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Designing Goal-based Experiences

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When designing for information retrieval experiences, the customer must always be right. This tutorial will give you the tools to uncover user needs and design the context for delivering information, whether that be through search, taxonomies or something entirely different.

What you will learn:

* A broadly applicable method for understanding user needs in diverse information access contexts
* A collection of information retrieval patterns relevant to multiple settings such as enterprise search and information access, service design, and product and platform management

We will also discuss the impact of organizational and cultural factors on design decisions and why it is essential, that you frame business and technology challenges in the right way.

The tutorial builds on lessons learned from a large customer project focusing on transforming user experience. The scope of this program included ~25 separate web-delivered products, a large document repository, integrated customer service and support processes, content management, taxonomy and ontology creation, and search and information retrieval solutions.

Joe will share the innovate methods and surprising insight that emerged in the process.

Published in: Technology, Education

Designing Goal-based Experiences

  1. Design For Goals Tutorial: JBoye 09
  2. Joe Lamantia Independent Consultant 15 years: design, technology, business write & speak: user experience – ubicomp JoeLamantia.com @mojoe joe.lamantia@gmail.com
  3. Goals* Experiences Real*
  4. Todayʼs Menu Introductions & Background - 20 min Understanding Audiences - 40 min Break - 10 min Modes, Scenarios, Patterns & Life-cycles - 60 min Break - 10 min Design - 20 min Lessons - 20 min Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 4
  5. Background Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 5
  6. Partnership with Keane Information Collection and Business Surveyor Project Profile Process Transformation Client: Leading Provider of Credit Ratings, Research and Risk Analysis for Fixed-Income Securities and Other Obligations Business Need: Evolve the website into a more compelling information delivery environment that is superior to competitor sites, promotes the companyʼs overall business objectives, and meets the needs of business users, shareholders, issuers and investors Strategic Goals • Usability: Identify usability issues and recommend areas of improvement to ensure that customers and stakeholders will use it because they want to, not because they have to • Scalability: Define a site architecture that is clearly capable of supporting future increases in user base and functional capability • Flexibility: Define a site structure that allows for functional enhancements to made easily within a reasonable time-to- market • Reliability: Verify that the right architectural components, monitoring tools and operational practices are being used to ensure that the site is stable and continues to run smoothly • Manageability: Develop a build vs. buy strategy that makes the most efficient use of internal resources Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 6
  7. Scope Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 7
  8. Scope Address the full spectrum of global finance • Worldwide and real time • All activities & topics Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 7
  9. Scope Address the full spectrum of global finance • Worldwide and real time • All activities & topics 700,000 documents • Refresh 1000 / day • Diverse formats; pdf, doc, txt Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 7
  10. Scope Address the full spectrum of global finance • Worldwide and real time • All activities & topics 700,000 documents • Refresh 1000 / day • Diverse formats; pdf, doc, txt Millions of data points (ratings) • Qualitative and quantitative Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 7
  11. Scope Address the full spectrum of global finance • Worldwide and real time • All activities & topics 700,000 documents • Refresh 1000 / day • Diverse formats; pdf, doc, txt Millions of data points (ratings) • Qualitative and quantitative 25 Services & products on-line • Combining documents and data • Business intelligence, analysis / synthesis capabilities Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 7
  12. Scope Address the full spectrum of global finance • Worldwide and real time • All activities & topics 700,000 documents • Refresh 1000 / day • Diverse formats; pdf, doc, txt Millions of data points (ratings) • Qualitative and quantitative 25 Services & products on-line • Combining documents and data • Business intelligence, analysis / synthesis capabilities Multiple delivery channels • Web applications, desktop applications, data feeds, document repository, web repository Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 7
  13. Scope Address the full spectrum of global finance • Worldwide and real time • All activities & topics 700,000 documents • Refresh 1000 / day • Diverse formats; pdf, doc, txt Millions of data points (ratings) • Qualitative and quantitative 25 Services & products on-line • Combining documents and data • Business intelligence, analysis / synthesis capabilities Multiple delivery channels • Web applications, desktop applications, data feeds, document repository, web repository Diverse customers • 100,000 users • All perspectives Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 7
  14. Current Limitations Barriers to Ratings and Research Expansion Clients can only realize the value of Client research if they can find it User Issues Business Impacts  Ineffective Basic & Advanced Search  Detracts from the value of Client ratings and research  No document cross-referencing  Limits ability to attract and retain “non-captive”  Ability to browse content tedious at best customers in new markets Example Scenario: Search for Relevant Research Senior Credit Analyst ! ! ! ! Client.com “quick search” for “Quick search” by “Ticker” for Advanced Search; Leaves Client.com and finds “British Air”; no search BAY.L; no search results non-intuitive interface desired content on results found found competitor’s website “You have to know what you’re looking for” — Senior Credit Analyst, AIG Global Investment Group Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 8
