Thinking Differently. Enabling Innovation - Buffalo Business First Event

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Competitive demands require quicker, more effective and innovative problem solving. Problem solvers are required to quickly provide solutions to increasingly complex problems, develop and design new and innovative products and processes – and at the same time, reduce operating time and costs.
Creative thinking is a critical skill required by all people within their roles at work. It is often done by trial and error – the thinker creates an idea and determines if it will work. Not only is trial and error limited by personal knowledge, thinking is also constrained by a “stuckness” in how things are and how they should be.

Join us as Michael Cardus, founder of Create-Learning Team Building & Leadership Inc. teaches you how to break through these barriers and reach your creative potential!

Innovation Workshop Focus:
· Diminished “stuckness” in your thinking
· Increased pace of problem solving
· More effective discussions with others to help them think differently
· Increased use of existing resources and knowledge to innovate solutions
www.create-learning.com

Published in: Education, Technology

Thinking Differently. Enabling Innovation - Buffalo Business First Event

  1. 1. Thinking Differently. Enabling Innovation. #BFLOInnov8
  2. 2. www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
  3. 3. What’s in it for me? Having fun & learning Understand what causes “stuckness” in thinking Learn & apply tools to get people “unstuck” Understand the 5 levels of Inventive Problems Learn & apply Innovation Tools Ways to best use these Innovation tools with teams, individuals and stakeholders  Contact me, I want to help www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
  4. 4. http://www.gapingvoidart.com/ www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
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  6. 6. “If you have been trained to think in a certain way and are a member of a group that thinks the same way, how can you imagine changing to a new way of thinking?” - Edgar Schein www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
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  9. 9. http://www.gapingvoidart.com/ www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
  10. 10. What is Innovation? o3 Minutes: Generate a Pool of Concepts o12 Minutes: Develop Concepts o3 Minutes: Make Presentation www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
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  13. 13. Choose 1 that your team did really well. Specifically, what did they do well? How was that useful? Choose 1 that your team did not do so well. Specifically, what would ‘better’ have looked like? www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
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  16. 16. Quick TRIZ: Theory of inventive problem solving. • Created in 1940 by G.S Altschuller • Initially reviewed ~200,000 patents to understand how inventive solutions are created. To date over 3 million have been reviewed and the original results have stayed essentially the same. www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
  17. 17. 5 Levels of Inventiveness: Altschuller determined 5 levels with level 1 being basic and level 5 being highly innovative patents that required new technology. Levels only indicate how difficult a problem is to solve, higher levels requiring more knowledge from outside sources; truly outside-the-box. Trials = estimation of the number of trials it may take to obtain a solution using trail and error. www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
  18. 18. Level 1 = 32% of patents; Less than 10 trials. o Example: Narrow hull the ship is unstable. Solution: use a wider hull. Level 1 does not change the system substantially. Level 2 = 45% of patents; up to 100 trials. o Not well known within the industry or technology. No need for knowledge outside of the industry and requires creative thinking for the solution. Level 3 = 18% of patents; up to 1000 trials. o Significant improvements are made to an existing system. The solution requires using engineering knowledge from other industries and technology. Level 4 = 4% of patents; up to 10,000 trials. o Solution uses science that is new to that industry or technology. Usually involves a radical new principle of operation. Level 5 = Less than 1%; over 10 million trials. o Solutions involve discoveries of new scientific phenomena or a new scientific discovery. www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
  19. 19. Many problems can be solved by changing – widening our perception. www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
  20. 20. www.create-learning.com Image http://www.flickr.com/photos/speednutdave/2839923659/ - Michael Cardus
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  22. 22. TRIZ tools can work to release Psychological Inertia AKA Mental / Organizational Stuckness www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
  23. 23. PSYCHOLOGICAL INERTIA. The psychological meaning of the word "inertia" implies an indisposition to change – a certain "stuckness" due to human programming. It represents the inevitability of behaving in a certain way – the way that has been indelibly inscribed somewhere in the brain. It also represents the impossibility – as long as a person is guided by his habits – of ever behaving in a better way. – Kowalick www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
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  25. 25. Routine causes of psychological inertia; Having a fixed vision (or model) of the solution or root cause. False assumptions (trusting the data). Language that is a strong carrier of psychological inertia. Specific terminology carries psychological inertia. Experience, expertise and reliance upon previous results. Limited knowledge, hidden resources or mechanisms. Inflexibility (model worship; trying to prove a specific theory, stubbornness). Using the same strategy. Keep thinking the same way and you will continue to get the same result. Rushing to a solution – incomplete thinking. www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
  26. 26. Tools to Release Innovation www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
