Stepping up: Beyond Design Thinking

2,229 views

Published on

Kevin's closing keynote presentation at the Design Management Institute's conference in London in 2010.

The presentation tackled two key questions: Why is design thinking such a hot topic with executives, but leaves so many designers cold? And: Does the demand for design thinking represent more of an opportunity than the thinking itself?

It was based on an article of the same title for the Design Management Review http://www.plan.bz/plan-views/2010/september/steppingup

Published in: Design, Business, Technology

Stepping up: Beyond Design Thinking

  1. 1. DMI Transforming Design Stepping up Kevin McCullagh Founder, Plan 08 September 2010
  2. 2. Design thinking Wicked problems / user-driven / inter-disciplinary iterative / prototyping / failing early
  3. 3. The opportunity
  4. 4. Stepping up Why it leaves so many designers cold
  5. 5. Stepping up Why it leaves so many designers cold Why it’s such a hot topic with business
  6. 6. Stepping up Why it leaves so many designers cold Why it’s such a hot topic with business How designers can step up to seize the opportunity
  7. 7. Stepping up Designers left cold
  8. 8. 2009
  9. 9. Milan 2009
  10. 10. ‘Even turkeys can fly in a tornado’
  11. 11. Designers drinking too much of their own Kool Aid?
  12. 12. Milan 2009
  13. 13. Milan 2009
  14. 14. Fluffy concept
  15. 15. Design thinking An ill-defined notion Roger Martin A way of thinking Tim Brown Designer’s sensibility and methods
  16. 16. Balanced left and right brain thinking Analytical Intuitive
  17. 17. Martina Navratilova
  18. 18. Designers’ brain
  19. 19. Tim Brown A false distinction Design doing Design thinking
  20. 20. Tim Brown 2008 Design doing Design thinking
  21. 21. Tim Brown 2009 Design Doing Design Thinking
  22. 22. Design thinking = Design process tool for managers to tackle a wide range of business problems Source: Tim Brown, ‘Design Thinking’, Harvard Business Review, June 2008
  23. 23. Bill Moggridge New story, old idea ‘ esign thinking is d a new story, not a new process.’ Bill Moggridge, Designerly Thinking: In conversation with Bill Moggridge, NESTA, 12 June 2007
  24. 24. Design thinking An ill-defined notion Roger Martin A way of thinking Tim Brown Designer’s sensibility and methods
  25. 25. Design thinking Title An ill-defined Sub-heading notion Roger Martin A way of thinking Thinking Tim Brown Designer’s sensibility and methods
  26. 26. Design thinking Title An ill-defined Sub-heading notion Roger Martin A way of thinking Tim Brown Designer’s sensibility and methods Thinking Designing
  27. 27. Helen Walters Former editor of Design and Innovation, Bloomberg BusinessWeek ‘ we] need [a] better [ definition of design thinking, more widely understood. [it’s a] Wild west of interpretation right now.’ Helen Walters, Tweet, 9 March 2010
  28. 28. Don Norman ‘ esign thinking D is a nonsensical phrase that deserves to die’ Don Norman, ‘The Research-Practice Gulf’, Design Research Conference, 11 May 2010
  29. 29. Don Norman ‘ esign thinking is D a public relations term for good, oldfashioned creative thinking.’ Don Norman, ‘Design Thinking: A useful myth’, Core77, 25 June 2010
  30. 30. Stepping up Hot topic with business
  31. 31. Redesign Business Summit 11-12 March 2010
  32. 32. The Big Re-Think Redesigning business summit 11-12 March 2010 ‘ Business leaders are casting around for new ideas... ...design thinking is offering itself up as one of the new ideas’ Vijay V Vaitheeswaran, ‘The Big Re-Think: redesigning business summit’, 11-12 March 2010 Vijay V Vaitheeswaran, Global Correspondent, The Economist
  33. 33. Crisis of trust and legitimacy Richard Fuld, Ex-CEO Lehman Bros
  34. 34. Discredited ideas Efficient markets High pay = high talent Shareholder value Light-touch regulation The wisdom of crowds