  15. Problem Example: Barriers to Value Perception A poor user experience lowered perceptions of Client Example Scenario: View Latest Research Ratings Advisory ! ! ! ! Detail page contains assorted Related Research tab shows a Research is split across a Goes to competitor’s site first, links and tabs; content not seemingly random list of number of ill-defined doc because competitor’s site is on one page assorted documents types, published at easier to use different times Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 9
  16. Problem Example: Barriers to Value Perception A poor user experience lowered perceptions of Client Example Scenario: View Latest Research Ratings Advisory ! ! ! ! Detail page contains assorted Related Research tab shows a Research is split across a Goes to competitor’s site first, links and tabs; content not seemingly random list of number of ill-defined doc because competitor’s site is on one page assorted documents types, published at easier to use different times “I’ll go to (a competitor’s site) first, then I’ll go to (the company’s) if I have the time…” — Director, Global Ratings Advisory Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 9
  17. Problem Example: Barriers to Value Perception A poor user experience lowered perceptions of Client Example Scenario: View Latest Research Ratings Advisory ! ! ! ! Detail page contains assorted Related Research tab shows a Research is split across a Goes to competitor’s site first, links and tabs; content not seemingly random list of number of ill-defined doc because competitor’s site is on one page assorted documents types, published at easier to use different times “I’ll go to (a competitor’s site) first, then I’ll go to (the company’s) if I have the time…” — Director, Global Ratings Advisory User Issues  Research content is inconsistent Business Impacts  Hampers deepening of relationships  Related research functions are ineffective with established clients  Sites are difficult for users to understand  Detracts from the company’s reputation as an and navigate authoritative source of high quality info Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 9
  18. Business Problems Client.com could not effectively support growth because it failed to meet users’ needs Barriers to Product Adoption Data & Employees  Limited integration of data and features Analytics  Lack of common user experience Data & Analytics Markets Quantitative Users Barriers to Ratings and Research Xyz Ratings & Expansion Adjacent Markets Research  Ineffective Basic & Advanced Search Equity Investors, Hedge Fund Managers  Limited related research navigation Traditional Markets Issuers, Intermediaries & Fixed Barriers to Emerging Market Income Investors Global Development  Numerous barriers to getting basic information Expansion  Lack of integration between the main website and local Emerging Markets New Issuers, Intermediaries, & Investors content Non-Client Users Barriers to Value Perception Shareholders, Regulators, Recruits Co Maintain  Inconsistent research content & Journalists Integrity &  Sub-standard user experience Reputation Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 10
  19. Recommendations by Theme  Develop an information taxonomy and ontology 1 Information Retrieval  Extend metadata collection  Implement a robust search architecture  Build user-centric search interfaces 2  Implement a services-based architecture with a well defined business tier Growth Capacity  Standardize information supply chain, leveraging Module-3 designs, infrastructure and investment 3  Develop a unified service delivery platform User Centric Design  Consolidate & standardize content  Create a user-centric site structure 4  Unify core web site and regional sites Global Site Strategy  Support multiple approaches to affiliate site integration  Support translation of research content as needed 5 Governance  Establish cross-discipline oversight groups  Formalize product consistency "checkpoints" Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 11
  20. 36-Month Roadmap Phase 1: Foundation & Usability Phase 2: Consolidation & Scalability Phase 3: Integration & Flexibility Track 1: Information Retrieval Architecture, Design, Metadata Collection Metadata Collection Metadata Collection POC & Vendor Selection Baseline Automation Support Social Tagging Taxonomy/Metadata Taxonomy/Metadata Taxonomy/Metadata Mgmt. Baseline Mgmt. Automation Support Mgmt. Social Tagging Search Search Search Baseline Term Expansion Key Identification Track 2: Unified Service Delivery UE Site Architecture UE Core Web Site Aggregated Market-Centric Pages Diff. & Design POC Implementation Migration Data Architecture Product Migration Planning Foundation Imp. Track 3: Global Site Support Country/Lang Affiliate Integration Selector Support Migration Global Site Migration Planning Improved Local Language Support Track 4: Governance Governance Tax./Ont. Content/Publication UE Governance Arch Governance Ongoing Governance & Oversight Planning Governance Governance Product Lifecycle Process Improvement Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 12
  21. Information Retrieval Goals and Recommendations Goals Recommendations  Provide enhanced support for related  Develop an information research identification and retrieval taxonomy and ontology  Implement robust document and content  Extend metadata collection categorization to enable more effective keyword searches  Implement a robust search architecture  Enable efficient topical searching of all  Build user-centric search documents and content interfaces  Develop advanced search capabilities that align to industry best practices Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 13
