A ANOʻ ʻ
HAW 102
A ANOʻ ʻ
• As a reminder, a ano areʻ ʻ
stative verbs. As the name
implies, stative verbs refer
to a state or condition of ...
PATTERN
• When using a ano, the ami preceding theʻ ʻ ʻ
object will always be i or i .ā
A anoʻ ʻ + Subject +I/IĀ + Object
W...
A anoʻ ʻ + Subject + I/IĀ + Object
• English: The rain made my hair wet.
• Hawaiian Thinking: My hair is wet by the rain.
...
A anoʻ ʻ + Subject + I/IĀ + Object
English: Exercise is making Kau i skinny.ʻ
Hawaiian Thinking: Kau i is becoming skinn...
A anoʻ ʻ + Subject + I/IĀ + Object
• English: I cut my hand on the knife.
• Hawaiian: My hand got cut by the knife.
– A an...
IMPORTANT POINTS TO
REMEMBER
• Note that the same rules/contractions apply to
i/i as they do in other sentences:ā
–I - use...
A anoʻ ʻ + Subject + I/IĀ + Object
Example of use with papani:
English: He makes me angry.
Hawaiian thinking: I am angr...
A anoʻ ʻ + Subject + I/IĀ + Object
• Example of use with i oa:ʻ
• English: Elmo made that (f) child happy.
• Hawaiian: Tha...
SPECIAL NOTES
Aano pepeke
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Aano pepeke

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Aano pepeke

  1. 1. A ANOʻ ʻ HAW 102
  2. 2. A ANOʻ ʻ • As a reminder, a ano areʻ ʻ stative verbs. As the name implies, stative verbs refer to a state or condition of a person or an object. Examples include traits, feelings, conditions, colors, etc.
  3. 3. PATTERN • When using a ano, the ami preceding theʻ ʻ ʻ object will always be i or i .ā A anoʻ ʻ + Subject +I/IĀ + Object With this pattern, i/i can be translated as by,ā because of, with, from, makes, causes, etc.
  4. 4. A anoʻ ʻ + Subject + I/IĀ + Object • English: The rain made my hair wet. • Hawaiian Thinking: My hair is wet by the rain. – A ano: wetʻ ʻ – Subject (who/what is wet?) = my hair – Object (what caused its wetness?) = the rain • Translation: Ua pulu + ko u lauoho + i ka ua.ʻ • *Remember to look at the root of the sentence first “Pulu ko uʻ lauoho,” which means “My hair is wet.” With this type of sentence, you can translate “i/i ” as “by, from, because of,ā etc.” • *If you translated the sentence “Ua pulu ka ua i ko u lauoho,”ʻ then the translation would be “My hair made the rain wet” or “The rain is wet because of my hair.”
  5. 5. A anoʻ ʻ + Subject + I/IĀ + Object English: Exercise is making Kau i skinny.ʻ Hawaiian Thinking: Kau i is becoming skinnyʻ because of exercise.  A ano: skinnyʻ ʻ Subject (who is skinny?): Kau iʻ Object (what caused his skinniness?): exercise Translation: Ke w w nei o Kau i i ka ho oikaikaī ī ʻ ʻ ʻ kino.
  6. 6. A anoʻ ʻ + Subject + I/IĀ + Object • English: I cut my hand on the knife. • Hawaiian: My hand got cut by the knife. – A ano: cutʻ ʻ –Subject (what got cut): my hand –Object (what caused my hand to be cut?): the knife • Translation: Ua moku ko u lima i ka pahi.ʻ
  7. 7. IMPORTANT POINTS TO REMEMBER • Note that the same rules/contractions apply to i/i as they do in other sentences:ā –I - used for ka i + meme aʻ ʻ –I – used for i oa and papani with theā ʻ following noted contractions: • I + AU = IA UĀ ʻ • I + O IA = I IAĀ ʻ Ā
  8. 8. A anoʻ ʻ + Subject + I/IĀ + Object Example of use with papani: English: He makes me angry. Hawaiian thinking: I am angry by/from him.  A ano: angryʻ ʻ  Subject (who is angry?): I  Object (what caused my anger?): him Translation: Huh wau i ia.ū ā
  9. 9. A anoʻ ʻ + Subject + I/IĀ + Object • Example of use with i oa:ʻ • English: Elmo made that (f) child happy. • Hawaiian: That (f) child is happy because of Elmo. – A ano: happyʻ ʻ – Subject (who is happy?): that (f) child – Object (what caused that (f) child’s happiness?): Elmo • Translation: Hau oli k l keiki i Elmo.ʻ ē ā ā
  10. 10. SPECIAL NOTES

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