly appeal to their female guests’ needs. The ambition was to create a new brand spanning all Target products in cleaning, beauty, personal care and pharmacy, that would drive growth by creating new levels of guest loyalty and purchase frequency. ACTION We worked with Target senior management to define how the essence of the Target brand should be applied to its own brands. We conducted both quantitative and qualitative analysis to understand the competitive landscape, consumer needs and Target’s unique advantages. The key insight uncovered that no retailer was providing consumables that deliver on the three core customer needs of value, ease and connection, a position that Target was able to own. These learnings led to the strategy of bringing a helpful, positive attitude to daily purchases, and the brand name of Up&Up, brought to life through new packaging design, messaging strategies and online strategies. IMPACT Up&Up launched in April 2009 with suncare products and is now launched in diapers, baby formula, shampoo, cleaning products and other household goods. “We believe that it will stand out on the shelf, and is so distinctive that we’ll get new guests that will want to try it that maybe didn’t even notice the Target brand before,” said Kathee Tesija, executive vice president of merchandising for Target. Initial sales results have exceeded expectations and garnered considerable media and consumer interest. We look forward to tracking its continued success as it expands into new categories. © Wolff Olins
  • 28. HEATHROW EXPRESS: A BETTER WAY SWITCH TO THE TRAIN Heathrow is one of the world’s busiest airports, used by over 50 million people a year. In the early 1990s, BAA, its operator, set up a joint venture with British Rail to build a fast rail link to central London. But how would it tempt passengers away from the cheaper Tube or from the privacy of cars? AIRLINE SERVICE To bring travelers on board, Wolff Olins defined a service offer that, in effect, reinvented the rail link. The model would be airline service standards, with high speed, high capacity, high levels of information and special ticketing. Rather than just a piece of infrastructure, this would be a seamless part of the customer’s whole journey. Wolff Olins designed almost every aspect of this customer experience, from the station architecture at Heathrow, through train interiors, to details like tickets and uniforms. We advised on pricing and ticketing, helped create the on-board television service, and inspired a highly professional service culture. And to signal this dramatically new way to travel, we created the Heathrow Express brand. A THIRD OF ALL TRAFFIC The impact was immediate. The service launched in June 1998, and has grown from zero take 34% of all airport traffic. © Wolff Olins Page 28
  • 29. BEELINE: RUSSIA’S TOP BRAND COMPETE FOR LOYALTY In 2005, the Russian mobile communications market was approaching saturation, especially in Moscow. The challenge was to turn Beeline into a brand that could stand apart and compete effectively in this context. A more clearly differentiated position was required, one that focused on creating long-term customer relationships and deeper emotional bonds to drive real loyalty. This, combined with a strong identity, has been key to setting a new standard in the Russian market. BRIGHT SIDE With Beeline and BBDO, Wolff Olins developed a new positioning, identity, communications style, image libraries and campaign for launch. We then rolled out the brand across all communications, packaging, retail, web and HQ interiors, alongside a number of internal brand-building initiatives. The rebrand was a huge success and at the end of 2005 revenue was up by 40%, market capitalization by 28% and ARPU by 7%. We continue to work with Beeline as it grows into new regions and product areas. MOST VALUABLE Since relaunching the brand, Beeline has been independently ranked the most valuable brand in Russia for three consecutive years, according to Interbrand Zintzmeyer & Lux in Business Week. It has become the benchmark for all recent brand launches and the one to beat in mobile telephony. © Wolff Olins
  • 30. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL: GLOBAL IMPACT HUMAN RIGHTS GOES GLOBAL Founded in 1961, Amnesty International played for 40 years a unique role in championing human rights. Focusing on political rights, it found most of its support in the west, and operated in separate country units. From 2000 onwards, Amnesty started to adapt to a globalised world. It broadened its agenda to include economic, social and cultural rights. It sought more supporters in the developing world. And in a world where human rights abuses cross borders, and where the media is international, it knew it needed a single global voice. To help achieve all this, Amnesty asked Wolff Olins to create a global identity. OUTRAGE AND HOPE We worked in a highly collaborative style, involving Amnesty people from around the world, bringing many of them together at a week-long creative conference in London. Everyone agreed that Amnesty needed to be less legalistic and more activist. Alongside its rigorous research work, it would increasingly intervene in the world: a combination of fact and act. We identified its character as a mix of outrage (about human rights abuses) and hope (for a better world). We kept Amnesty’s famous candle symbol, building it into a visual style that dramatizes the idea of intervention, and uses yellow as the color of hope. IN THE WORLD Since its launch in 2008, almost all of Amnesty’s country units have adopted the global identity. One country, Germany, has been particularly successful, winning a D&AD award in 2009 for its work. The next step is for Amnesty in the US, the UK and the Netherlands to switch to the new brand. Meanwhile, Amnesty has successfully broadened its scope, mounting a huge global campaign to stop violence against women, and has attracted 2.2 million supporters in 150 countries. The global brand is already helping Amnesty achieve a global impact. © Wolff Olins Page 30
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  • 32. OI: PHENOMENON NEW NETWORK In 2001, Telemar, the Brazilian telecoms giant, decided to launch a new mobile phone service. In a market dominated by formal and formulaic brands, Telemar wanted to be very different. CUT THE CRAP Wolff Olins started by defining a brand idea that captured this ambition: cut the crap. We created a name for the new brand (Oi means “hi”), and its visual identity, brand language, communication style, packaging and many other brand applications. More than 2.2m people signed up in the first year – almost 20% of the Brazilian market and four times more than the target. Oi successfully took customers away from other networks: 75% of Oi’s customers left other providers to join Oi. The launch was so successful that in 2007 Oi become the brand for all of Telemar’s fixed line, broadband and mobile services. Wolff Olins developed the brand strategy, brand architecture and visual expressions for this new, bigger Oi, which is currently being rolled out across Brazil. LARGEST NETWORK In December 2002, the Brazilian business newspaper Istoé Dinheiro called the new brand a “phenomenon” – and it has continued to perform phenomenally since. Oi is now the largest telecoms provider in South America, with 14 million fixed-line and 17 million mobile customers. © Wolff Olins Page 32
  • 33. 150 PEOPLE 21 LANGUAGES 3 OFFICES 1 BUSINESS PART OF OMNICOM © Wolff Olins
  • 34. Michael Wolff and Wally Olins set up Wolff Olins in 1965. The 80s was the great age of corporate identity. Wally wrote the book. We worked For 3i, Q8 and In the 60s, we did convention-breaking design work for Prudential. Repsol took us into Spain. And we created big companies like boc, for government bodies like a little banking brand in Britain called First Direct. Camden and for the Beatles. We started the 90s with Europe’s biggest corporate In the 70s, we pioneered corporate identity for P&O. identity project, BT, and then morphed into branding with And with tough economic times in Britain, we moved into Orange, then Heathrow Express. And we closed France with Colr and Germany with Aral. the decade by opening in New York. In the 00s, we’ve become a world business with GE, Oi, PwC and (RED) in the Americas. Beeline, London 2012, Macmillan, Sony Ericsson, Tate and Unilever in Europe. And Airtel, Sony, Tokyo Metro and Wacom in Asia. © Wolff Olins Page 34
  • 35. WE’D LOVE TO TALK: Matthew Adams Main: +1 212 471 1504 Direct: +1 646 298 7916 matthew.adams@wolffolins.com Wolff Olins 200 Varick Street 10th Floor New York, NY 10014 www.wolffolins.com Page 35 © Wolff Olins Page 35