  22. Information Retrieval Build User-Centric Search Interfaces Integrated and full-featured search interfaces will increase the effectiveness of Client search Current State Future State Search Suggestions (i.e. Did you N/A mean?) Matching Issuers Client.com (grouped by business line) Search Results Did you mean? Refine Search Matching Issuers Matching Research Save Search (Document Title) Matching Research Other Results Modify Alerts Matching Research (Full Text) Other Matches (i.e. site content, N/A products, etc…) Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 14
  23. Information Retrieval Build User-Centric Search Interfaces Integrated and full-featured search interfaces will increase the effectiveness of Client search Current State Future State Integrate Search Suggestions (i.e. Did you Results N/A • Improves mean?) usability of the search interfaces • Increases the probability of finding the Matching Issuers Client.com desired result (grouped by business line) Search Results Did you mean? Refine Search Matching Issuers Matching Research Save Search (Document Title) Matching Research Other Results Modify Alerts Matching Research (Full Text) Other Matches (i.e. site content, N/A products, etc…) Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 14
  24. Information Retrieval Build User-Centric Search Interfaces Integrated and full-featured search interfaces will increase the effectiveness of Client search Current State Future State Integrate Suggest Search Suggestions (i.e. Did you Results Alternate N/A • Improves Searches mean?) usability of the Provides search interfaces alternate • Increases the search terms probability of such as finding the corrections Matching Issuers Client.com desired result of CRSspelled (grouped by business line) Search Results words Did you mean? Refine Search Matching Issuers Matching Research Save Search (Document Title) Matching Research Other Results Modify Alerts Matching Research (Full Text) Other Matches (i.e. site content, N/A products, etc…) Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 14
  25. Information Retrieval Build User-Centric Search Interfaces Integrated and full-featured search interfaces will increase the effectiveness of Client search Current State Future State Integrate Suggest Group Search Suggestions (i.e. Did you Results Alternate Results N/A • Improves Searches Provides mean?) usability of the Provides user with search interfaces alternate context to • Increases the search terms help probability of such as interpret finding the corrections result sets Matching Issuers Client.com desired result of CRSspelled (grouped by business line) Search Results words Did you mean? Refine Search Matching Issuers Matching Research Save Search (Document Title) Matching Research Other Results Modify Alerts Matching Research (Full Text) Other Matches (i.e. site content, N/A products, etc…) Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 14
  26. Information Retrieval Build User-Centric Search Interfaces Integrated and full-featured search interfaces will increase the effectiveness of Client search Current State Future State Integrate Suggest Group Search Suggestions (i.e. Did you Results Alternate Results N/A • Improves Searches Provides mean?) usability of the Provides user with search interfaces alternate context to • Increases the search terms help probability of such as interpret finding the corrections result sets Matching Issuers Client.com desired result of CRSspelled (grouped by business line) Search Results words Did you mean? Refine Search Matching Issuers Matching Research Save Search (Document Title) Matching Research Other Results Modify Alerts Matching Research (Full Text) Provide Other Matches • Includes non- Other Matches research (i.e. site content, N/A document products, etc…) content such as Rating Definitions eliminating need for users to know what content is and is not searched Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 14
  27. Information Retrieval Build User-Centric Search Interfaces Integrated and full-featured search interfaces will increase the effectiveness of Client search Current State Future State Integrate Suggest Group Search Suggestions (i.e. Did you Results Alternate Results N/A • Improves Searches Provides mean?) usability of the Provides user with search interfaces alternate context to • Increases the search terms help probability of such as interpret finding the corrections result sets Matching Issuers Client.com desired result of CRSspelled (grouped by business line) Search Results words Did you mean? Refine Search Matching Issuers Matching Research Save Search (Document Title) Matching Research Other Results Modify Alerts Matching Research (Full Text) Provide Other Support Derivative Matches Actions • Includes non- • Allows refinement of Other Matches research search criteria based (i.e. site content, N/A document on initial results products, etc…) content such as • Enables saving search Rating Definitions criteria for future use eliminating need • Provides framework to for users to modify alerts know what content preferences based on is and is search results (and/ not searched or setup RSS feeds) Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 14
  28. Understanding Audiences Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 15
  29. Audiences: Overview of User Groups Customers Users (non paying) Client Services Client Analysts This group utilizes Client.com to This group includes the range of support diverse purposes This group provides Client.com Client analysts create the Client.com customers, from inlcuding research and customers with service and valuable research and data Ratings Advisors to Credit regulation, that are not support for the research and data delivered to customers via Analysts and Portfolio Managers connected to a credit issue or or analytics offerings delivered Client.com. Client Analysts other buying or selling decision. via the web site. It includes specialize in a particular area of customer facing roles, as well as the market, and often have IT staff, and Issuer Relations. contact with customers needing additional clarification or insight into Client actions and viewpoints. Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 99 Joe Lamantia 16
