Prehospital Trauma Life Support Developed by the National Association of EMTs (NAEMT) In cooperation with The Committee on...
Lesson 1 <ul><li>Introduction  and Overview </li></ul>
Objectives <ul><li>As a result of active participation in this lesson you should be able to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recogni...
Accident vs. Disease  Is perspective important? <ul><li>Injury: being hurt or killed </li></ul><ul><li>Trauma: inflicted w...
Traumatic Injury in the U.S. <ul><li>Leading cause of death in persons ages 1 to 44 years  </li></ul><ul><li>Three times m...
Traumatic Injury Worldwide <ul><li>WHO Statistics (2000) </li></ul><ul><li>5 million people died from injuries </li></ul><...
Traumatic Injury Worldwide <ul><li>WHO Statistics (2000)  </li></ul><ul><li>Injury mortality among men is twice that among...
Global Injury Control Initiatives <ul><li>Injury prevention programs </li></ul><ul><li>Creation of safe environments </li>...
Global Injury Control Initiatives <ul><li>Australia </li></ul><ul><ul><li>National Injury Prevention Plan: Priorities for ...
<ul><li>By participating in this PHTLS Provider program and using what you learn here in your own practice, you will be co...
The History of PHTLS <ul><li>Based on the ATLS Program (ACS) </li></ul><ul><li>Developed in response to the need for impro...
What Is PHTLS? <ul><li>Continuing education program </li></ul><ul><li>Builds on participants’ base knowledge and skills </...
What Is PHTLS?  <ul><li>Provides a “safe” skills practice environment </li></ul><ul><li>Contributes to life-long learning ...
Course Agenda–Day 1 Skill–Teaching Stations 3 hours, 20 minutes Central Nervous System 45 minutes Lunch 45 minutes Airway,...
Course Agenda–Day 2 Thermal Trauma 30 minutes Break 10 minutes Final Evaluations 3 hours Golden Principles 20 minutes Lunc...
Alternative Course Agenda–Day 1 Baselines 45 minutes Skill–Teaching Stations 3 hours 20 minutes Lunch 45 minutes Central N...
Alternative Course Agenda–Day 2 Break 10 minutes Final Evaluations 3 hours Golden Principles 20 minutes Lunch 45 minutes S...
Continued Involvement <ul><li>Other opportunities to contribute to global trauma care </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Become a PHTLS...
QUESTIONS?
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Lesson 01

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  • Instructor Notes: Injury refers to someone’s being hurt or killed, whereas accident refers to an event without apparent cause or events that are not foreseeable. The term accident implies that the incident was not preventable. A disease can be preventable.
  • Instructor Notes: Research statistics appropriate to your country. The WHO site (www.who.org) is a good place to start. Also contact local agencies in your country that maintain such statistical references. Be sure to cite your sources.
  • Instructor Notes: Global injury control initiatives typically involve: Injury prevention programs Creation of safe environments Public policy and legislation Funding Enabling public access to data Networks to sustain and promote programs Enabling and promoting research Ensuring optimal emergency response, acute care, and rehabilitation All of these initiatives can involve participation from local prehospital care providers. Encourage the course participants to become involved in their community.
  • Instructor Notes: What injury prevention initiatives are available in your area?
  • Instructor Notes: PHTLS does have a “Prevention” PowerPoint presentation available on the PHTLS website for use by any PHTLS Instructor. Transition: Next topic is the History of PHTLS
  • Instructor Notes: Although the 5 th edition text is available in several languages, it will take time post-6 th edition to translate and publish the new edition. Notice of new available editions will be posted on the website.
  • Instructor Notes: Continuing education — uses primary EMS education as a starting place; does not replace it. Emphasize the importance of teamwork between prehospital care providers and between prehospital care providers and other emergency care providers.
  • Instructor Notes: Not a protocol-based system but rather a set of principles that enable the provider to deal with dynamic environments, situations, patients… Considers that there may be more than one way to accomplish the management of the trauma patient. The ‘traditional’ way of doing things may not meet the needs of all trauma patients. The principles — philosophies of PHTLS are based upon the most current available science. Allows the provider an opportunity to review current management of trauma patients and assess how science may require changes in approach. The PHTLS course is based on the PHTLS text, but the PHTLS text goes beyond the course to provide a comprehensive trauma management resource.
  • NOTE** Not final
  • NOTE** Not final
  • NOTE** Not final
  • NOTE** Not final
  • Lesson 01

