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e-Books in academia: Surveying the current landscape

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Part of the June 5th day long workshop at MCLS on "ebooks and Libraries"

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e-Books in academia: Surveying the current landscape

  1. 1. e-Books in academia:Surveying the current landscapeFrank CervonePrincipal, Cervone and Associates, LLCMidwest Collaborative for Library ServiceseBooks & Libraries Series - The Digital Library: Now and FutureJune 5, 2013
  2. 2. Some people perceivee-Books in academiclibraries as the workof a malevolent forceImage courtesy of morethings.com
  3. 3. Larson, R. R. (1991). The decline of subject searching: Long-term trends and patterns of index use in an online catalog. Journal of the AmericanSociety for Information Science, 42, pp. 197–215. Online at doi:10.1002/(SICI)1097-4571(199104)42:3<197::AID-ASI6>3.0.CO;2-TImage courtesy of Chance AgrellaTraditional libraryusage may be inferredby the amount ofsearching in catalogs
  4. 4. De Groote, S.L., Hitchcock, K., and McGowan, R. (2007). Trends in reference usage statistics in an academic health science library. Journal of theMedical Library Association, 95(1), pp. 23–30. Online at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1773032/What is required oflibraries is morecomplex today
  5. 5. It is obvious thatlibraries need toreinvent themselves ifthey are to surviveCastillo, M. (2010). Are Libraries an Endangered Species? American Journal of Neuroradiology, 31, pp. 1161-1162. Online atwww.ajnr.org/content/31/7/1161.long
  6. 6. Ninety-four percentof academic librariesoffer e-Books33% of school libraries72% of public librariesDilworth, D. (2011). Ninety-four percent of academic libraries offer e-books. Appnewser, February 10, 2011. Online atwww.mediabistro.com/appnewser/ninety-four-percent-of-academic-libraries-offer-ebooks_b5878
  7. 7. Data-Planet by Conquest Systems, Inc. (2013). National Center for Education Statistics. Academic Library Statistics: United States: E-Books-Held at End of FY | Country: USA – [Data-file]. Dataset-ID: 017-015-032. Online at www.data-planet.com.E-Book growth2002 to 2010
  8. 8. Map of e-Bookholdings in academiclibraries by stateData-Planet by Conquest Systems, Inc. (2013). National Center for Education Statistics. Academic Library Statistics: United States: E-Books-Held at End of FY | Country: USA – [Data-file], Dataset-ID: 017-015-032. Online at doi:10.6068/DP13EF6DC808458
  9. 9. Number of e-Books inacademic institutionsby stateData-Planet by Conquest Systems, Inc. (2013). National Center for Education Statistics. Academic Library Statistics: United States: E-Books-Held at End of FY | Country: USA – [Data-file], Dataset-ID: 017-015-032. Online at doi:10.6068/DP13EF6D3A1EA55
  10. 10. Top 20 adoptinginstitutionsData-Planet by Conquest Systems, Inc. (2013). National Center for Education Statistics. Academic Library Statistics: United States: E-Books-Held at End of FY | Country: USA – [Data-file], Dataset-ID: 017-015-032. Online at doi:10.6068/DP13EF6D9C3AA57
  11. 11. Only 12 percent ofacademic librariescirculate preloadede-reading devicesPolanka, S. (2011). Library Journal Published Library eBook Survey Results. No Shelf Required blog, February 9, 2011. Online athttp://www.libraries.wright.edu/noshelfrequired/2011/02/09/library-journal-publishes-library-ebook-survey-results-sample-data-here/Image courtesy of pandodaily
  12. 12. This shouldn’t be toosurprising…• Dedicated e-readerhas not reached apoint where thetechnology is worthinvesting in• Technology doesnot match delivery• Focus on standardcomputers, PDAs, and other mobiledevicesKiriakova, M., Okamoto, K. S., Zubarev, M., and Gross, G. (2010). Aiming at a Moving Target: Pilot Testing Ebook Readers in an UrbanAcademic Library. Computers in Libraries, 30(2), 20-24.
