Pandemic & emergency preparedness

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“The only possible benefit of NOT planning is that disasters will come as a complete surprise and will, therefore, not be preceded by long periods of paranoia and depression!”

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Pandemic & emergency preparedness

  1. 1. PANDEMIC & EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FOR FIRST NATIONS COMMUNITIESChris Hylton, CG Hylton & Associates Inc.Chris@hylton.caToll Free Tel. 800 449-5866 or Tel 403 264-5288 1 INFONEX: 11:30-12:30 Weds Feb 9 2011 Ottawa
  2. 2. • People assume that in any disaster, government agencies will step in to save them: Hurricane Katrina Report2
  3. 3. If you fail to3 plan……. You have planned to fail!
  4. 4. 4 “The only possible benefit of NOT planning is that disasters will come as a complete surprise and will, therefore, not be preceded by long periods of paranoia and depression!”
  5. 5. Global Trends in Major Disasters Source: Environment Canada5 Source: 2009 SUMA CONVENTION
  6. 6. Why Prepare?6  Tornadoes Power outage  Severe Snow Computer system failure Storms Flood: External and internal  Blackouts  Floods Fuel Leak  Chemical Spills Bomb incident  Fire Civil disorder  Explosion Workplace Violence Incident  Water outage Barricade / hostage incident
  7. 7. Duty to Act - Planning7  Governments & Corporations in Canada have “Due Diligence” obligations to plan for the protection/support of their populations, clients, and personnel:  Moral  Ethical  Financial  Legislated
  8. 8. Disaster Planning8  What is it?  Why do it?  What is the end product?
  9. 9. Your employees:9 1. How many employees will show up? Remember they have their own families to take care of and their own issues 2. Where do they live? 3. Are they affected directly by the event? 4. Do you have a plan to evacuate responding employees should the situation worsen? 5. Do you have a plan to compensate those who do respond?
  10. 10. Essential Services10  Can you maintain them and how? Gas Electricity Water Communications (Remember you are dependant upon others to provide certain services)
  11. 11. Expect:11  Emergency Services will be busy and/or possibly overwhelmed, and you may not see them for some time  More then one Emergency Situation may be present  Panic and chaos  Criminals attempting to take advantage of the situation
  12. 12. Where to Start?12  Form a committee  Find previous plans, if available  Know legal and other requirements  Perform risk assessment  Collect information  Develop procedures  Write the plan  Distribute plan  Train staff  Continue to modify plan
  13. 13. Form a Committee13  Establish authority  Leadership buy-in  Make the committee membership representative of the entire organization  Appoint one person to head the committee  Give each committee member specific assignments  Ensure all committee members understand their purpose and responsibilities
  14. 14. Find Previous Plans, if any14  Save time by starting with previous plans  Review previous plans for accuracy  Use plans to determine what needs work  Keep plans (especially electronic versions) for use when writing the updated plan  If there is no previous plan, look at a plan from another agency or institution
  15. 15. Collect Information15  Important phone numbers  Emergency (fire, police, etc.)  Staff (work, home, cell)  Internal resources (building information, supplies)  External resources (insurance, recovery services)  Information systems  Analysis from risk assessment  Salvage priorities (vital records list)  Past disaster plans or examples of disaster plans
  16. 16. Develop Procedures16  Evacuation procedures (with maps)  Emergency procedures  Disaster procedures  Recovery procedures  Other incident procedures  Shut down procedures / security check lists  Who will talk to media, families, children
  17. 17. Write the Plan17  A disaster plan is actually a set of plans  List of key personnel (with contact information)  Building information (emergency systems, etc.)  Emergency services (with contact information)  Salvage priorities (vital records)  Procedures (evacuation, emergency, disaster, recovery, other incidents, shut down/security check)  Information systems (with backup information)  List of supplies
  18. 18. Use centralized control by one person for the plan18  Role of Manager  Planners  Coordinators  Know who to call  Training
  19. 19. Train Staff19  A disaster plan will not function without a trained staff to follow the plan  Training could include:  Reading the plan  Lecture / Discussion  Demonstration / Simulation  Training could cover:  Use of fire extinguishers  Evacuation routes  Other specific procedures
  20. 20. Telephone fan out20  One calls five  Each of five calls five  Message gets out immediately  What system do you have in place?
