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North korea ppt

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NORTH KOREA

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North korea ppt

  1. 1. NORTH KOREA Subject: Politics Lecturer: Gary Giss
  2. 2. Group’s members • Đặng Kim Hiếu - 1258020 • Trần Quang Khôi - 1258027 • Đào Ngọc Lan Đài - 1258007 • Nguyễn Trọng Tấn- 1258068 • Nguyễn Thị Trà My- 1258034
  3. 3. Outline • Introduction • Politics • Economy • Society • Conclusion
  4. 4. INTRODUCTION
  5. 5. NORTH KOREA
  6. 6. • Relative Location: Eastern Asia on the coast of the Sea of Japan, it is located on a peninsula. • Absolute Location: 39.2 N 125.45 E Location
  7. 7. North Korea Physical Features/map
  8. 8. Background • Japan invaded North Korea in 1905 • Korea split into North & South Korea in 1945 • On June 25th 1950, North Korea sent 75,000 soldiers across the 38th Parallel attacking the South.
  9. 9. Timeline 1944 1948 1960's19531950 Japanese occupation of Korea ends Soviet troops withdraw South declares independence , sparking North Korean invasion Armistice ends Korean War, Rapid industrial growth.
  10. 10. 1980 1991 200320011994 Kim Jong-il, moved up party and political ladder. North and South Korea join the United Nations Death of Kim Il-sung. Kim Jong-il succeeds him as leader North Korea agrees to freeze nuclear program Worst drought in history North Korea withdraws from the Nuclear Non- Proliferation Treaty (NPT)
  11. 11. North Korean Leaders • North Korea is a communist state led by a Dictator. That Dictator is now Kim Jong-un
  12. 12. Human Environment Interaction • North Korea's agricultural economy is 35% while its industry and services are 65% of its economy
  13. 13. Floods and Food shortages
  14. 14. Religion • Buddhist, Hindu or a Confucius
  15. 15. Movement • The government has total control and they decide where people are, and how everything works and flows.
  16. 16. The government provide the illusion of religion.
  17. 17. • Closed economy
  18. 18. Continuity Through Change Of North Korea • In 1994 : The ‘Arduous March’ • Kim Jong il died in December 2011 • Economy was in meltdown • Kim Jong Un has become the head of a new collective leadership that appears firmly in control
  19. 19. Biography Kim Jong-il • Kim Jong-il was the powerful leader of North Korea from 1994 to 2011 • By that time North Korea had become one of the most isolated countries in the world, with frequent famines and an economy in a shambles • Kim's attempts to acquire nuclear weapons for North Korea • He reportedly suffered a stroke in 2008, and died three years later
  20. 20. POLITICS
  21. 21. NORTH KOREA POLITICAL
  22. 22. Political parties • Democratic Republic • Single party : Workers' Party of Korea.
  23. 23. Political ideology • Juche (state ideology). • Songun ("military-first" policy).
  24. 24. Juche (Chosŏn'gŭl: 주체; hancha: 主體;)
  25. 25. • Described by the regime as Kim Il-Sung's "original, brilliant and revolutionary contribution to national and international thought“ .
  26. 26. Songun (or, alternatively, Seon'gun)
  27. 27. • Songun became major ideology after Kim Il- sung's death. • Their army was called Korean People’s Army.
  28. 28. Military
  29. 29. • The KPA has 1,106,000 active and 8,389,000 reserve and paramilitary troops, making it the largest military institution in the world. • Approximately one in every 25 citizens is an enlisted soldier.
  30. 30. Weapon • North Korea had been suspected of maintaining a clandestine nuclear weapons development program since the early 1980s when it constructed a plutonium-producing Magnox nuclear reactor at Yongbyon.
  31. 31. • North Korea's ability to deliver weapons of mass destruction to a hypothetical target is somewhat limited by its missile technology. • KN-1 • KN-2 • Hwasong-5 • Hwasong-6 • Nodong-1 • Taepodong
  32. 32. ECONOMY