  30. “Personas” Client Analysts Group 4 Access to all types of information is needed at every moment of every day Analysts Needs/Goals •Easy access to research written by other Client analysts •Views of underlying data to support analysis when talking with customers •Ability to monitor publications on topics and industries related to their expertise Analysts Key Opportunities •Change perceptions of IR effectiveness by creating focused tools for specialized IR needs •Create focused tools for other job needs, such as document management •Provide cross-reference capabilities Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 17
  31. “Access to all types of information is needed at every moment of every day.” Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 18
  32. Track Differentiation Breadth vs. Depth Track 1 took a deep dive into the requirements surrounding information retrieval, while Track 2 took a broader and shallower view of the entire set of requirements. Breadth Track 2: U.S.D. Key Phase 1 Phase 2 Depth Phase 3 Track 1: Info Complete Scope Retrieval Client.com Track 2: Track 3: Products Global Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 21
  33. Understanding Experiences Why are people here? What are they doing? Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 22
  34. Design Research
  35. Design Research Declarative Demonstrative
  36. Design Research Structured Open Declarative Demonstrative
  37. Design Research Structured Open Declarative Demonstrative Quantitative Qualitative
  38. Design Research Structured Open Declarative Demonstrative Quantitative Qualitative Individual Group
  39. Design Research Structured Open Declarative Demonstrative Quantitative Qualitative Descriptive Predictive Individual Group
  40. Research Techniques Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 24
  41. Research Techniques Customer interviews Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 24
  42. Research Techniques Customer interviews Site visits Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 24
  43. Research Techniques Customer interviews Site visits Contextual inquiry Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 24
  44. Research Techniques Customer interviews Site visits Contextual inquiry Log analysis Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 24
  45. Research Techniques Customer interviews Site visits Contextual inquiry Log analysis Query logs Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 24
  46. Research Techniques Customer interviews Site visits Contextual inquiry Log analysis Query logs Heuristic review Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 24
  47. Research Techniques Customer interviews Site visits Contextual inquiry Log analysis Query logs Heuristic review Usability testing Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 24
  48. Research Techniques Customer interviews Site visits Contextual inquiry Log analysis Query logs Heuristic review Usability testing Expert interviews Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 24
  49. Research Techniques Customer interviews Site visits Contextual inquiry Log analysis Query logs Heuristic review Usability testing Expert interviews Concept mapping Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 24
  50. Research Techniques Customer interviews Site visits Contextual inquiry Log analysis Query logs Heuristic review Usability testing Expert interviews Concept mapping Task analysis Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 24
  51. Method: Understanding Goals Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 25
  52. Design Research
  53. Design Research Declarative Demonstrative
  54. Design Research Structured Open Declarative Demonstrative
  55. Design Research Structured Open Declarative Demonstrative Quantitative Qualitative
  56. Design Research Structured Open Declarative Demonstrative Quantitative Qualitative Individual Group
  57. Design Research Structured Open Declarative Demonstrative Quantitative Qualitative Descriptive Predictive Individual Group
  58. Grounded Theory If your research goal is accurate description, then another method should be chosen since Grounded Theory is not a descriptive method. Instead it has the goal of generating concepts that explain people’s actions regardless of time and place. The descriptive parts of a GT are there mainly to illustrate the concepts. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grounded_theory Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 27
  59. Grounded Theory What most differentiates grounded theory from much other research is that it is explicitly emergent.  It does not test a hypothesis.  It sets out to find what theory accounts for the research situation as it is.  The aim, as Glaser in particular states it, is to discover the theory implicit in the data. Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 28
  60. Design Research Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 29
  61. Interviews Raw Goals Root Goals Objects Concrete Goals
  62. Understanding User Goals Raw Goals Read operating guidelines Scan technical support requests Review installation instructions Review technical specifications Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 31
  63. Understanding User Goals Root Goal Review “To examine in detail” Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 32
