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Linux File System

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Linux File System

  1. 1. Linux File System © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> All Rights Reserved.
  2. 2. What to Expect? W's of a File System Three Levels of File System © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 2 All Rights Reserved.
  3. 3. What is a File System? Mechanism of Organizing our Data Labelling by Names, Easy Access, ... Algorithm to Achieve the Desired Organization Ability to Store, Retrieve, Search, Sort, ... Data Structures to Achieve the Desired Performance © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 3 All Rights Reserved.
  4. 4. Why we need a File System? Preserve Data for Later Access Update Discard Tag Data for Categorizing Easy & Fast Lookup Fast & Reliable Data Management by Optimized Operations © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 4 All Rights Reserved.
  5. 5. File System Decoded Three things at three levels Hardware Space – The Physical Organization of Data on the Storage Devices Kernel Space – Drivers to decode & access the data from the Physical Organization User Space – All what you see from / - The User View Which ever it be, it basically does Organize our data For easy access by tagging For fast maintenance by optimizing © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 5 All Rights Reserved.
  6. 6. Hardware Space File System © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 6 All Rights Reserved.
  7. 7. The Hard Disk Tracks Sectors Disk or Platter © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 7 All Rights Reserved.
  8. 8. The Hard Disk Spindle Heads . . Cylinder . . . . © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 8 All Rights Reserved.
  9. 9. Understanding a Hard Disk Example (Hard Disk) Heads (or Platters): 0 – 9 Tracks (or Cylinders): 0 – 24 Sectors: 1 – 64 Size of the Hard Disk 10 x 25 x 64 x 512 bytes = 8000KiB Device independent numbering (h, t, s) → 64 * (10 * t + h) + s → (1 - 16000) © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 9 All Rights Reserved.
  10. 10. Partitioning a Hard Disk First Sector – Master Boot Record (MBR) Contains Boot Info Contains Physical Partition Table Maximum Physical Partitions: 4 At max 1 as Extended Partition Rest as Primary Partition Extended could be further partitioned into Logical Partitions In each partition First Sector – Boot Record (BR) Remaining for File System / Format Extended Partition BR contains the Logical Partition Table © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 10 All Rights Reserved.
  11. 11. Placement of a Hardware FS Each Partition contains a File System Raw (no FS) Organized Organized one is initialized by the corresponding Formating “Partition Type is to OS” W95*, DOS*, BSD*, Solaris*, Linux, ... “Format Type is to File System” ext2, ext3, vfat, ntfs, jffs2, … Particular Partition Types support only Particular File System Types © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 11 All Rights Reserved.
  12. 12. Design a FS Let's Take 1 Partition With 16 blocks of 2 sectors each Size = 16 x 2 x 512 bytes = 16KB Given 3 data pieces Source Code – 2.5KB Image – 8KB Document – 2KB Place optimally for further operations © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 12 All Rights Reserved.
  13. 13. Kernel Space File System © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 13 All Rights Reserved.
  14. 14. Kernel Space File System Has 2 Roles to Play Decode the Hardware FS Layout to access data (by implementing your logic in s/w) Interface that with the User Space FS to give you a unified view, as you all see at / First part: ext2, ext3, vfat, ntfs, jffs2, … Also called the File System modules Second part: VFS Kernel provides VFS to achieve the virtual user view So, FS module should actually interact with VFS © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 14 All Rights Reserved.
  15. 15. Linux specific File Systems Initial Linux: Minix FS As Linux matured: Extended (ext) FS 1994: Second Extended (ext2) FS Latest: Third Extended (ext3) FS Features Introduced: Access Control Lists (ACL) Block Fragmentation Logical Deletion Journaling © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 15 All Rights Reserved.
  16. 16. Linux FS Data Structures Super block – Stores filesystem meta data Inode – Stores file meta data Directory Entry – Stores file name & inode number Inode & Data block Bitmap – Bitmap for tracking usage status of the various blocks Group Entry – Stores information of groups of Data Storage © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 16 All Rights Reserved.
  17. 17. Linux FS Transitions Choosing Optimal Block Size (from 1KiB to 4KiB), depending on the expected average file length Choosing Number of Inodes Partition Groups: Each group includes Data Blocks and Inodes stored in adjacent tracks Preallocating Disk Data Blocks to Regular Files Fast Symbolic Links © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 17 All Rights Reserved.
  18. 18. File System related Commands File and Inode information – stat Hardlinks and Softlinks – ln & ln -s Mounting filesystem – mount & umount Creating special files – mknod, mkfifo Permission related – chmod Ownership related – chown, chgrp Timestamp related – touch © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 18 All Rights Reserved.