    1. 1. Prehospital Trauma Life Support Developed by the National Association of EMTs (NAEMT) In cooperation with The Committee on Trauma, American College of Surgeons (COT-ACS) NAEMT MOSBY
    2. 2. Lesson 1 <ul><li>Introduction and Overview </li></ul>
    3. 3. Objectives <ul><li>As a result of active participation in this lesson you should be able to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recognize the seriousness of traumatic injury as a disease, globally and within your own community </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Explain the history and purpose of PHTLS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Discuss the responder’s role and responsibilities in trauma management and injury prevention </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Accident vs. Disease Is perspective important? <ul><li>Injury: being hurt or killed </li></ul><ul><li>Trauma: inflicted wounds or injury </li></ul><ul><li>Accident: an event that is unforeseen or without apparent cause </li></ul><ul><li>Disease: an unhealthy condition , illness, or disorder </li></ul>
    5. 5. Traumatic Injury in the U.S. <ul><li>Leading cause of death in persons ages 1 to 44 years </li></ul><ul><li>Three times more Americans die from trauma each year than died in the entire Vietnam war </li></ul><ul><li>Only in the fifth decade of life do cancer and heart disease compare with trauma as leading causes of death </li></ul><ul><li>80% of teenage deaths and 60% of </li></ul><ul><li>childhood deaths result from trauma </li></ul>
    6. 6. Traumatic Injury Worldwide <ul><li>WHO Statistics (2000) </li></ul><ul><li>5 million people died from injuries </li></ul><ul><li>Mortality rate: 83.7/100,000 population </li></ul><ul><li>9% of world deaths </li></ul><ul><li>12% of world burden of disease </li></ul><ul><li>90% of world injury deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries </li></ul><ul><li>Road traffic injury is the leading cause of injury-related deaths </li></ul>
    7. 7. Traumatic Injury Worldwide <ul><li>WHO Statistics (2000) </li></ul><ul><li>Injury mortality among men is twice that among women </li></ul><ul><li>In some regions mortality rates for suicide and burns in females are as high or even higher than in males </li></ul><ul><li>Young people between 15 and 44 years account for almost 50% of injury-related mortality </li></ul><ul><li>Children under 5 years account for 25% </li></ul><ul><li>of drowning deaths and 15% of </li></ul><ul><li>fire-related deaths </li></ul>
    8. 8. Global Injury Control Initiatives <ul><li>Injury prevention programs </li></ul><ul><li>Creation of safe environments </li></ul><ul><li>Public policy and legislation </li></ul><ul><li>Funding </li></ul><ul><li>Enabling public access to data </li></ul><ul><li>Networks to sustain and promote programs </li></ul><ul><li>Enabling and promoting research </li></ul><ul><li>Ensuring optimal emergency response, acute care, and rehabilitation </li></ul>How is your EMS service participating?
    9. 9. Global Injury Control Initiatives <ul><li>Australia </li></ul><ul><ul><li>National Injury Prevention Plan: Priorities for 2001-2003 and the Implementation Plan </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Canada </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A Safer Canada (year 2000): Injury Control Objectives for Canada </li></ul></ul><ul><li>United Kingdom </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Preventing Accidental Injury: Priorities for Action </li></ul></ul><ul><li>United States </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Healthy People 2010 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>DOD: Injury/Occupational Illness, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prevention, Practices, and Initiatives </li></ul></ul><ul><li>World Health Organization </li></ul>
    10. 10. <ul><li>By participating in this PHTLS Provider program and using what you learn here in your own practice, you will be contributing to the success of global injury control initiative programs by decreasing death rates and minimizing disability. </li></ul>Global Injury Control Initiatives
    11. 11. The History of PHTLS <ul><li>Based on the ATLS Program (ACS) </li></ul><ul><li>Developed in response to the need for improved prehospital trauma care </li></ul><ul><li>Pilot courses held in 1983 </li></ul><ul><li>Now offered in 33 countries </li></ul><ul><li>The fifth edition text is published in several languages </li></ul>
    12. 12. What Is PHTLS? <ul><li>Continuing education program </li></ul><ul><li>Builds on participants’ base knowledge and skills </li></ul><ul><li>Focuses on critical thinking and problem solving skills </li></ul><ul><li>Promotes teamwork </li></ul>
    13. 13. What Is PHTLS? <ul><li>Provides a “safe” skills practice environment </li></ul><ul><li>Contributes to life-long learning and professional development </li></ul><ul><li>Provides foundations of understanding </li></ul><ul><li>Uses principles, not protocols </li></ul><ul><li>Based on science (research) </li></ul>
    14. 14. Course Agenda–Day 1 Skill–Teaching Stations 3 hours, 20 minutes Central Nervous System 45 minutes Lunch 45 minutes Airway, Oxygenation, and Ventilation 50 minutes Principles of Assessment and Management 45 minutes Kinematics 60 minutes Break 10 minutes Lessons Learned 20 minutes Baselines 45 minutes Course Introduction and Overview 15 minutes
    15. 15. Course Agenda–Day 2 Thermal Trauma 30 minutes Break 10 minutes Final Evaluations 3 hours Golden Principles 20 minutes Lunch 45 minutes Skill–Teaching Stations 90 minutes Special Considerations: Elderly, Pediatric, and Pregnant Patients 45 minutes Thoracic Trauma 45 minutes Shock: A Multisystem Approach 55 minutes
    16. 16. Alternative Course Agenda–Day 1 Baselines 45 minutes Skill–Teaching Stations 3 hours 20 minutes Lunch 45 minutes Central Nervous Systems 45 minutes Airway, Oxygenation, and Ventilation 50 minutes Principles of Assessment and Management 45 minutes Break 10 minutes Kinematics 60 minutes Lessons Learned 20 minutes Course Introduction and Overview 15 minutes
    17. 17. Alternative Course Agenda–Day 2 Break 10 minutes Final Evaluations 3 hours Golden Principles 20 minutes Lunch 45 minutes Skill-Teaching Stations 90 minutes Special Considerations: Elderly, Pediatric and Pregnant Patients 45 minutes Thermal Trauma 30 minutes Thoracic Trauma 45 minutes Shock: A Multisystems Approach 55 minutes
    18. 18. Continued Involvement <ul><li>Other opportunities to contribute to global trauma care </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Become a PHTLS Instructor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Prevention </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Embrace it within your own life — modeling </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Actively teach it within your community </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Engage in research </li></ul></ul>
    19. 19. QUESTIONS?

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