  64. User Goals Assess means to make a judgement or decision about, considering relevant factors Compare means to review the similarities and differences of two or more examples of the same type of thing by looking at them in detail Find means to learn the location and status of Identify means to distinguish by the use of specific criteria Locate means to become aware of where and how a thing may be found, and / or contacted. Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 33
  65. User Goals Monitor means to track the status and location of Obtain means to acquire and retain for other purposes Review means to examine in detail Save means to store and keep See means to be presented with in a manner that makes assumed relationships or characteristics apparent Understand means to consider all available points of view or sources of information on a topic / item / situation, and formulate an opinion and frame of reference for oneʼs own purposes. Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 34
  66. Understanding User Goals Objects (Nouns) Analyst report Rating Insurer Issuer Security Rating Type Country Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 35
  67. Concept Maps Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 36
  68. Modes Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 37
  69. Understanding User Goals Concrete Goal “Root goal + [object]” Review ratings Review issuers Review securities Review reports Review rating types Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 38
  70. User Goals Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 39
  71. “When you come to a fork in the road... ...take it.”
  72. Exercise: Interviews Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 41
  73. Situation Your company • Helps people buy and sell property • Rates the value of properties, and analyzes the property market for the whole world • You offer these ratings and reports online • Customers pay for access to the reports and ratings • You will improve the on-line tools people use to find reports and ratings. Audiences & Customers • Buyers want to purchase properties • Sellers want to sell their properties • Brokers want to help buy and sell properties for clients Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 42
  74. Interviewing Get people to tell stories Ask open questions: Who? How? When? Active listening, not leading. Reach for depth, context & richness. Extend: And then? After that? What else? Broaden: Similar to / like ____? Examples: An example is _____? Detail: Specifically ____? Background: Why? Because...? Negation: You donʼt ___? Why not? Test: Never? Always? Everyone? Doublecheck: You said _____. Is that right? Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 43
  75. Interview! Listen for repeated / similar tasks Identify verbs Identify nouns Emotions = importance Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 44
  76. Understanding User Goals Concrete Goal “Root goal + [object]” Review ratings Review issuers Review securities Review reports Review rating types Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 45
  77. Understanding Needs What root goals did you hear? What objects? What concrete goals? Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 46
  78. Findings Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 47
  79. User Feedback Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 48
  80. Understanding Experiences Why are people here? Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 49
  81. Understanding Experiences “To retrieve information” Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 50
  82. Understanding Experiences What are they doing? Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 51
  83. Understanding Experiences “Retrieving information” Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 52
  84. User Goals Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 53
  85. Break (5 min) Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 54
  86. Understanding Experiences How do they __? Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 55
  87. Modes cross-channel & cross-media interaction centric emerge from user behavior group diverse activities Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 56
  88. Modes Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 57
  89. Modes “…a broad but identifiable method, mood, or manner that is not tied exclusively to a particular form or genre.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mode_(literature) Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 58
  90. Modes 4 Modes of Information Retrieval Seeking & Finding Visiting Stable Destinations Monitoring Taking Delivery Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 59
  91. Modes Seeking & Finding The seeking mode focuses on traditional searching, but includes other activities such as narrowing sets using cumulative parameters, finding with/in faceted systems. Seeking & Finding The key characteristic of seeking mode is that, users bring the situations and contexts (like search results) they encounter into existence by seeking them out. When seeking, users encounter fluid destinations within the larger information environment based on what they are looking for, and how they are looking for it. A classic example of seeking mode is a user who poses an ad- hoc query via a search interface, and sorts through the list of search results returned in response. Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 60
  92. Modes Seeking & Finding Finding could take the form of active searching by posing queries to a search-style input experience. Seeking & Finding could also take the form of refining a list of potentially Finding useful items based on facets of the content. Users may not know in advance what finding activities will yield. Users may receive a set of search results that includes many different types of items, from many different authors or content sources that conceptually relate to what they began looking for based on mappings of terms and concepts. Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 61