  13. 13. Worrying aboutdedicated e-Readersprobably doesn’tmatter anywayCoursey, D. (2012). How Dead Is Amazons Kindle? Could Be Very Dead. Forbes, April 30, 2012. Online athttp://www.forbes.com/sites/davidcoursey/2012/04/30/how-dead-is-amazons-mobile-could-be-very-dead/Kaufman, L. (2013). Barnes & Noble Weighs Its E-Reader Investment, New York Times, February 24, 2013. Online athttp://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/25/business/media/barnes-noble-weighs-its-nook-losses.html?_r=0Image coutresy of wallpaperswide.com
  14. 14. Stereotypes ofacademic e-BookcollectionsComputer scienceBusinessReferenceSnowhill, L. (2001). E-books and Their Future in Academic Libraries. D-Lib Magazine 7(7/8). Online athttp://www.dlib.org/dlib/july01/snowhill/07snowhill.html
  15. 15. Disciplines wherelibraries are mostlikely to offer e-BooksPolanka, S. (2011). Library Journal Published Library eBook Survey Results. No Shelf Required blog, February 9, 2011. Online athttp://www.libraries.wright.edu/noshelfrequired/2011/02/09/library-journal-publishes-library-ebook-survey-results-sample-data-here/83 82 80 7769510102030405060708090
  16. 16. It is difficult to comparethe usage of e-Bookvolumes with printedtitlesCox, J. (2004) E-Books: Challenges and Opportunities. D-Lib Magazine, 10(10). Online at http://www.dlib.org/dlib/october04/cox/10cox.htmlCourtesy cheekymonokeymedia.com
  17. 17. e-Books are usedalmost exclusively toscan for informationD’Agostino, D. (2010). The strange case of academic libraries and e-books nobody reads. Teleread, January 7, 2010. Online athttp://www.teleread.com/ebooks/the-strange-case-of-academic-libraries-and-e-books-nobody-reads/Arctic Ground Squirrel image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons: Alan Vernon
  18. 18. Evidence stronglysuggests that e-Booksare used primarily usedfor quick fact extraction“Academic” e-Books, that isJISC CIBER Team. (2009). JISC national e-books observatory project: Key findings and recommendations.http://issuu.com/carenmilloy/docs/jisc_national_e-books_observatory_final_report
  19. 19. Academic e-Books arenot preferred for longform reading (today)The nature of some coursesforces students into using e-Books as they are unable toeasily visit the physical librarye-Books are not yet regardedas the main point ofinformation, but are insteadseen as an accompaniment toexisting resources and areoften only used when printcopies are unavailableBrown, L. (2010). Ebooks and the academic library: their usage and effect. Dissertation at AberystwythUniversity, http://hdl.handle.net/2160/5954Image courtesy of The Edmontonian, Brittney Le Blanc
  20. 20. What don’t academiclibrarians like aboute-Books?• Variation in andcomplexity ofbusiness models forpurchasing• Licensing varietyand digital rightsmanagement(DRM) restrictions• Perceived highpricesVasileiou, M., Hartley, R., and Rowley, J. (2012). Choosing e-books: a perspective from academic libraries, Online InformationReview, 36(1), pp.21 - 39
  21. 21. Pricing and businessmodels can beconfusing (and odd)From an anonymous vendor’s sales presentationModel Access Level Access PeriodPurchase 1U, 3U, UU OngoingSubscription UU 1 yearShort-term lease 1U 1/7/14/28 days
  22. 22. Large portions ofe-Book collections arenot usedBut then, up to 90% of thetraditional referencecollection may not be usedeitherChrzastwoski, T. E. (2013). Assessing the Value of Ebooks to Academic Libraries and Users. Proceedings of the 9th Northumbria InternationalConference on Performance Measurement in Libraries and Information Services, 2011, pp. 53-61. Online athttp://www.libqual.org/documents/LibQual/publications/2013/9th_Northumbria_Conference_Proceedings.pdfBradford, J. T. Whats Coming Off the Shelves? A Reference Use Study Analyzing Print Reference Sources Used in a University Library, The Journal ofAcademic Librarianship, 31(6), pp. 546-558. Online at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0099133305001163010000200003000040000500006000070000UnusedUsed
