English civil war 1213

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  • English civil war 1213

    1. 1. “The state of Monarchy is the supremest thing upon earth...” “God Hath the power to create or destroy” God is able to judge all and to be judged by none...” “Make them beggars or rich at his pleasure...”“The King is due both the affection of the soul and the service of the body of his subjects”
    2. 2. “The state of Monarchy is the supremest thing upon earth...” “God Hath the power to create or destroy” God is able to judge all and to be judged by none...” “Make them beggars or rich at his pleasure...”“The King is due both the affection of the soul and the service of the body of his subjects” What appears to be James’ view of the king, God, and power?
    3. 3. Now concerning the ancient rights of the subjects of this realm, chiefly consisting in the privileges of this House of Parliament,the misinformation openly delivered to your majesty hath been in three things: First, that we held not privileges of right, but of [your] grace only, renewed every parliament by way of donation upon petition, and so to be limited. Secondly, that we are no Court of Record, nor yet a Court that can command view of records, but that our proceedings here are only to acts and memorials, and that the attendance with the records is courtesy, not duty. Thirdly, and lastly, that the examination of the return of writs for knights and burgesses is without our compass and due only to the Chancery.
    4. 4. “first, that our privileges and liberties are our right and due inheritance, no less than our very lands and goods.” limited” “...they cannot be withheld from us, denied, or impaired, but with apparent wrong to the whole state of the realm.”“we, the knights, citizens, and burgesses of the House of Commonsassembled in parliament, and in the name of the whole commons ofthe realm of England, with uniform consent for ourselves and ourposterity, do expressly protest, as being derogatory in the highestdegree to the true dignity, liberty, and authority of your MajestysHigh Court of Parliament, and consequently to the rights of all yourMajestys said subjects and the whole body of this our kingdom: Anddesire that this our protestation may be recorded to all posterity.
    5. 5. GroupsCourtneyAnne NelsonDustinJesseCaseyKatharineElmBlakeWillKatieHarryLilaNathanMaiahConorJohn
    6. 6. Timeline of the English Civil War 7 4 Queen Elizabeth dies. James I becomes king. Charles I introduces new taxes including Ship Money, as he needs cash 9 THE GUNPOWER PLOT A plot to blow up Parliament and the king 12 Scotland is angry with Charles about religion and decides to invade England. 10 Charles I becomes king. 11 Charles I needs to call Parliament back. Again, he needs the cash. 3 Charles I marries a Catholic- Henrietta Maria from France. 1 The GRAND REMONSTRANCE- Parliament complains to Charles about the things he has done. 2Charles is still quarreling with Parliament after his first few years as king. 6 Charles I goes to Parliament to arrest 5 leading members. 8 Charles I begins to rule without Parliament 5 Charles I heads north to raise an army. Civil war begins.
    7. 7. Causes of the English Civil War
    8. 8. Causes of the English Civil War• What two sides fought in the English Civil War? Who/what did they represent?
    9. 9. Causes of the English Civil War• What two sides fought in the English Civil War? Who/what did they represent?• On what fundamental questions did the crown and Parliament disagree?
    10. 10. Causes of the English Civil War• What two sides fought in the English Civil War? Who/what did they represent?• On what fundamental questions did the crown and Parliament disagree? • From where do Parliament and the King derive their powers?
    11. 11. Causes of the English Civil War• What two sides fought in the English Civil War? Who/what did they represent?• On what fundamental questions did the crown and Parliament disagree? • From where do Parliament and the King derive their powers? • Is the King subject to or above the law?
    12. 12. Causes of the English Civil War Multiple Kingdoms Financial ProblemsReligious Division
    13. 13. Causes of the English Civil War
    14. 14. Determining POV
    15. 15. Determining POVHere we are going to speculate on a historical actor’s POV given his background and historical context...
    16. 16. Determining POV
    17. 17. Historical Context... The year is 1629, and Charles I continues to quarrel with Parliament over money and theirrespective powers. Parliament has just passed thePetition of Right, first put forward by Sir Thomas Wentworth who has recently been arrested and imprisoned for not paying a forced loan to the king. Angered by the Petition of Right andParliaments insistence that his collection of ShipMoney and other customs duties is a violation of the Petition, Charles orders Parliamentsdissolution and decides to lead without the body. People must decide whether they are for King or Country...
    18. 18. Background: MerchantYour name is James Goodsell. You are a successful middle class merchant and live in a comfortable home in town. You are in the textile business and your job is to put out yarn to the cottage industries(weavers) in the countryside (individual households that own the means of production) where theyweave fabric, then you pay the weavers and sell the woven fabric abroad for a profit. You do not caremuch about religion, but your wife and two sons are all devoted Puritans.
    19. 19. Background: NobleYour name is James Uppingham. By birthright you are a knighted lord, a member of the nobility. Youare very rich and own a great deal of land, and livein both the town and country. Moreover, you are amember of Parliament. You are a devout, traditionalCatholic and you believe that England should have a strong, powerful king and that subjects owe him their allegiance.
    20. 20. Background: Gentry Your name is John Blenheim. You are a member of the Gentry and live in the countryside. You own land and are responsible for looking after the villages in your area. You are proud of your status. Though not of noble birth, through hard work anddiligence your family has attained a very high social status just below the hereditary Nobles. Your workethic reflects strict Puritan discipline, and belief that the King is ordained by God and enforces Gods morality on earth.
    21. 21. A Cavalier• Believes in the Divine Right of Kings• Agrees that Charles has the right to take taxes such as ship money and grant monopolies when desired• Supports the bishops and agrees with Archbishop Laud’s reforms of the Church of England• Thinks that people ought to obey the king and that it is wrong to go to war against him.
    22. 22. A Roundhead• Believes that Parliament should make the laws and govern the nation• Believes in the principle of no taxation without Parliament’s consent• Hates the bishops and wants Puritan reforms to make the Church of England more Protestant• Has no personal loyalty to the king, and believes that there is no need to obey the king if he is wrong.
    23. 23. Supporter No.1• I am a farmer. I believe in the Divine Right of Kings, but my son is a soldier fighting on Parliament’s side.
    24. 24. Supporter No. 2• I am a Catholic nobleman. I believe England should have a strong, powerful king.
    25. 25. Supporter No. 3• I am a merchant. I don’t really care that much about religion, but my wife is a devoted Puritan.
    26. 26. Supporter No. 4• I am a Puritan nobleman. I believe that the King is sent by God and must be obeyed.
    27. 27. Supporter No. 5• I am a Puritan and recently was arrested for not paying Ship Money.

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