Easy Sourcing in Australia and New Zealand

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Easy Sourcing in Australia and New Zealand

  1. 1. By Irina Shamaeva, Chief Sourcer, Brain Gain Recruiting Founder, People Sourcing Certification Program http://sourcingcertification.com http://www.linkedin.com/in/irinashamaeva http://twitter.com/braingain Blog http://booleanstrings.com 1
  2. 2. Today’s topic is: Searching with easy, readable syntax 2
  3. 3. Lots can be found simply searching for English words and phrases: • “Passive”candidates • Potential clients 3
  4. 4. Google is “the” search engine • It has indexed the largest number of Internet pages 4
  5. 5. Settings • No instant results • 100 results/page • No personal results 5
  6. 6. Example 1.
  7. 7. Example 2.
  8. 8. Example 3.
  9. 9. The Core Principle of Searching How-To Tips for Types of Pages Brief Notes on Syntax How-To Tips for Types of Info Fun Stuff: Image Search Setting the Right Expectations Q&A 9
  10. 10. “What are we going to find?” Suppose we have landed on an interesting, relevant page as the result of a search… • What will the words and phrases be like there? 10
  11. 11. Search for some of the words and phrases you expect to see on the relevant results page 11
  12. 12. Social Profiles (LinkedIn) Associations 12
  13. 13. Expect to find • The word LinkedIn • Geography words • Job title(s) • Certification(s) • Keywords 13
  14. 14. 14
  15. 15. Expect to find: • Association • Location words • Industry keywords • A pointer to a member directory or member search 15
  16. 16. 16
  17. 17. 17
  18. 18. AND Quotation Marks OR • Best practices for using OR Parentheses Excluding terms • Best practices for excluding 18
  19. 19. There’s no operator AND • Do not use it! Google tries to find pages that have all the words you have listed 19
  20. 20. To try and find the exact word, or words together (a “phrase”), use the quotation marks: • "manager" • "she" • "registered nurse" • "please contact me at" 20
  21. 21. Caution: watch for MS Office-changed quotes. Google understands straight "", not curly “”
  22. 22. OR is a Boolean operator. It helps to use it in cases you’d really need one or more of the words to be found in the results Syntax: Deloitte OR Accenture OR Gartner 22
  23. 23. You can avoid using OR simply by searching for the words in turn: 1. Search for Deloitte 2. Search for Accenture 3. Search for Gartner 23
  24. 24. Google completely ignores parentheses. Period. 24
  25. 25. If you want to exclude a word from the search results, you can use the minus in front of a word (no spaces in-between) For best practices, consider using it less rather than more, and never upfront 25
  26. 26. How to express in key words and phrases: • Terminology • Contact Information  Email Addresses  Phone Numbers • Geography • Degrees 26
  27. 27. What are we going to find? Imagine words that a person’s profile page (or a site) would use, not what the job description necessarily says To come up with keywords, explore some examples of “ideal” profiles 27
  28. 28. Get quick help in figuring out terminology 28
  29. 29. What are we going to find? • Generic (free) email addresses • Phrases • Company emails Including these in a search may help to find profiles with contact info, as well as lists 29
  30. 30. Example • "gmail.com" OR "yahoo.com" OR "aol.com" No need to use long lists 30
  31. 31. “Email me at” “Email me on” “My email is” “Contact me at” 31
  32. 32.  linkedin Melbourne Australia sales "email me at" "people you know" 32
  33. 33. What are we going to find? • Area codes • Phrases 33
  34. 34. 02 Central east region (New South Wales, Australian Capital Territory) 03 South east region (Victoria,Tasmania) 04 Mobile telephones (Australia-wide) 07 North east region (Queensland) 08 Central and west region (Western Australia, South Australia and Northern Territory) 34
  35. 35. 35
  36. 36. “call me at” “call me on” “my phone is” “my mobile phone number is” 36
  37. 37. Country calling codes and area codes • http://countrycode.org • http://www.countrycallingcodes.com 37
  38. 38. What are we going to find? Use the location names the way the pages may use them 38
  39. 39. Postal codes http://www.geonames.org/postal-codes/ • Note: these numbers have a better chance to be useful if they are longer and are combined with other “local” keywords 39
  40. 40. Drop the terms with too many synonyms: • You will always review the results 40
  41. 41. Drag an image to Google’s image search to look for it across the web
  42. 42. LOTs can be found by using English words and phrases without complex Boolean operators By searching using English (vs. Boolean) you are giving up some control over search results and may miss some results • But you may gain productivity spending time on processing the results and reaching out to the people you find 43
  43. 43. After you have mastered searching in “plain English” you may feel more comfortable learning to use some advanced search operators, to gain better control of search results 44
  44. 44. We can only find web pages if they are out there Some info is behind a log into a site with a password Some info is wrong or obsolete
  45. 45. Blog http://booleanstrings.com Largest Sourcers’ Online Community • "Boolean Strings" Group on LinkedIn • Boolean Strings Network People Sourcing Certifications • http://sourcingcertification.com
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