  33. 33. North Korea’s Economic Phases • Industrialization • The Soviet model (self-reliance)1960s • Foreign loans and indulged in large-scale imports of machinery and plant facilities • The oil shock   the petroleum prices 1970s • Malfunctioning in its centralized planned system in the form of supply shortages, systemic inefficiency, and infrastructural decay • Refusing to open up the economy 1980s • Collapsed (The disintegration of the Soviet Union, food crisis, natural disasters: hails in 1994, flooding in 1995-1996, and droughts in 1997) pushed North Korea into a crisis • Dependent on international aid 1990s
  34. 34. Foreign Loans & Grants (US$ Million) Former Soviet Union China Other Socialist States OECD Members Subtotal Before 1948 53.0 - - - 53.0 1953-60 609.0 459.6 364.9 - 1,883.5 (Grants) (325.0) (287.1) (364.9) - (977.0) 1961-70 558.3 157.4 159.0 9 883.7 1971-80 682.1 300.0 - 1,292.2 2,274.1 1981-90 508.4 500.0 - - 1,008.4 Total 2,409.8 1,417.0 523.9 1,301.0 6,102.7 Source: North Korea’s External Debts: Trend and Characteristics, Korea Focus (KDI Review of the North Korea Economy, March 2012, published by the Korea Development Institute)
  35. 35. North Korea’s Economic Phases • Industrialization • The Soviet model (self-reliance)1960s • Foreign loans and indulged in large-scale imports of machinery and plant facilities • The oil shock   the petroleum prices 1970s • Malfunctioning in its centralized planned system in the form of supply shortages, systemic inefficiency, and infrastructural decay • Refusing to open up the economy 1980s • collapsed (The disintegration of the Soviet Union, food crisis, natural disasters: hails in 1994, flooding in 1995-1996, and droughts in 1997) pushed North Korea into a crisis • Dependent on international aid 1990s
  36. 36. Amount of Shortage (Unit: 10,000 ton) 1995 121 1996 184 1997 161 1998 146 1999 115 2000 96 2001 165 2002 141 2003 129 2004 114 2005 106 2006 106 2007 95 2008 139 2009 117 2010 135 2011 109
  37. 37. • Rolled out 14 new Special Economic Zones2013 • The economic growth picked for few years before dipping again.2000s • Malfunctioning in its centralized planned system in the form of supply shortages, systemic inefficiency, and infrastructural decay • Refusing to open up the economy 1980s • collapsed (The disintegration of the Soviet Union, food crisis, natural disasters: hails in 1994, flooding in 1995-1996, and droughts in 1997) pushed North Korea into a crisis • Dependent on international aid 1990s
  38. 38. The “military” ambition • 1966: the defense sector comprised around 10% total expenditures • 1967 to 1971: over 30 % • 1970s: 30% - 50%
  39. 39. • GDP: $33.3 billion (2013) (rise of 1.1%) • agriculture: 23.4% • industry: 47.2% • services: 29.4% • The main industries: • military products • machine building • electric power, chemicals • mining (coal, iron ore, limestone, graphite, copper, zinc, lead, and precious metals), metallurgy • textiles, food processing • tourism
  40. 40. • China and South Korea are North’s main trading partners. • CIA’s 2012 estimates from the Factbook reveal: • 63% of the exports from North are directed to China • 27% to South Korea • 73% percent of the total imports comes from China (concessional assistance and support) • 19% from South Korea
  41. 41. SOCIETY
  42. 42. Demography • Ethnically homogeneous • Population growth rate
  43. 43. Healthcare • Public health • Free universal insurance system • Preventive medicine emphasization Pyongyang Maternity Hospital
  44. 44. Infrastructure • Rail transport is by far the most widespread • Road transport is very limited • Obsolete and in disrepair • Develop own civilian nuclear program A Soviet-built M62 diesel unit at Pyongyang Station
  45. 45. EDUCATION
  46. 46. EDUCATION
  47. 47. RELIGION
  48. 48. RELIGION
  49. 49. HUMAN RIGHTS
  50. 50. HUMAN RIGHTS
  51. 51. CONCLUSION
  52. 52. THANK YOU FOR LISTENING

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