  27. 27. Draw the Problem http://www.gogamestorm.com/?s=%22draw+the+problem%22 www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
  28. 28. http://www.gogamestorm.com/?s=%22draw+the+problem%22 www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
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  40. 40. Example: Plan for safety improvement Past Present Future Super-System Corporation where safety not a priority Corporation were message that safety is a priority has not gotten through Corporation where safety is a priority System Employees take occasional risks to get the job done Ladder slipped and employee was injured in fall Injury rate will be unacceptable Sub-System Management has criticized workers who stop production in the face of danger. Workers remember the incidents, in spite of management’s assertion that safety is paramount. Management has provided positive recognition for stopping production in the face of danger. www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
  41. 41. Plan for an increase in customer satisfaction based upon meeting with client support. Past Smaller company, Less need for product, Only phones No Internet, SoldDirectly to Customer Present Organization, Phone System, Internet, Transportation, Buyers, Wholesalers, Suppliers Future Larger organization, More product offerings, More staff, More customers, Outsourcing much of sales, Global Market System Customer phoned or physically came to the location. Meetings are scheduled according to incoming phone calls, emails, online contacts for support. Meeting happen “virtually”, more product sold = more incoming calls and contact for support, increased dependence upon “magnet & virtual” staff and locations. Sub-System phones, typewriters + file Phones, Each persons cabinets (physical tangible computer, Personal records), Only spoke Relationships, Multiple English, Only US currency Languages, Locations Super-System www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus Increased storage of records on computers, People who speak multiple languages, Translators, Done on computers
  42. 42. www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
  43. 43. www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
  44. 44. Actions to Address Common Issues That Impede Innovative Solutions;  Have new (different) people check all the data and information to provide fresh thinking.  Determine whether the conclusions can be wrong (be critical of conclusions).  Check the information, assign a specific person (owner) responsible for checking the data.  Physically check and visually witness information and data gathering rather than accepting validation from others.  Challenge methods and standards used.  Determine where potentially hidden or secondary resources might be present and how they could cause a problem  Describe a new or unusual mechanism that would have to exist to cause the problem.  Demonstrate the problem is not simply an outlier. www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
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  48. 48. The DTC Operator Algorithm  Define the problem: Name the system or the part of the system of interest.  Consider ideas created by DTC extremes: www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
  49. 49. Dimensions: If dimensions were extremely large what would success look like, how would that happen, in what way could that system be developed? List ideas/solutions: If dimensions were extremely small (almost gone) what would success look like, how would that happen, in what ways could that system be developed? List ideas/solutions: www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
  50. 50. Time: If time were extremely long what would success look like, how would that happen, in what ways could that system be developed? (i.e. Days, Years, Decades instead of seconds or minutes) OR If speed were extremely slow what would success look like, how would that happen, in what ways could that system be developed? List ideas/solutions: If time were extremely small what would success look like, how would that happen, in what ways could that system be developed? (i.e. nanoseconds instead of seconds) OR If speed were extremely fast what would success look like, how would that happen, in what ways could that system be developed? List ideas/solutions: www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
  51. 51. Cost: (Not just in terms of dollars but costs in terms of downsides, harmful effects, etc…) If there was no limit on cost how could the problem be solved, in what ways could that system be developed? List ideas/solutions: If costs were extremely limited what would success look like, how would that happen, in what ways could that system be developed? List ideas/solutions: www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
  52. 52. The DTC Operator Algorithm  Define the problem: Name the system or the part of the system of interest.  Consider ideas created by DTC extremes: www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
  53. 53. www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus
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  56. 56. Photo attribution http://www.flickr.com/photos/pasukaru76/4307189567/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/pasukaru76/3992935923/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/wingtorn/7225734766/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/antonnovoselov/4712010305/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/33263856@N02/5157196328/in/photostream/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/aidanmorgan/4763085590/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/calliope/5902712709/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/pasukaru76/5018455914/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/kurtbudiarto/7150324143/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/derekgavey/5069358550/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/a_siegel/8133716733/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Necker_cube.svg http://www.flickr.com/photos/dhilung/3311130707/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/76657755@N04/7408506410/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/jdhancock/3948724485/ www.create-learning.com - Michael Cardus

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