  93. Modes Visiting Stable Destinations When visiting stable destinations, users encounter stable places within the information environment that exist regardless of the user's activities. Visiting Stable Destinations Destinations will offer users a set of things they know in advance and expect to encounter. Persistence could be conceptual only, reflected in navigation elements, or made part of the user experience via any number of mechanisms. All destinations have a focus of some kind, such as a topic, or product, or event, and may be defined by the intersection of several focuses, such as products or documents created by one person that are related to a topic or event. Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 66
  94. Modes Visiting Stable Destinations Destinations could take the form of pages that assemble content, research, ratings, and functionality either dynamically based on business rules and profile information or manually selected by Visiting Stable Client.com staff or the users. Destinations Destinations will likely change based on business rules and user context, as well as changes in the items available within the environment. A good example of a stable destination is the Arts page of the New York Time online; the articles and the art they concern change constantly, yet users know what to expect when they visit. The page is a visible part of the environment conceptually (as a category) and in terms of navigation, and is easily accessible directly from outside the environment. Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 67
  95. Modes Monitoring Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 70
  96. Modes Monitoring Monitoring effectively extends the user experience and information retrieval capabilities beyond the boundaries of the originating environment, and allows users to know in advance what they will find or encounter when they enter the environment. Monitoring For example, a user may wish to monitor the publications concerning an issue in their portfolio; while the contents of new publications would vary, every notification they receive would concern a known issue. Monitoring requires messages or communication tokens, commonly email, RSS, or SMS, but could take many other forms as well. Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 71
  97. Modes Delivery In this mode, users do not have to enter the environment at all to retrieve information, enabling them to further goals without increasing acquisition costs or effort. Delivery Delivery could take the form of packages of documents or other content dispatched to users via numerous channels, such as RSS, email, SMS, etc. Receiving delivered items is the least active mode we defined for users, allowing them to retrieve information without actively seeking, visiting a destination, or monitoring the environment. Good examples of delivered information are the iconic stock ticker, RSS feeds for blog postings, and email publications. Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 73
  98. Modes Monitoring Seeking Fluidity Visiting Stable Delivery Destinations Activity Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 75
  99. Other Modes Environment: transactional, siloed Creative Social Collaborative Competitive Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 76
  100. What is the experience? Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 77
  101. Scenarios Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 78
  102. Scenarios Forward looking Narrative Communicate Vision Speaks local language Persona > Goal = Experience Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 79
  103. Understanders and Decision Makers Scenario: Evaluate New Issue William C. | Credit Analyst Customer evaluates new issue quickly William, a Credit Analyst, William turns to Client.com, The destination lists initial The issue destination also sees in his Bloomberg and searches for information ratings and research for the offers a list of peer issuers console that a hospital he on the issue by entering the issue. (similar hospitals, or in the watches has offered a new CUSIP. same region), as well as issue. William also finds the most their senior un-secured William is taken directly to recent publications on the ratings. the destination for the new issuer and the industry the issue. issuer belongs to, and a link A summary and extract of F to the destination for the F F Client most recent credit S issuer. S opinion on the issue and S issuer appears as well. William reads the summaries, considers the ratings, and formulates an opinion about the new issue based on the collected information Client.com presented. F S IR Modes Referenced F Finding M Monitoring S Stable Destination D Delivery Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 49 Joe Lamantia 80
  104. Research and Ratings Originators Scenario: Rate New Issuer Rebecca M. | Client Analyst Client Analyst understands new domain to rate a new issuer Rebecca is a Banking Analyst Rebecca visits the Latin With an overview of the Rebecca visits the for Client, focused on Latin American banking group activity in her field by other destination for the Japanese American banks. She needs destination. She is offered analysts,Rebecca moves on parent. to rate a new issuer - a links to destinations for new to the linked new issuer Chilean bank whose parent issuers, all analysts tracking page, which collects all Here she reviews current company is domiciled in Latin American banks, and recent publications ratings and the ratings Japan. recent rating actions taken concerning the issuer, shows history for the parent, as on issues in Latin American the latest rating available for well as a summary of the Rating this issuer requires banking. the Japanese parent most recent credit outlook Rebecca to understand S company, and links to the S and credit opinion Client has S subjects outside her destination for the parent published about the parent. expertise. company. Rebecca has stronger She visits the destination for Rebecca contacts two of the context, but would like to Latin America, which analysts, to discuss specific speak with someone who identifies appropriate questions on economic knows more about Latin analysts from the Sovereign factors in Latin America, and American regional Group, and offers recently trends in Chile’s fiscal policy. economics, and Chilean fiscal published research policy. discussing major trends in With her more complete econoimc development understanding, Rebecca is across the region. confident she can rate the S Chilean issuer properly. S IR Modes Referenced F Finding M Monitoring S Stable Destination D Delivery Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 50 Joe Lamantia 81
