Locative Media And Responsive Environments

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This presentation explores the evolution and trajectory of ubiquitous computing technologies that enable designers to embed media artifacts and computational systems in physical space. By placing custom bar code glyphs, GPS/Google Earth markers, sensor systems or other smart-phone-readable triggers in physical locations, designers can create hyperlinks connecting real-world objects or places with a wide variety of media -- from video, audio and text content to dynamic data feeds and opportunities for interactions with both human and non-human agencies. Crucially, however, this layering practice does not stop at the level of the hyperlink or the traditional notion of Augmented Reality. Rather, designers are beginning to perceive opportunities for embedding responsive computational power in physical space, enabling environments to track, profile and communicate with their inhabitants, providing customized, adaptive and anticipatory user experiences.

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Locative Media And Responsive Environments

  1. 1. Locative Media and Responsive Environments<br />IMD Seminar 22 April 2009<br />LFG/JW<br />
  2. 2. Interface<br />
  3. 3.
  4. 4.
  5. 5.
  6. 6.
  7. 7.
  8. 8.
  9. 9.
  10. 10. Everyware<br />
  11. 11. &quot;...experimental programs seem to indicate that molecular electronics is a possible avenue to overcoming the limits of increasing density in silicon chips, while ushering in an era of computers 100 billion times as fast as a Pentium microprocessor; this would make it possible to pack the computing power of a hundred 1999 computer workstations into a space the size of a grain of salt. Based on these technologies, computer scientists envisage the possibility of computing environments where billions of microscopic information-processing devices will be spread everywhere &apos;like pigment in the wall paint.&apos; If so, then computer networks will be, materially speaking, the fabric of our lives.“<br /> -Manuel Castells, Rise of the Network Society, 53.<br />
  12. 12. &quot;...experimental programs seem to indicate that molecular electronics is a possible avenue to overcoming the limits of increasing density in silicon chips, while ushering in an era of computers 100 billion times as fast as a Pentium microprocessor; this would make it possible to pack the computing power of a hundred 1999 computer workstations into a space the size of a grain of salt. Based on these technologies, computer scientists envisage the possibility of computing environments where billions of microscopic information-processing devices will be spread everywhere &apos;like pigment in the wall paint.&apos; If so, then computer networks will be, materially speaking, the fabric of our lives.“<br /> -Manuel Castells, Rise of the Network Society, 53.<br />
  13. 13. &quot;...experimental programs seem to indicate that molecular electronics is a possible avenue to overcoming the limits of increasing density in silicon chips, while ushering in an era of computers 100 billion times as fast as a Pentium microprocessor; this would make it possible to pack the computing power of a hundred 1999 computer workstations into a space the size of a grain of salt. Based on these technologies, computer scientists envisage the possibility of computing environments where billions of microscopic information-processing devices will be spread everywhere &apos;like pigment in the wall paint.&apos; If so, then computer networks will be, materially speaking, the fabric of our lives.“<br /> -Manuel Castells, Rise of the Network Society, 53.<br />
  14. 14.
  15. 15. Ubiquitous Computing<br />
  16. 16. Pervasive Computing<br />
  17. 17. Pervasive Computing<br /><ul><li>Distributed at all scales
  18. 18. Interoperable
  19. 19. Commonplace</li></li></ul><li>Standards<br />
  20. 20. Emergent<br />
  21. 21.
  22. 22. Christmas<br />
  23. 23.
  24. 24.
  25. 25. December 25th, 1990<br />
  26. 26.
  27. 27. &quot;I have a dream for the Web [in which computers] become capable of analyzing all the data on the Web – the content, links, and transactions between people and computers. A ‘Semantic Web’, which should make this possible, has yet to emerge, but when it does, the day-to-day mechanisms of trade, bureaucracy and our daily lives will be handled by machines talking to machines. The ‘intelligent agents’ people have touted for ages will finally materialize.&quot;<br /> -Tim Berners-Lee<br />
  28. 28. Early Internet<br />Basic Web<br />Web 2.0<br />
  29. 29.
  30. 30. Standards<br />
  31. 31.
  32. 32. Emergent<br />
  33. 33.
  34. 34. Semantic Web + Ubicomp =<br />
  35. 35. Internet of Things<br />
  36. 36.
  37. 37. First Gen<br />
  38. 38. Passive Things<br />
  39. 39.
  40. 40.