  21. 21. Have emergency maps handy21  At home at work  Details of escape route  Practise escape  Have alternative escape route  Practise alternative  Have resource materials on hand for others, books on death for kids
  22. 22. Who will talk to media22
  23. 23. Lockdown24  Dangerous person in your midst  Practise lockdown in the facility  Locking doors  Secure area  Safety of children, clients
  24. 24. 25 Used with permission of Bob Thaves
  25. 25. H1N1, Bird Flu, SARSPandemic Emergencies
  26. 26. PANDEMIC PREPAREDNESS27 AND RESPONSE First, to minimize serious illness and overall deaths and second, to minimize societal disruption among Canadians as a result of an influenza pandemic.
  27. 27. Potential Source of Pandemic Influenza Virus28 Human Non-human Virus Virus Reassorted Type “A” may undergo major Viruses are PROLIFIC and virus changes in “H” and/or “N” from very PROMISCUOUS little genetic re-assortment which has beggars! potential for pandemic influenza.
  28. 28. Timeline of Emergence of Influenza A Viruses in Humans29 Avian Influenza H9 H7 H5 H5 H1 H3 H2 H1 1918 1957 1968 1977 1997 2003 1998/9
  29. 29. Pandemics occur 3-4 times each century!30 Unpredictable! A constantly mutating virus! If the H1N1 virus doesn’t cause a pandemic, another one will!
  30. 30. History31 10 Pandemics in Last 300 years 1918-1919: Spanish Flu (H1N1)  Attack Rate 25% (High mortality in the young)  40 million deaths in less than 1 year 1957-1958: Asian Flu (H2N2)  Attack Rate 25% - 30%  1 million deaths (High elder mortality) 1968-1969: Hong Kong Flu (H3N2)  Attack Rate 20% - 25% (High elder and higher adult mortality)  1 million deaths  Swine Flu deaths - 26 per 100,000
  31. 31. 32
  32. 32. It won’t hurt a bit33
  33. 33. Diverse location of Aboriginal Communities Federal MOH needs jurisdiction and legal powers to access information in order to conduct efficient surveillance (vigilance) and To implement efficient control measures (intervention)34
  34. 34. 35
  35. 35. Possibility of « designated authority » from provincial Public Health Acts to federal Regional Medical Officers (RMOs) in the Provinces36 Source : Jean-François Savard, Office of Community Medicine, 2007
  36. 36. Basic Hygiene37  Hand washing  Sneezing  Sanitizer  Hand shaking  School open  School closed
  37. 37. Mental Health “EVEN HEROES NEED TO TALK.” Role of Employee Assistance Plan (EAP) One of the marketing slogans for Project Liberty, New York’s post-9/11 Crisis Counseling Program
  38. 38. Physical Reactions39  Fatigue, exhaustion  Gastrointestinal distress  Appetite change  Tightening in throat, chest, or stomach  Worsening of existing medical conditions  Somatic complaints
  39. 39. Emotional Reactions40  Depression, sadness  Irritability, anger, resentment  Anxiety, fear  Despair, hopelessness  Guilt, self-doubt  Unpredictable mood swings  Feeling overwhelmed  Apathy
  40. 40. Cognitive Reactions41  Confusion, disorientation  Recurring dreams or nightmares  Preoccupation with disaster  Trouble concentrating or remembering things  Difficulty making decisions  Questioning spiritual beliefs
  41. 41. Behavioral Reactions42  Sleep problems  Crying easily  Avoiding reminders  Excessive activity level  Increased conflicts with family  Hyper-vigilance, startle reactions  Isolation or social withdrawal  Changes in appetite
  42. 42. Chronic Stressors43  Family disruption  Work overload  Gender differences  Bureaucratic hassles  Financial constraints
  43. 43. Encourage Responders to:44  Drink plenty of water and eat healthy snacks  Take frequent, brief breaks from the scene as practicable especially if they are coming home to work in a first responder capacity  Talk about their emotions to process what they have seen and done  Stay in touch with family and friends  Participate in memorials, rituals, and use of symbols as a way to express feelings  Pair up with another responder to monitor one another’s stress
  44. 44. Strategies in Response45  Self-care  Peer Support  Humor  Decide to talk  Seek help from credible and trusted sources  Get extra rest  Use constructive coping strategies
  45. 45. Strategies in Recovery46  Long term assessment for risk  Journaling  Practice “relapse prevention”  Lifestyle and health promotion  Role models/partnering/mentoring
  46. 46. Our offer to you47  Please call if you have any HR, or workplace issue that you are overwhelmed with  We can help you  We also are pleased to do Free Workshops for your organization (some limits apply) Let us know what your needs are and we will make it happen!
  47. 47. CG Hylton - Services HR Consulting  Benefits, Pensions, Job Descriptions EAP  Strategic Planning Salary Grids  Drug and Alcohol Wellness at Work programs Staff Morale  Dept re-orgs Training and Workshops  Leadership compensation Tel 403 264 5288 chris@hylton.ca 48
  48. 48. Do you have any:49  Comments?  Questions?  Feedback? Chris Hylton 800 449 5866 chris@hylton.ca

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