  105. Reference Users Scenario: Researching Complex Topic Peter N. | Corporate Librarian Non-expert assembles research on complex topic Peter, a Corporate Librarian, Peter logs on to Client.com. The returned results suggest The results list items for must respond to a request This is a new topic he has that Peter would be Peter’s query, and the special from an Analyst for the not researched before, so he interested in a special topic, topic Asian Financial Crisis. research that Client has chooses to directly enter a “The Asian Financial Crisis”. He saves links to both topics. published on the after effects query for “asian currency of the Asian currency collapse effects” covering all The results also provide Peter can search again, collapse. types of research. Peter suggestions for related automatically using the special topics, such as special topics as a basis for F “Korean Financial Market”, F F the new query, applying and links to destinations for S additional parameters to the S all suggested special topics. combined query as needed. Peter refines the query, Peter sorts the returned Peter includes the saved using terms related to the results by date, and filters links to the special topic request such as corporate out several types of destinations in his response governance, and setting the publications he does not to the analyst’s request. scope to specific countries need to satisfy the request, the analyst is interested in, and chooses five pieces of Peter dispatches the such as Korea and research to download at downloaded files to the Singapore. once, in the format the analyst. F analyst prefers. F IR Modes Referenced F Finding M Monitoring S Stable Destination D Delivery Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 51 Joe Lamantia 82
  106. Understanders and Decision Makers Scenario: Monitor Portfolio (Activity / Research) Anike W. | Portfolio Manager Track research published across portfolio of issuers Anike manages a portfolio of Anike regularly visits the Anike’s group destinations Anike needs to know credit issues from a large destinations for her groups provide a list of recent rating immediately of any changes number of issuers. She has to see what new research of actions for her issuers, in the outlook for one issuer created several groups of interest to her is available. gather links to all new in the news for potential issuers on Client.com to help research of chosen types on difficulties. her monitor the changes in the issues, list industries Client view of the issues and covered by the group, She creates an alert that will issuers in her portfolios. indicate new research send her notice of an rating published on the issuers, and action or new research S S offer destinations for the S mentioning this issuer or S M M regions where issues are M issue. M domiciled. Anike may need to change the mix in her portfolio. Her groups destination includes a cross-reference link to information on three issuers in her group offered by the Market Implied Ratings product. Anike’s firm may purchase S MIR, so she follows the link. M IR Modes Referenced F Finding M Monitoring S Stable Destination D Delivery Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 52 Joe Lamantia 83
  107. Reference Users Scenario: Customer Support Margaret T. | Client Service Desk Service desk assists customer A frustrated customer calls Margaret locates the Annual She offers to explain three She explains where the list the Client Service Desk to Default Report in the list of easy ways to obtain the appears at key locations retrieve the Annual Default “Most Requested Items” study that are faster than throughout Client.com, such Study, without checking calling. as the home page. Client.com. Margaret asks what file format the customer prefers. Margaret recommends using She tells the customer how After many failed attempts in the “Most Requested Items” to directly download the the past, the customer She emails the Annual list which gathers the most latest version of the ADR and refuses to try finding things Default Study to the needed publications across other commonly needed on Client.com… customer. S all business lines and S publications in a variety of S document types. file formats. Margaret also tells the She describes different The customer asks how to The customer thanks customer how to bookmark delivery channels for the set this up. Margaret for making things the destination page for the alerts, email, RSS, etc. easier to find without Annual Default Study, where Margaret guides the mistakes, wasted time, or the latest version is always The customer does not want customer through setting up making many phone calls. available. to receive any additional a subscription to the Annual alerts. Default Report by activating She explains how the Margaret explains how the this feature (from the customer can set an alert to customer can have the latest bookmarked destination be notified when the Annual S version of the Annual Default page, or other locations). Default study is updated. M Study automatically sent M out. D D IR Modes Referenced F Finding M Monitoring S Stable Destination D Delivery Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 53 Joe Lamantia 84