  35. 35. The rise of design Leaders discredited, designers legitimated Leaders Designers
  36. 36. Section heading 1987 1997 2007
  37. 37. 1987 Margaret Thatcher
  38. 38. 1987 Hair
  39. 39. 1987
  40. 40. 1987 Ford Escort
  41. 41. 1987 Newcastle Polytechnic BA Design for Industry Design craftsman Design thinker
  42. 42. 1987 Design was a cult
  43. 43. Section heading 1987 1997 2007
  44. 44. 1997 The return of Steve Jobs
  45. 45. 1997 New Labour elected
  46. 46. 1997 Creative Britain ‘ e can say with W pride that Britain is the “design workshop of the world” – leading a creative revolution’ Tony Blair, ‘Britain’s design industry, Foreign and commonwealth office, 1998
  47. 47. 1997 The creative sector 40 million Americans ! Fine art auctions Advertising IT services Music industry Design Gallery and museum attendants
  48. 48. 1997 Death of Diana
  49. 49. 1997 Emoting
  50. 50. 1997 Culture of emotions A shift from the head to the heart
  51. 51. Section heading 1987 1997 2007
  52. 52. 2007 Design on TV
  53. 53. 2007 Raised aesthetic expectations ‘ he rise of look and T feel – aesthetics are a universal human desire NOT a luxury’ Virginia Postrel, ‘The Substance of Style’, 2003
  54. 54. 2007 Creativity a mass aspiration
  55. 55. 2007 Tim Brown is a big hit at Davos
  56. 56. Stepping up Stepping up – seizing the opportunity
  57. 57. Cut down on the Kool Aid!
  58. 58. Not a magic process Design Thinking ™ ©®
  59. 59. New capabilities Skills + Knowledge Strategic skills Facilitation / Corporate perspective / Technical Marketing knowledge Craft skills Specification Prototyping CAD/DTP Detailing Sketching Creativity Synthesis Trends analysis User research
  60. 60. New skills Different problems require different specialist knowledge and skills Strategic skills Facilitation / Corporate perspective / Technical Marketing knowledge Craft skills ???? ???? Specification Prototyping CAD/DTP Detailing Sketching Creativity Trends analysis User research
  61. 61. Section heading Foundations Recent steps Next steps
  62. 62. Foundations More than stylists 5 levels of design 5 Problem framing 4 Problem solving 3 Functionality usability 2 Aesthetics 1 Accidental design Source: adapted from www.bplusd.org
  63. 63. Foundations More than stylists 5 Problem framing 4 Problem solving 3 Functionality usability 2 Aesthetics 1 Accidental design Source: adapted from www.bplusd.org Design
  64. 64. Foundations More than stylists 5 Problem framing Design thinking 4 Problem solving 3 Functionality usability 2 Aesthetics 1 Accidental design Source: adapted from www.bplusd.org Design
  65. 65. Foundations Cross-silo facilitators Taking a holistic view as interdisciplinary translators and bridges between silos Customer support Channel Packaging design Finance UX Product design Marketing RD Designers
  66. 66. Foundations Cross-silo facilitators Christopher Lorenz envisaged a bigger role for designers in 1980s ‘ designers good] [ translators, bridges and catalysts [between corporate silos]... [playing the role of] facilitator, coordinator, evaluator and completer.’ Christopher Lorenz, ‘The Design Dimension’, 1986
  67. 67. Foundations Resolving and completing ‘ esign is the best D you can do by next Wednesday!’ Charles Eames
  68. 68. Foundations Basic skills Creativity Visualising Prototyping
  69. 69. Foundations Synthesisers Christopher Lorenz envisaged a bigger role for designers in 1980s ‘t is not the mundane skills of I sketching, shaping and colouring which make the industrial designer such a valuable resource, but the multi-faceted ability to contribute to the work of other disciplines, and to stimulate, interpret and synthesise it.’ Christopher Lorenz, ‘The Design Dimension’, 1986
  70. 70. Foundations Synthesisers ‘ aser intelligence probes L deeply into a topic, but ignores opportunities to cross-pollinate... Searchlight intelligence may not probe as deeply but is always scanning the environment and [spotting] connections across spheres.’ Howard Gardner, ‘Five Minds for the Future’, 2007