  19. 19. Case Study: ext2/ext3 © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 19 All Rights Reserved.
  20. 20. ext2/ext3: Disk Data Structure Boot Block group 0 ... Block group n block Super Group Data block Inode Inode Data blocks block Descriptors Bitmap Bitmap Table 1 block n blocks 1 block 1 block n blocks n blocks Superblock and Group Descriptors are duplicated in each Block Group Superblock and Group Descriptors in Block Group 0 are used by the kernel © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 20 All Rights Reserved.
  21. 21. ext2/ext3: Superblock unsigned long s_frag_size; /* Size of a fragment in bytes */ unsigned long s_frags_per_block; /* Number of fragments per block */ unsigned long s_inodes_per_block; /* Number of inodes per block */ unsigned long s_frags_per_group; /* Number of fragments in a group */ unsigned long s_blocks_per_group; /* Number of blocks in a group */ unsigned long s_inodes_per_group; /* Number of inodes in a group */ unsigned long s_itb_per_group; /* Number of inode table blocks per group */ unsigned long s_gdb_count; /* Number of group descriptor blocks */ unsigned long s_desc_per_block; /* Number of group descriptors per block */ unsigned long s_groups_count; /* Number of groups in the fs */ ... © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 21 All Rights Reserved.
  22. 22. ext2/ext3: Group Descriptor __le32 bg_block_bitmap; /* Blocks bitmap block number */ __le32 bg_inode_bitmap; /* Inodes bitmap block number */ __le32 bg_inode_table; /* Inodes table first block number */ __le16 bg_free_blocks_count; /* Free blocks in the group */ __le16 bg_free_inodes_count; /* Free inodes in the group */ __le16 bg_used_dirs_count; /* Directories in the group */ __le16 bg_pad; /* Alignment to word */ __le32 bg_reserved[3]; /* Nulls to pad out 24 bytes */ © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 22 All Rights Reserved.
  23. 23. ext2/ext3: Inode Entry Inode Table consists of Inode Entries. An Inode Entry is as follows __le16 i_mode; /* File type & access rights */ __le16 i_uid; /* Low 16 bits of owner uid */ __le32 i_size; /* File size in bytes */ __le32 i_atime; /* Last file access time */ __le32 i_ctime; /* File creation time */ __le32 i_mtime; /* Last file contents modification time */ __le32 i_dtime; /* File deletion time */ __le16 i_gid; /* Low 16 bits of group id */ __le16 i_links_count; /* Hard links counter */ __le32 i_blocks; /* Number of data blocks of the file */ __le32 i_flags; /* File flags */ union osd1; /* OS specific information */ __le32 i_block[12 + 3]; /* Pointers to data blocks */ ... © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 23 All Rights Reserved.
  24. 24. ext2/ext3: File Types File Types supported File Type Value Description 0 Unknown 1 Regular 2 Directory 3 Character Device 4 Block Device 5 Named Pipe 6 Socket 7 Symbolic Link © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 24 All Rights Reserved.
  25. 25. ext2/ext3: Directory Entry Directory is a File, with Data Blocks containing Directory Entries A Directory Entry is as follows __le32 inode; /* Inode number */ __le16 rec_len; /* Directory entry length */ __u8 name_len; /* Name length */ __u8 file_type; /* File type */ char name[255]; /* File name */ © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 25 All Rights Reserved.
  26. 26. Virtual File System © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 26 All Rights Reserved.
  27. 27. VFS Specifics Inherited from the Linux specific FS Promoted to a super set of various FS Provides a unified view to the User Default values for various attributes owner, group, permissions, … File Types Same seven types as in ext2/ext3 © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 27 All Rights Reserved.
  28. 28. Virtual File System Interactions User Space File System View @ / VFS .... ext2 .... vfat .... Partition 0 Partition 1 ... Partition N ... © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 28 All Rights Reserved.
  29. 29. Virtual File System Internals d r Super Block Directory Entry Table Inode Table > FS Meta Data > Root Inode Number > File Name > Inode Number > File Meta Data > File Data Block Nos Data Block © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 29 All Rights Reserved.
  30. 30. Recall: User Space File System © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 30 All Rights Reserved.
  31. 31. / & the System Directories /bin, /sbin - system binaries/applications /var - logs, mails /proc, /sys - “virtual” windows into the kernel /etc - configuration files /lib - shared system libraries /dev - device files /boot - Linux kernel and boot related binary files /opt - for third-party packages /root, /home - home directory for super user & other users /usr - user space related files and dirs (binaries, libraries, ...) /tmp - scratch pad /mnt - mount points © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 31 All Rights Reserved.
  32. 32. What all have we learnt? W's of a File System Three Levels of File System Hardware Space Kernel Space User Space © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 32 All Rights Reserved.
  33. 33. Any Queries? © 2010 Anil Kumar Pugalia <email@sarika-pugs.com> 33 All Rights Reserved.

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