The Power of STEM Learning inAfter School and SummerKasey Blackburn, Oakland Unified School DistrictKatie Brackenridge, Pa...
Why are we here?3 Main Goals• Understanding• Opportunity• Inspiration
Out-of-School Time? Expanded Learning? After School and Summer?        A wide range of programs that promote learning and ...
How big is OST?        ASES                                          21st CCLC   $550 million                             ...
Federal and State Investment
CA’s State Investment
Why STEM in OST makes sense?• Best practices in STEM and OST align    Active    Collaborative    Meaningful    Support...
Real world example: Oakland USD• Year-round opportunity:   • After School Science Learning     Community   • Summer Scienc...
Key Practice: Staff Training and Coaching•   Focus on inquiry•   Outline science lesson plan structure•   Use effective qu...
Training Strategies          •Trainers model          •Hands-on activities          •Structured reflection          •Case ...
Sample Results from Summer Science• Staff results“I know the necessary steps to teach science conceptseffectively”8% pre t...
Key Practice: Partnership• After-school program providers• School district• Informal science education institution• Other ...
Table Talk: OpportunitiesWhat are the opportunities in your community? What additional information or resources do        ...
Thank You!partnershipforchildren.org   techbridgegirls.org
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The Power of STEM Learning in After School and Summer

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  • Before we share our goals, we’d like to hear yours. What are your goals for this presentation? What drew you here? What would you like to learn?Purpose of this presentation:Build your knowledge of the out-of-school time field as fertile soil for STEM learningShare the opportunities for STEM partnerships and a model of staff trainingInspire you to consider the opportunity of partnering with the out of school time fieldto support effective STEM learning
  • Expanded looks very unique in California; helpful to provide a picture of this world2002: Proposition 49: voter ballot initiative: not only to increase the funding for out of school time programs but also permanently earmark funds for these types of programs.Increases state grant funds available for out of school time programsAll public schools, eligible for after school grants ranging from $50,000–$75,000. Maintains local funding match requirementProvides priority for additional funding to schools with predominantly low-income students. 98% of ASES money is used for students classified as low-income.2002: 21st Century Only federal funding source exclusively for after school Grants administered by State education agenciesIncludes academic enrichment & other youth development programsIs focused towards high poverty, low performing schoolsMany programs apply for both funding streamsThe vast majority—97 percent—of ASES and 21st Century funding goes to programs aimed at students from low-income families
  • OST PrinciplesFlexible time for exploration and inquiryOST culture of youth development and project-based learningOpportunity to complement and expand on school-day curriculum
  • Frame this as a year-round approach to STEM learning in OSTFor each A/S Science LC and SSP, briefly describe:What is it?Who participates?What do they do?Who pays for it?Summer Science Project5 elementary school sites 300 3rd to 5th gradersPartners – Community-based after school providers, district, Techbridge, Partnership for Children and Youth, fundersWatt’s Up Curriculum – 90 min/day of STEM in a 3 hr/day programKey practice: Staff training and coachingImpact: What is the impact on kids, staff, schools?
  • Mirror – active, collaborative, meaningful, mastery, expands horizonsOST PrinciplesFlexible time for exploration and inquiryOST culture of youth development and project-based learningOpportunity to complement and expand on school-day curriculum
  • Engage in different methods of delivery to help participants gain perspective and practice. modeling modes of presentation/ engagementSharecoaching rubric –
  • Show growth of staff knowledge and student interest
  • Frame this as a year-round approach to STEM learning in OSTFor each A/S Science LC and SSP, briefly describe:What is it?Who participates?What do they do?Who pays for it?Summer Science Project5 elementary school sites 300 3rd to 5th gradersPartners – Community-based after school providers, district, Techbridge, Partnership for Children and Youth, fundersWatt’s Up Curriculum – 90 min/day of STEM in a 3 hr/day programKey practice: Staff training and coachingImpact: What is the impact on kids, staff, schools?
  • The Power of STEM Learning in After School and Summer

    1. 1. The Power of STEM Learning inAfter School and SummerKasey Blackburn, Oakland Unified School DistrictKatie Brackenridge, Partnership for Children and YouthJen Joyce, TechbridgeLinda Kekelis, Techbridge
    2. 2. Why are we here?3 Main Goals• Understanding• Opportunity• Inspiration
    3. 3. Out-of-School Time? Expanded Learning? After School and Summer? A wide range of programs that promote learning and enhance the development of youth outside of regular school hours
    4. 4. How big is OST? ASES 21st CCLC $550 million $130 million annually annually• Proposition 49 • Federal initiative but• All public schools are administered by state eligible, including charter • Includes academic schools enrichment & youth• Priority for schools with development predominantly low • Focused on high income students poverty, low performing schoolsCurrently, we have over 4,200 publicly funded expanded learning programsites serving over 400,000 students, more than all other states combined.
    5. 5. Federal and State Investment
    6. 6. CA’s State Investment
    7. 7. Why STEM in OST makes sense?• Best practices in STEM and OST align  Active  Collaborative  Meaningful  Supports Mastery  Expands Horizons• Flexible time for exploration and inquiry• Opportunity to complement and expand on school-day curriculum
    8. 8. Real world example: Oakland USD• Year-round opportunity: • After School Science Learning Community • Summer Science Project• Impacts: • Staff confidence and skill • Youth learning and engagement
    9. 9. Key Practice: Staff Training and Coaching• Focus on inquiry• Outline science lesson plan structure• Use effective questioning• Use strategies to promote equity• Incorporate meaningful reflection• Embed career exploration into activities
    10. 10. Training Strategies •Trainers model •Hands-on activities •Structured reflection •Case studies •Participants model •Collaboration
    11. 11. Sample Results from Summer Science• Staff results“I know the necessary steps to teach science conceptseffectively”8% pre to 83% post• Student resultsThe summer science program madescience more fun: 92%
    12. 12. Key Practice: Partnership• After-school program providers• School district• Informal science education institution• Other technical assistance providers
    13. 13. Table Talk: OpportunitiesWhat are the opportunities in your community? What additional information or resources do you need?
    14. 14. Thank You!partnershipforchildren.org techbridgegirls.org

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