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Laila o ioahenua

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Laila o ioahenua

  1. 1. LAILA vs. `Ō & I`OAHENUA HAW 101
  2. 2. `Ō <ul><li>ʻŌ is used when you point out a place to a person and he/she does not know what place you are referring to. The word ‘ō is usually used with some kind of pointing gesture. </li></ul><ul><li>For example, “Your mom is over there (ʻō) in Macy’s.” The person being talked to does not know that you are referring to Macy’s when you say the word there (ʻō) as you do not mention Macy’s until later in the sentence. </li></ul><ul><li> Aia kou mamā ma ‘ō ma Macy’s. Your mom is over there in Macy’s. </li></ul>
  3. 3. LAILA <ul><li>Laila is used to refer to a place that you have already mentioned to the person you are talking to. Thus, the person should know which “there” you are referring to. </li></ul><ul><li>For example, “My auntie lives in Las Vegas. It is very hot there.” The person who is being talked to already knows that “there” in the second sentence refers to Las Vegas because you just mentioned it. </li></ul><ul><li>Noho koʻu ʻanakē ma Las Vegas. Wela loa ʻo laila. My auntie lives in Las Vegas. It is very hot there. </li></ul>
  4. 4. I`OAHENUA <ul><li>i/ma mua o _____ </li></ul><ul><li>in front of/before ______ </li></ul><ul><li>i/ma hope o _____ </li></ul><ul><li>in back/behind/after _____ </li></ul><ul><li>i/ma waena o _____ </li></ul><ul><li>in the middle of/between/among/in the center of ______ </li></ul>
  5. 5. I`OAHENUA <ul><li>i/ma luna o ______ </li></ul><ul><li>on/on top of/above _______ </li></ul><ul><li>i/ma lalo o ______ on bottom of/below/under ______ </li></ul><ul><li>i/ma loko o ______ inside of/within _______ </li></ul><ul><li>i/ma waho o ______ outside of ______ </li></ul>
  6. 6. I`OAHENUA <ul><li>i/ma uka o _______ “ma uka,” inland of _____ </li></ul><ul><li>i/ma kai o _______ “ma kai,” seaward of _______ </li></ul><ul><li>i/ma ʻō aku o _______ beyond, on the far side of _____ </li></ul><ul><li>i/ma ʻaneʻi mai o _____ this side of _______ </li></ul>
  7. 7. IMPORTANT NOTES
  8. 8. <ul><li>You may already be familiar with some iʻoahenua from place names and general conversation, as in the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Waiākea Kai Ma kai Waiākea </li></ul><ul><li>Kona Waena Central Kona </li></ul><ul><li>Kalihi Uka Ma uka Kalihi </li></ul><ul><li>Lahaina Luna Upper Lahaina </li></ul><ul><li>Kaʻieʻie Waho Outer Kaʻieʻie </li></ul><ul><li>ma kai refers to something on the side closer to the sea </li></ul><ul><li>ma uka refers to something on the side more inland </li></ul><ul><li>I mua! Forward! </li></ul>
  9. 9. NĀ LA`ANA (Examples) <ul><li>between the cars ma waena o nā kaʻa </li></ul><ul><li>My truck is between the cars Aia koʻu kalaka ma waena o nā kaʻa </li></ul><ul><li>That (f) is my truck between the cars. `O kēlā ko`u kalaka ma waena o nā ka`a. </li></ul>
  10. 10. NĀ LA`ANA (Examples) <ul><li>outside of her house ma waho o kona hale </li></ul><ul><li>Her bag is outside of her house. Aia kona `eke ma waho o kona hale. </li></ul><ul><li>There is a lot of rubbish outside of her house. Nui ka ʻōpala ma waho o kona hale. </li></ul>
  11. 11. NĀ LA`ANA (Examples) <ul><li>under the blue car ma lalo o ke kaʻa uliuli </li></ul><ul><li>The cat is under the blue car. Aia ka pōpoki ma lalo o ke kaʻa uliuli. </li></ul><ul><li>That (n) is a cat under the blue car. He pōpoki kēnā ma lalo o ke kaʻa uliuli. </li></ul>
  12. 12. NĀ LA`ANA (Examples) <ul><li>in front of Kanani ma mua o Kanani </li></ul><ul><li>They (3+) are in front of Kanani. Aia lākou ma mua o Kanani. </li></ul><ul><li>She sat in front of Kanani Ua noho ʻo ia ma mua o Kanani </li></ul><ul><li>*Note that there is no ʻokina in front of Kanani even if it is a name because the o in this case means “of” </li></ul>
  13. 13. REMINDERS <ul><li>Remember that you need a kaʻi following the iʻoahenua unless the word is an iʻoa (proper noun) or papani (pronoun). As a reminder, kaʻi are words like “the, this, that, my, your, his, her, etc.” If no kaʻi is provided in English, you should use “ka” or “ke” as appropriate as in the following example: </li></ul><ul><li>before school ma mua o ke kula </li></ul><ul><li>He cleaned his room before school Ua hoʻomaʻemaʻe ʻo ia i kona lumi ma mua o ke kula </li></ul>
  14. 14. CONTRACTIONS <ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Also note the following contractions: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>O + AU = OʻU ME </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>O + ʻOE = OU YOU </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>O + ʻO IA = ONA HIM/HER </li></ul></ul>
  15. 15. NĀ LA`ANA (Examples) <ul><li>O + AU = OʻU ME </li></ul><ul><li>in front of me i mua oʻu </li></ul><ul><li>She is in front of me. Aia ʻo ia i mua oʻu. </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
  16. 16. NĀ LA`ANA (Examples) <ul><li>O + ʻOE = OU YOU </li></ul><ul><li>behind of you ma hope ou </li></ul><ul><li>The monster is behind (of) you! Aia ka tutua ma hope ou!  </li></ul><ul><li>The monster is behind of your friend. Aia ka tutua ma hope o kou hoaaloha. </li></ul>
  17. 17. NĀ LA`ANA (Examples) <ul><ul><li>O + ʻO IA = ONA HIM/HER </li></ul></ul><ul><li>under him/her ma lalo ona </li></ul><ul><li>The blanket is under him/her. Aia ke kapa moe ma lalo ona. </li></ul><ul><li>The blanket is under his/her mom. Aia ke kapa moe ma lalo o kona māmā. </li></ul>

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