  71. 71. Foundations Ambiguity Tackling fuzzy and multi-dimensional ‘wicked problems’
  72. 72. Foundations Scope Title Sub-heading
  73. 73. Foundations Frame Title Sub-heading
  74. 74. Foundations Analyse Title Sub-heading
  75. 75. Foundations Synthesis Title Knitting together disparate information Sub-heading into a new and coherent whole
  76. 76. Foundations Editors Disciplined focus ‘t was about being very focused I and not trying to do too much… the key was getting rid of stuff’ Jonathan Ive quoted in ‘The guts of a new machine’, New York Times, 30 November 2003
  77. 77. Foundations Cultural interpreters No need to be defensive about aesthetics ‘ Design is] ‘problem solving [ in a cultural context’ Ron Arad
  78. 78. Foundations Recent steps Next steps
  79. 79. Recent steps Better at communicating process
  80. 80. Recent steps User research methods have been formalised
  81. 81. Recent steps Experience design A genuinely new and powerful approach
  82. 82. Recent steps Service design A genuinely new and powerful approach Trip planning At airport In aircraft Destination
  83. 83. Social design
  84. 84. Recent steps Engagement facilitators ‘ those looking for a prescribed way to implement design thinking are destined to be disappointed. It’s a messy, opaque process that depends as much on group dynamics as intellect or insight....the process was more important than the product.... the idea is that people need a way to engage in multiple places within their community.’ Helen Walters, ‘Inside the Design Thinking Process’, Businessweek.com,14 December 2009
  85. 85. Foundations Recent steps Next steps
  86. 86. Next steps Design needs to raise its game ‘ reativity is not C in short supply... Design no longer delivers competitive advantage’ Roberto Verganti, Design-Driven Innovation, 2009
  87. 87. Next steps Design needs take more of its own medicine We need to innovate how we innovate There is no one size fits all approach to innovation Roberto Verganti
  88. 88. Next steps High quality design is hard We’re all designers, it’s what separates us from the apes ‘ esign is not D important. Good design is important.’ Jonathan Ive, ‘Lessons from America’, Design Council / HEFCE, September 2006
  89. 89. Next steps More analytical rigour Balanced left and right brain thinking Analytical Intuitive
  90. 90. Next steps More analytical rigour Precision over woolliness
  91. 91. Next steps Too much focus on consumers
  92. 92. Next steps Vision Over insight and empathy ‘ adical innovation R does not come from users... Designers have become less visionary. They have spent the last 10 years getting close to consumers and trying to become businessmen, and have lost their visions.’ Roberto Verganti The Big Re-Think: redesigning business summit 11-12 March 2010
  93. 93. Next steps Consumer needs last ‘ echnology first, T invention second, needs last.’ Don Norman, ‘Technology First, Needs Last’, interactions.acm.org, March/April 2010
  94. 94. Next steps Foresight 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 ‘ Strategy must be created from the future backwards’ Gary Hamel
  95. 95. Next steps Foresight of interpreters Consumers Rear-view mirror outlook Experts Professional interpreters of the future
  96. 96. Next steps Design leadership challenge Balancing Process, Context and Talent Process Context Talent
  97. 97. Design thinking Overly focuses on process Design thinking Process Context Talent
  98. 98. Setting the context is key the design leadership challenge Process Knowledge Analysis Foresight Vision Context Talent
  99. 99. Underplays the importance of finding, nurturing and motivating talent Design thinking Process Context Talent
  100. 100. A new generation of talent Rachel
  101. 101. Thank you We join the dots www.plan.bz

×