  108. Understanders and Decision Makers Scenario: Understand & Interpret Methodology Simon L. | Ratings Advisor Customer quickly locates methodology documents Simon, a ratings advisor at Simon logs on to Client.com. Simon wants a longer term Simon quickly locates the an investment bank, needs Simon is presented with view of Client methodologies methodology publications to understand Client method recent and frequently for structured finance. He pertaining to asset backed for rating asset backed requested publications in the navigates to the linked securities. securities.. area of structured finance, destination for all based on his role, profile, methodology publications, He selects several that meet and interests. and focuses on the segment his needs, indicates that he for structured finance. wants them added to a new packet of documents for S S later use. S M M Simon chooses to download On the methodologies page, Simon begins listening to the He follows the link to the the methodology documents Simon sees a reference to a recorded, to see if he should destination page for the immediately, as well as save recorded Client briefing on listen to the entire briefing analyst, to see if the analyst the packet for later. emerging markets now, later, or at all. has written any interesting methodologies. publications recently. He reviews the packet, While listening, Simon chooses the file format, and He reviews the summary of recognizes the name of a Simon stops and bookmarks downloads the individual files the briefing. It includes a list Client analyst in the list of the recorded briefing for all at the same time. of the other topics addressed participants. later, and begins to review S in the call, as well as the S S the downloaded S agenda and Client methodology documents. participants. IR Modes Referenced F Finding M Monitoring S Stable Destination D Delivery Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 54 Joe Lamantia 85
  109. Using Scenarios Challenges • Making the scenarios comprehensive across tasks and user types, given the large number of user types in the User Needs Matrix • Incorporating personas that illustrated differences in how users might interact with the system • Differences in the usersʼ end goals and job requirements • Client requested modifications very late in the process Findings • Scenarios support an overall vision of customer experience and solution • Technical clients often to try to mold scenarios into use cases Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 86
  110. What is the offering? Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 87
  111. IR Requirements Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 88
  112. Narrative Continuity Narrative Continuity Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 89
  113. Narrative Continuity e tiv ra ar N er m to us C Narrative Continuity Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 89
  114. Narrative Continuity e tiv rio ra na ar N ce er S m nt to re us ur C C Narrative Continuity Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 89
  115. Narrative Continuity e tiv rio ra io na ar ar N ce en er S Sc m nt on to re us si ur Vi C C Narrative Continuity Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 89
  116. Narrative Continuity t en m e re tiv ui rio ra io eq na ar ar lR N ce en na er S Sc m tio nt on to re nc us si ur Fu Vi C C Narrative Continuity Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 89
  117. Narrative Continuity t en m e re tiv ui rio ra io eq na ar ar lR N ce en na er S e Sc as m tio nt on C to re nc us se si ur Fu Vi U C C Narrative Continuity Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 89
  118. Narrative Continuity t en m e re tiv ui rio ra io eq na ar ar lR N ce en na er e S e Sc as as m tio nt tC on C to re nc us se si ur s Fu Te Vi U C C Narrative Continuity Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 89
  119. Patterns Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 90
  120. Patterns Repeated combinations of the modes Longer-term perspective on behavior Clarify experience value Identify strategic opportunity Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 91
  121. Desire path From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia A desire path (or desire line) is a path developed by erosion caused by animal or human footfall. The path usually represents the shortest or most easily navigated route between an origin and destination. The width and amount of erosion of the line represents the amount of demand. The term was coined by Gaston Bachelard in his book The Poetics of Space.[1] Desire paths can usually be found as shortcuts where constructed pathways take a circuitous route. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desire_path
  122. Desire path From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia A desire path (or desire line) is a path developed by erosion caused by animal or human footfall. The path usually represents the shortest or most easily navigated route between an origin and destination. The width and amount of erosion of the line represents the amount of demand. The term was coined by Gaston Bachelard in his book The Poetics of Space.[1] Desire paths can usually be found as shortcuts where constructed pathways take a circuitous route. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desire_path
  123. Information Retrieval Patterns Seeker The Seeker is looking for something. Once found, the Seeker goes elsewhere to accomplish other goals. Visiting Stable Seeking Destinations Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 93
  124. Example Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 94
  125. Information Retrieval Patterns Regular Customer The Regular Customer visits the same destination(s) consistently for the same reasons. Then the Regular Customer realizes they can save the time and effort of visiting, and switches modes to have the things they need delivered directly to them. Visiting Stable Delivery Destinations Designing the Experience of Information Retrieval : Janus Boye Conference 2009 Joe Lamantia 95

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