  41. 41. AR Toolkit<br />QR Code (Japan, China, UK)<br />Datamatrix<br />(USA DOD, Germany)<br />Visual Codes<br />D-touch<br />Spotcode<br />
  42. 42. QR Codes: Survey of recent projects<br />Add to Friends<br />QR Code Facebookmashup<br />“Add to Friends” is a Facebook application that enables users to add friends by snapping photos of custom QR codes associated with Facebook profiles. <br />Facebook app URL: http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=21352510322<br />More info: http://www.etre.com/blog/2008/02/facebook_add_to_friends_qr_code_t_shirt/<br />
  43. 43. QR Codes: Survey of recent projects<br />P8TCH<br />Velcro-backed QR-code URL patch<br />“Think of it as a TinyURL you can wear. The QR Code on the p8tch is a URL. If you scan the code with your iPhone, Mobile Safari will take you directly to that URL. If it&apos;s a Google Maps link, your iPhone will take you directly to the map. If it&apos;s a YouTube link, you&apos;ll see the movie fullscreen. Cool, right?”<br />More info: <br />http://p8tch.com/<br />
  44. 44. QR Codes: Survey of recent projects<br />Semapedia.org<br />QR Code Wikipedia mashup<br />“Our goal is to connect the virtual and physical world by bringing the right information from the internet to the relevant place in physical space.”<br />More info: <br />http://www.semapedia.org/<br />
  45. 45. QR Codes: Survey of recent projects<br />Pet Shop Boys - Integral<br />QR Code-enriched music video/activism initiative<br />“The QR Code links in the video are a catalogue of online content about issues of civil liberties, as well as links that will give you the opportunity to get involved in campaigning against the erosion of our personal freedom.”<br />More info: <br />http://www.petshopboys.co.uk/browser.aspx?page=petheads.integral<br />
  46. 46. QR Codes: Survey of recent projects<br />Kaywa Pixel Scarf<br />Fashion accessory<br />Wearing a QR code confers the wearer with mystery and geekitude, signaling social niche position on both sides of the scanning-moment.<br />More info: <br />http://lendorff.kaywa.com/<br />
  47. 47. Related tagging/mobile/ubicomp projects<br />Spellbinder<br />Image-recognition tagging/mobile AR “invisible grafitti” <br />“Scottish researchers are turning to camera phones to help bridge the virtual and real worlds.<br />Using image-matching algorithms the researchers have found a way to adorn the real world with digital content.<br />The technology has already been used to create a guide of Edinburgh that allows people to find virtual artworks placed around the city using their mobile.” <br />More info: <br />http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/6938244.stm<br />Project page:<br />http://blue.caad.ed.ac.uk/branded/stageone/<br />
  48. 48. Second Gen<br />
  49. 49. Active Things<br />
  50. 50.
  51. 51.
  52. 52.
  53. 53.
  54. 54. Standards<br />
  55. 55.
  56. 56. Emergent<br />
  57. 57. New Relationships<br />
  58. 58.
  59. 59. Bruce Sterling<br />
  60. 60. Spimes<br />
  61. 61. <ul><li>plannable
  62. 62. trackable
  63. 63. findable
  64. 64. recyclable
  65. 65. uniquely identified
  66. 66. generate digital histories</li></li></ul><li>Environments<br />
  67. 67. Sensing<br />
  68. 68.
  69. 69. Profiling<br />
  70. 70.
  71. 71. Enabling<br />
  72. 72.
  73. 73. Emergent?<br />
  74. 74. “Can an intelligent house fall in love with the house next door,” asks Gold. “Can they have baby houses? Is an architect a trained “womb” for houses, or more crudely, is an architect how a house makes another house? Does an architect feel like she/he is violating fundamental forces of evolution if she/he does not include the latest new technology in the house she/he next gives birth to? Do you believe in progress? Is a suburban house of today better than a terrace house in London in 1850 which was better than a thatched country cottage in 1700 which was better than the tepees and mud huts that Columbus found in the New World? Is the house that Donald Trump lives in better than the house you live in? If you were an architect and you designed an intelligent house, would the house’s own happiness matter to you? If the couple that bought the house you designed got a divorce, do you think you should be libel for damages?”<br /> -Rich Gold<br />
  75. 75. Design Process<br />
  76. 76.
  77. 77.
  78. 78. Brute force<br />
  79. 79.
  80. 80. Modularity<br />
  81. 81.
  82. 82. Too Literal<br />
  83. 83. The New Actual/The New Virtual<br />
  84. 84. Freedom has been obliterated, liquidated by liberation; truth has been supplanted by verification; the community has been liquidated and absorbed by communication … Everywhere we see a paradoxical logic: the idea is destroyed by its own realization, by its own excess. <br /> -Jean Baudrillard<br />

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