  23. 23. However, cost per usecan be quite lowIn the UIUCstudy, varied between$0.68 and $1.48Chrzastwoski, T. E. (2013). Assessing the Value of Ebooks to Academic Libraries and Users. Proceedings of the 9th Northumbria InternationalConference on Performance Measurement in Libraries and Information Services, 2011, pp. 53-61. Online athttp://www.libqual.org/documents/LibQual/publications/2013/9th_Northumbria_Conference_Proceedings.pdf
  24. 24. Revocable RightsFor example, this Simon &Schuster license:Simon and Schuster grants you alimited, personal, non-exclusive, revocable, non-assignable, and non-transferablelicense to view, use, and/or playa single copy of the Materialsand download one copy of theMaterials on any single computerfor your personal, non-commercial, home use onlywww.simonandschuster.com/about/terms_of_useHamaker, C. (2011). Ebooks on Fire: Controversies Surrounding Ebooks in Libraries, Searcher, 19(10). Online athttp://www.infotoday.com/searcher/dec11/Hamaker.shtml
  25. 25. Revisions, whetheryou like it or notFrom the Random Houselicense with library resellers:RH reserves the right, at anytime … to replace, edit ormodify the contents of any RHeBook.www.randomhouse.biz/booksellers/pdfs/eBooksLibraryTOS1210.pdfHamaker, C. (2011). Ebooks on Fire: Controversies Surrounding Ebooks in Libraries, Searcher, 19(10). Online athttp://www.infotoday.com/searcher/dec11/Hamaker.shtml
  26. 26. ConfidentialityHamaker, C. (2011). Ebooks on Fire: Controversies Surrounding Ebooks in Libraries, Searcher, 19(10). Online athttp://www.infotoday.com/searcher/dec11/Hamaker.shtml
  27. 27. ArchivingImage courtesy of maverick2003 on flickr
  28. 28. Yet, we continue to godown the journalpathwayPerpetual licenses - 74%Subscription licenses - 71%Polanka, S. (2011). Library Journal Published Library eBook Survey Results. No Shelf Required blog. Online athttp://www.libraries.wright.edu/noshelfrequired/2011/02/09/library-journal-publishes-library-ebook-survey-results-sample-data-here/
  29. 29. But if libraries don’tcare, why should thepublishers?Polanka, S. (2011). Library Journal Published Library eBook Survey Results. No Shelf Required blog. Online athttp://www.libraries.wright.edu/noshelfrequired/2011/02/09/library-journal-publishes-library-ebook-survey-results-sample-data-here/Courtesy orgmonkey at stripgenerator. Online athttp://s3.amazonaws.com/stripgenerator/strip/90/68/14/00/00/full.png
  30. 30. A major trend is theadoption of theplatform and not thepurchasing decisions ofcolleges and universitiesDewan, P. (2012). Are books becoming extinct in academic libraries? New Library World, 113(1/2), pp. 27-37.
  31. 31. With the ubiquity ofmobile devices, e-Booksare expected to replaceprint volumesDewan, P. (2012). Are books becoming extinct in academic libraries? New Library World, 113(1/2), pp. 27-37.Image from Steve Rhodes used under a Creative Commons license.
  32. 32. Acceptance of e-Bookshas reached a levelwhere they havebecome an importantlibrary serviceShelbourne, W. A. (2009). E-book usage in an academic library: User attitudes and behaviors. Library Collections, Acquisitions, and TechnicalServices, 33(2–3), pp. 59–72.
  33. 33. There is a need forlibraries to raiseawareness about thee-Books they offer andhow they offer themAshcroft, L. (2011). Ebooks in libraries: an overview of the current situation. Library Management, 32(6-7), pp. 398-407.
  34. 34. Q&AFrank CervonePrincipal, Cervone and Associates, LLCfcervone@cervone.com

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